Question Help to assemble this gaming system

Aug 19, 2022
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Hi there, I am aiming to assemble a gaming system that will be able to run games like Assassin's creed Valhalla/ new resident evil 4 remake , red redemption and so on..
Need not to upgrade the system for at least 5 years and be able to play games with normal to high graphic display settings.

The budget im willing to put is around 1000 US Dollars given or taken around 100 $.

Kinda need the speed and graphic to be satisfying for 5 years for normal to high graphical display settings of games.

Currently im living in iran and this is what i have gathered so far:

Mother board:Asus Prime H610M-E D4
CPU:i5 12400 Box
VGA: AMD Radeon™ RX 6600
Ram :G.SKILL Trident Z DDR4 3200MHz CL16 Dual Channel Desktop RAM - 16GB
S.S.D:adata XPG SX8200 PRO (also got 1tb hard drive from my previous system)
Power:Green 550 UK PLUS


Is it a good system that will make me go on with games with no problem for at least 5 years? I am not a pro gamer just the kind like i mentioned.

P.S:I also am a programmer/developer that i need speed around 16gb for the system.

Really would appreciate your guidance. :)
 
Aug 19, 2022
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No. Not even close.

Why?

That's why:


Can you tell me, why would you want to go with this PSU? Other than the PSU company is Iran based. :unsure:
Hello, thank you for your reply.
my reason is that i could have a cheaper PSU so that i could spend the money on other parts.
I would really appreciate it you could tell me why its not a good one and which to replace that i can find in iran?

also may i ask that Is the rest of the parts alright?

How about
Thermaltake TR2 600W Gold or
PSU power G800 Gold cooler master? are they better?
 
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I am aiming to assemble a gaming system that will be able to run games like Assassin's creed Valhalla/ new resident evil 4 remake , red redemption and so on..
Need not to upgrade the system for at least 5 years and be able to play games with normal to high graphic display settings.

Is the rest of the parts alright?
this completely depends on what type of settings you would intend to use and what type of performance you expect with the most demanding of your games.

higher resolutions with higher in-game settings and higher frames per second are not going to be possible with this system even now let alone up to 5 years from now.
 
Aug 19, 2022
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this completely depends on what type of settings you would intend to use and what type of performance you expect with the most demanding of your games.

higher resolutions with higher in-game settings and higher frames per second are not going to be possible with this system even now let alone up to 5 years from now.
Hi, Thanks for your reply.

Lets say i want to play Assassins creed Valhalla high graphic and smooth frame rate.
May i ask which part wont allow me with high graphic?
i searched it's recommended settings and found these specs performing better than that, is it wrong way to analyse ?
 

Aeacus

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my reason is that i could have a cheaper PSU so that i could spend the money on other parts.
I would really appreciate it you could tell me why its not a good one and which to replace that i can find in iran?
Sine PSU powers everything, it is the most important component inside the PC. And you'll never want to cheap out on PSU, that is IF you care about your PC.

Not all PSUs are made equal and there are bad PSUs out there and good PSUs out there. To know which ones are bad and which are good, you need to read PSU reviews. Now, have you read the review of the PSU you planning to get? Heck, is there even a review of that PSU? Since i looked and couldn't find anything. PSUs are guilty until proven innocent; you need reasons to buy a PSU, not reasons to reject a PSU.

--

Speaking of PSUs, here is an example, between two 80+ Gold, 550W units,
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/JHWfrH,3H2bt6/

Can you tell me, why Seasonic PSU is 50% more expensive than Silverstone unit?

--

Good quality PSUs are: Seasonic Focus series and Corsair RM/ RMx /RMi series.
Great quality PSUs are: Seasonic PRIME series and Corsair HX/ HXi/ AX/ AXi series.

Yes, they may be expensive, but this is so with all things, good quality will cost money, while poor quality costs peanuts. And if you want to have good and cheap PSU, you have to buy two PSUs: the good one and the cheap one.

also may i ask that Is the rest of the parts alright?
The rest of the parts are mid-tier at current date. You could get 5+ years out of them, IF you are willing to play on 1080p and few years in the future, also reducing game graphical levels, to get good FPS out of the games.

Lets say i want to play Assassins creed Valhalla high graphic and smooth frame rate.
On what resolution?
 
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Aug 19, 2022
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Speaking of PSUs, here is an example, between two 80+ Gold, 550W units,
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/JHWfrH,3H2bt6/

Can you tell me, why Seasonic PSU is 50% more expensive than Silverstone unit?

--

Good quality PSUs are: Seasonic Focus series and Corsair RM/ RMx /RMi series.
Great quality PSUs are: Seasonic PRIME series and Corsair HX/ HXi/ AX/ AXi series.
Thanks a lot. well to answer your question, i think SeaSonic has better specs than Silverstone (Modular, EPS,SATA..) plus the better rate review.

On what resolution?
1920x1080

Also i got your point i guess, which i really appreciate, since you r specialist, may i ask your opinion about these 2 PSUs as well?

Thermaltake TR2 600W Gold and power G800 Gold cooler master?
 
higher resolutions with higher in-game settings and higher frames per second are not going to be possible with this system even now let alone up to 5 years from now.
Lets say i want to play Assassins creed Valhalla high graphic and smooth frame rate.
May i ask which part wont allow me with high graphic?
smooth frame rate and higher frame rates are not the same thing.

i would consider anything under 100fps a lower frame rate these days.
but you could be running @ 40fps and still be "smooth".

and if you're running on a large enough screen, like ≥27", at a nice resolution, like 1440p, with high-ultra settings then the i5-12400 CPU may have some difficulty providing enough frames to the GPU and the RX 6600 GPU will definitely have difficulty rendering higher quality graphics at these settings.
RT effects will be off the table for sure.

also over the next 5 years games will definitely become even more demanding.
may i ask your opinion about these 2 PSUs as well?

Thermaltake TR2 600W Gold and power G800 Gold cooler master?
the Thermaltake isn't top tier but isn't bad either.
if it has a decent warranty, ~7-10 years, i would consider it a decent option.

i haven't seen any reviews or read any reports about this Cooler Master model yet.
 
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Aeacus

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Also i got your point i guess, which i really appreciate, since you r specialist, may i ask your opinion about these 2 PSUs as well?

Thermaltake TR2 600W Gold and power G800 Gold cooler master?
Tt TR2 is better than CM G800, however, both are still below good quality Seasonic Focus and Corsair RM/RMx/RMi series.

Rather than you listing PSUs one-by-one, and me then telling how they fare, i suggest you look into this guideline here,
link: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/psucultists-psu-tier-list-rev-14-8-final-update-jul-21.3624094/

Good/great PSUs are Tier A. And this is also what i suggest. E.g Tt TR2 and CM G800 are Tier B. And i'd put the Green PSU you initially wanted to go, to Tier D, since there is 0 evidence of it being better than crap. On the contrary, it has several red flags.
To name the few red flags it has:
  • huge emphasis on how PSU looks <- great sign that PSU is sold for the looks, rather than performance
  • 62 months (5 years and 2 months) of warranty <- very strange warranty period. Usually, warranties are with full year, not X years and X months. And Green brand also claims "10 years after-sales service". <- What that's supposed to mean? Are they deciding, if to give you "service" e.g 7 years after PSU has been bought? And what kind of "service"? Advice of: "Buy a new PSU."?
Regarding warranty, you can actually tell from the length of it, how reliable the PSU would be.
For example:
Thermaltake TR2 600 - 3 years
Cooler Master G800 - 5 years
Corsair RM - 5 years
Green GP550A-UK Plus - 5 years and 2 months <- Very strange warranty period. Never seen such a thing on PSUs.
Seasonic Core - 7 years
Corsair RMx/ RMi - 10 years
Seasonic Focus - 10 years
Seasonic PRIME - 12 years <- Longest warranty ever given to a PSU and only PSU series that has 12 years of warranty in the whole world.

All three of my PCs are also powered by Seasonic (full specs with pics in my sig), while i have two PRIME series PSUs (and yes, they do have 12 years of warranty, i even contacted Seasonic and asked it from them), and one Focus PX series PSU (with 10 years of warranty).

--

You can cheap out on every other component inside the PC except PSU. I've said it before, but i'll say it again: Because PSU powers everything, it is the most important component inside the PC. Also, while the PSU warranty covers the PSU itself and you can RMA the blown PSU, the PSU warranty doesn't cover any other component the PSU fried.

Most people learn the hard way not to cheap out on a PSU when low quality PSU blows and takes part of the system or the whole system with it. Even entire houses have been burned down because of the fire low quality PSU caused when it blowed up.
News article: https://www.thesundaily.my/archive/subang-fire-caused-faulty-power-supply-unit-computer-updated-LTARCH461974

Like it or not, if you want your PC to work for years to come without any risk of fire and/or damage to your components, you need to hand out some money for good quality PSU. I'm not talking that you need to go with the best PSU money can buy, e.g Seasonic PRIME 650 (80+ Titanium), which costs $250+ (and which also powers my Skylake build). Seasonic Focus GX-550 i suggested and gave as an example above, costs $120 and is more than enough for your PC, both wattage and build quality wise.
Amazon listing: https://www.amazon.com/Seasonic-GX-550-Full-Modular-Application-SSR-550FX/dp/B07WQYM74W

However, if you go with "budget" PSU, please, do record a video when your cheap PSU blows up since i like to see some good fireworks. Just like seen in here,
youtube:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6snWfd1v7M


If you still think cheaping out on PSU and going with "budget" PSU is best for your PC, i'll be waiting a video from you with good fireworks.

Lets say i want to play Assassins creed Valhalla high graphic and smooth frame rate.
May i ask which part wont allow me with high graphic?
1920x1080
What hardware is needed for 1080p and Ultra, is listed here,
link: https://www.ign.com/wikis/assassins-creed-valhalla/PC_Recommended_Specs

Look at "Enthusiast PC requirements". Now, those are tuned to High Quality, with 1440p (2K) @ 60 FPS but hardware that can do that, can do Ultra Quality with 1080p @ 120 FPS.
Essentially, GTX 1080 will do, or today's equivalent is RTX 2070 or RTX 3060 Ti. On AMD side, RX 6650XT.

if it has a decent warranty, ~7-10 years, i would consider it a decent option.
And if you'd bother to check it (like i did) then you'd know for sure. Why assume things? :unsure:
 
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geofelt

Titan
First of all, the I5-12400 is an excellent pick for gaming.
Here is a review:
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-core-i5-12400-review

The processor is entirely capable of running a much stronger graphics card which is your most likely upgrade within the next 5 years.

For that you need a good power supply.
Consider one as a long term investment.
Co not buy a cheap psu.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It may not have all safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability;
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.
There are many psu quality tiers and opinions.
One good way to assess quality is to look at the warranty.
If you see a 7 to 10 year warranty, you are likely looking at a good quality unit.
Usualy near wattage tiers do not come at much of a price delta.
I would suggest 650w, but often 750w will be priced nearly the same.

Motherboard is inexpensive but will be ok.

Most of the time, the Trident series of ram comes at a price premium over the less flashy g.skil Ripjaws with identical specs.
 
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Nighthawk117

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Hi there, I am aiming to assemble a gaming system that will be able to run games like Assassin's creed Valhalla/ new resident evil 4 remake , red redemption and so on..
Need not to upgrade the system for at least 5 years and be able to play games with normal to high graphic display settings.

The budget im willing to put is around 1000 US Dollars given or taken around 100 $.

Kinda need the speed and graphic to be satisfying for 5 years for normal to high graphical display settings of games.

Currently im living in iran and this is what i have gathered so far:

Mother board:Asus Prime H610M-E D4
CPU:i5 12400 Box
VGA: AMD Radeon™ RX 6600
Ram :G.SKILL Trident Z DDR4 3200MHz CL16 Dual Channel Desktop RAM - 16GB
S.S.D:adata XPG SX8200 PRO (also got 1tb hard drive from my previous system)
Power:Green 550 UK PLUS


Is it a good system that will make me go on with games with no problem for at least 5 years? I am not a pro gamer just the kind like i mentioned.

P.S:I also am a programmer/developer that i need speed around 16gb for the system.

Really would appreciate your guidance. :)
It would depend on what sort of performance you demand during that 5 years. Games 5 years from now will almost certainly run on that system but for the Assassins Creed out then, probably with significant graphical compromise. If you can I would get a better board and PSU.
 
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Aeacus

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and stating that, "if", is not assuming anything but telling someone what to look out for.
If = assumption
When = certainty
We use "IF" to introduce a possible or unreal situation or condition. We use "WHEN" to refer to the time of a future situation or condition that we are certain of.
E.g with crap quality PSUs, question isn't IF they fail and take the whole system with it, but WHEN they fail.
 
We use "IF" to introduce a possible or unreal situation or condition. We use "WHEN" to refer to the time of a future situation or condition that we are certain of.
exactly.
"if" it had a decent warranty, then it would be considered a decent option.
there is no "assumption" that it does.

maybe you need some more grammar training or possibly a better translator for English?
with crap quality PSUs, question isn't IF they fail and take the whole system with it, but WHEN they fail.
and being just below the top tier of rated power supplies does not infer that one is "crap".
 

Aeacus

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"if" it had a decent warranty, then it would be considered a decent option.
Warranty period alone can not be used to determinate PSU's quality. It is more of a guideline, than actual rule. Slapping 7 or 10 years of warranty on a low/mediocre quality unit, without any changes to PSU itself, can not be called good/great quality unit, just because it has 10 years of warranty.

Same goes with PSU's efficiency. Just because PSU is 80+ Gold or even 80+ Titanium, doesn't make it a good PSU. There are loads of 80+ Gold units, that are low quality or even complete crap. E.g Silverstone, somehow, managed to produce low quality 80+ Titanium unit.

and being just below the top tier of rated power supplies does not infer that one is "crap".
Never said that. What i did say, was suggesting of going with Tier A.
 
Aug 19, 2022
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smooth frame rate and higher frame rates are not the same thing.

i would consider anything under 100fps a lower frame rate these days.
but you could be running @ 40fps and still be "smooth".

and if you're running on a large enough screen, like ≥27", at a nice resolution, like 1440p, with high-ultra settings then the i5-12400 CPU may have some difficulty providing enough frames to the GPU and the RX 6600 GPU will definitely have difficulty rendering higher quality graphics at these settings.
RT effects will be off the table for sure.

also over the next 5 years games will definitely become even more demanding.

the Thermaltake isn't top tier but isn't bad either.
if it has a decent warranty, ~7-10 years, i would consider it a decent option.

i haven't seen any reviews or read any reports about this Cooler Master model yet.
Thank you so much sir, i will consider what you mentioned :)
 
Aug 19, 2022
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10
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Tt TR2 is better than CM G800, however, both are still below good quality Seasonic Focus and Corsair RM/RMx/RMi series.

Rather than you listing PSUs one-by-one, and me then telling how they fare, i suggest you look into this guideline here,
link: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/psucultists-psu-tier-list-rev-14-8-final-update-jul-21.3624094/

Good/great PSUs are Tier A. And this is also what i suggest. E.g Tt TR2 and CM G800 are Tier B. And i'd put the Green PSU you initially wanted to go, to Tier D, since there is 0 evidence of it being better than crap. On the contrary, it has several red flags.
To name the few red flags it has:
  • huge emphasis on how PSU looks <- great sign that PSU is sold for the looks, rather than performance
  • 62 months (5 years and 2 months) of warranty <- very strange warranty period. Usually, warranties are with full year, not X years and X months. And Green brand also claims "10 years after-sales service". <- What that's supposed to mean? Are they deciding, if to give you "service" e.g 7 years after PSU has been bought? And what kind of "service"? Advice of: "Buy a new PSU."?
Regarding warranty, you can actually tell from the length of it, how reliable the PSU would be.
For example:
Thermaltake TR2 600 - 3 years
Cooler Master G800 - 5 years
Corsair RM - 5 years
Green GP550A-UK Plus - 5 years and 2 months <- Very strange warranty period. Never seen such a thing on PSUs.
Seasonic Core - 7 years
Corsair RMx/ RMi - 10 years
Seasonic Focus - 10 years
Seasonic PRIME - 12 years <- Longest warranty ever given to a PSU and only PSU series that has 12 years of warranty in the whole world.

All three of my PCs are also powered by Seasonic (full specs with pics in my sig), while i have two PRIME series PSUs (and yes, they do have 12 years of warranty, i even contacted Seasonic and asked it from them), and one Focus PX series PSU (with 10 years of warranty).

--

You can cheap out on every other component inside the PC except PSU. I've said it before, but i'll say it again: Because PSU powers everything, it is the most important component inside the PC. Also, while the PSU warranty covers the PSU itself and you can RMA the blown PSU, the PSU warranty doesn't cover any other component the PSU fried.

Most people learn the hard way not to cheap out on a PSU when low quality PSU blows and takes part of the system or the whole system with it. Even entire houses have been burned down because of the fire low quality PSU caused when it blowed up.
News article: https://www.thesundaily.my/archive/subang-fire-caused-faulty-power-supply-unit-computer-updated-LTARCH461974

Like it or not, if you want your PC to work for years to come without any risk of fire and/or damage to your components, you need to hand out some money for good quality PSU. I'm not talking that you need to go with the best PSU money can buy, e.g Seasonic PRIME 650 (80+ Titanium), which costs $250+ (and which also powers my Skylake build). Seasonic Focus GX-550 i suggested and gave as an example above, costs $120 and is more than enough for your PC, both wattage and build quality wise.
Amazon listing: https://www.amazon.com/Seasonic-GX-550-Full-Modular-Application-SSR-550FX/dp/B07WQYM74W

However, if you go with "budget" PSU, please, do record a video when your cheap PSU blows up since i like to see some good fireworks. Just like seen in here,
youtube:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6snWfd1v7M


If you still think cheaping out on PSU and going with "budget" PSU is best for your PC, i'll be waiting a video from you with good fireworks.




What hardware is needed for 1080p and Ultra, is listed here,
link: https://www.ign.com/wikis/assassins-creed-valhalla/PC_Recommended_Specs

Look at "Enthusiast PC requirements". Now, those are tuned to High Quality, with 1440p (2K) @ 60 FPS but hardware that can do that, can do Ultra Quality with 1080p @ 120 FPS.
Essentially, GTX 1080 will do, or today's equivalent is RTX 2070 or RTX 3060 Ti. On AMD side, RX 6650XT.



And if you'd bother to check it (like i did) then you'd know for sure. Why assume things? :unsure:
Really really appreciate all your time for this valuable information. Yes i completely agree with the point you are making which is reasonable and logical. thank you
 
Aug 19, 2022
7
0
10
0
First of all, the I5-12400 is an excellent pick for gaming.
Here is a review:
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-core-i5-12400-review

The processor is entirely capable of running a much stronger graphics card which is your most likely upgrade within the next 5 years.

For that you need a good power supply.
Consider one as a long term investment.
Co not buy a cheap psu.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It may not have all safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability;
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.
There are many psu quality tiers and opinions.
One good way to assess quality is to look at the warranty.
If you see a 7 to 10 year warranty, you are likely looking at a good quality unit.
Usualy near wattage tiers do not come at much of a price delta.
I would suggest 650w, but often 750w will be priced nearly the same.

Motherboard is inexpensive but will be ok.

Most of the time, the Trident series of ram comes at a price premium over the less flashy g.skil Ripjaws with identical specs.
Wow thanks for the valuable information, i am now satisfied with the cpu. Thank you so much :)
 
the Thermaltake isn't top tier but isn't bad either.
if it has a decent warranty, ~7-10 years, i would consider it a decent option.
with crap quality PSUs, question isn't IF they fail and take the whole system with it, but WHEN they fail.
this last statement is directly related to the conversation concerning the Thermaltake.
in which you did reply a concern, only involving this one unit that our conversation included, that it was "crap" quality.

now if it does only include a few years warranty it would be excluded from my list of possibilities, but that does not determine that it is of "crap" build quality.
 

punkncat

Distinguished
Ambassador
There was a post the other day regarding a (supposed) quality unit from Corsair that offered a 10 year warranty on the new unit. Those weren't available but poster was discussing a refurb unit of that model with some short term warranty. In that regard I had suggested doing a bit of review crawling to see if there was any indication why these were readily available as a refurb. Seems strange that such a "quality" unit, based solely on length of warranty, would be readily available that way.

I don't think length of warranty has any real indication of the actual quality of the unit, but rather the chance the manufacturer is willing to take against "making good" on a unit that fails. We have to consider that many PC users wouldn't pay attention enough to know, or bother trying to deal with a warranty many years down the line. A portion of those who would 'might' be able to find the receipt, and of course the small portion of users that actually keep track of that stuff and have records, files, registration of warranty, etc. I suspect that last number to be something that even quality branded companies of repute might roll the dice on from time to time.
 

Aeacus

Champion
Ambassador
Really really appreciate all your time for this valuable information. Yes i completely agree with the point you are making which is reasonable and logical. thank you
You're welcome. :)

I hope that with this additional info, you have more tools at hand, to select proper, good quality PSU for your build. And also perhaps look into another, more powerful GPU, for future proofing, to last the 5+ years you're looking for.

this last statement is directly related to the conversation concerning the Thermaltake.
in which you did reply a concern, only involving this one unit that our conversation included, that it was "crap" quality.
I never said that Tt TR2 is "crap" quality. Do read what i wrote.

What i did say, was that Tt TR2 is actually better than CM G800 PSU, while both are within Tier B.

You, yourself said that "IF" the Tt unit doesn't have the "decent" warranty period of 7-10 years, it isn't a decent option to go for. Now, it has mere 3 years of warranty and based on your logic, of it falling far short of "decent" (3 vs 7 years of warranty), what it is then? Low quality?

now if it does only include a few years warranty it would be excluded from my list of possibilities, but that does not determine that it is of "crap" build quality.
Yet, according to the PSU ranking guideline, Tt TR2 Gold series PSUs are solid Tier B. Indicating that the PSU does have some quality parts within it, despite having only 3 years of warranty. <- Making the point that warranty period alone can not be used to tell if PSU is bad or good. You need to read the actual review, from reputable reviewer (e.g Aris or JonnyGuru) to know if the PSU is bad or good.

There was a post the other day regarding a (supposed) quality unit from Corsair that offered a 10 year warranty on the new unit. Those weren't available but poster was discussing a refurb unit of that model with some short term warranty. In that regard I had suggested doing a bit of review crawling to see if there was any indication why these were readily available as a refurb. Seems strange that such a "quality" unit, based solely on length of warranty, would be readily available that way.
For some reason, when Corsair refurbs their PSUs and puts them on sale again, they only give 90 days of warranty to manufacturer refurbished PSU, regardless if the unit is low quality CV series (with initial 3 years of warranty) or great quality AX series (with initial 10 years of warranty).
 
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