Question (Help) What could I upgrade on my pc to make it run faster!

Apr 16, 2019
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Hi I would like some advice on what to upgrade on my pc to make it run smoother and handle more things. I’m thinking I need a better processor in my pc. For example when I try gaming and having a program to record my gameplay or for example streaming, my pc starts to make the game slow and take longer to load graphics and textures and it’s annoying cause it takes way longer than should. Just makes the pc slow.

Specs; processor- amd a10-5800b apu with Radeon(tm) hd graphics 3.92GHz
Ram- 16.0gb
System- 64-bit
Gtx 1050ti graphics card
Motherboard- msi a68hm-e33 v2
 

QwerkyPengwen

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in general, the CPU could be what's holding you back.

But then again, it could be slow RAM, but we wouldn't know since you didn't specify the speed of the RAM, just how much of it you have.

Overall, a platform upgrade would make things feel a bit snappier.

But before you do that, let's take into consideration that you are using an older HDD and you haven't been keeping your OS clean. That could be slowing you down considerably.

So I would say first backup all important files.

Then get an SSD.

Then do a clean install of Windows to the SSD (make sure no other drives are installed when doing this otherwise the Windows MBR could end up being installed on a separate drive and that's a headache to deal with in the event that the separate drive it installed to either fails, or you decide to replace it with an upgrade)

Having a clean install of Windows can itself make things a bit faster.
And having an SSD will make it for sure snappier.

But as for multitasking newer programs and such, a platform upgrade is required.

Now before I go providing the cheapest upgrade options that are worth while for you, I need to know what country you are in. After that, I will provide you with an upgrade option that is as cheap as I can find on PCPP, and then you can decide if it's within your budget.

However, knowing a budget helps because if you have a decent enough budget, can opt for less low tier components and get more worth while upgrades that maximize the budget's potential.

So to sum things up:
give us your general budget range, and your country.
 
Reactions: Maru777
Apr 16, 2019
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in general, the CPU could be what's holding you back.

But then again, it could be slow RAM, but we wouldn't know since you didn't specify the speed of the RAM, just how much of it you have.

Overall, a platform upgrade would make things feel a bit snappier.

But before you do that, let's take into consideration that you are using an older HDD and you haven't been keeping your OS clean. That could be slowing you down considerably.

So I would say first backup all important files.

Then get an SSD.

Then do a clean install of Windows to the SSD (make sure no other drives are installed when doing this otherwise the Windows MBR could end up being installed on a separate drive and that's a headache to deal with in the event that the separate drive it installed to either fails, or you decide to replace it with an upgrade)

Having a clean install of Windows can itself make things a bit faster.
And having an SSD will make it for sure snappier.

But as for multitasking newer programs and such, a platform upgrade is required.

Now before I go providing the cheapest upgrade options that are worth while for you, I need to know what country you are in. After that, I will provide you with an upgrade option that is as cheap as I can find on PCPP, and then you can decide if it's within your budget.

However, knowing a budget helps because if you have a decent enough budget, can opt for less low tier components and get more worth while upgrades that maximize the budget's potential.

So to sum things up:
give us your general budget range, and your country.
USA and somewhere from 0-200
 

QwerkyPengwen

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ok, well for $200 you aren't getting much of an upgrade to the platform.

So here's what I recommend.

you get the SSD first, then do the backup of important data to the cloud or whatever, then do a clean install of Windows to the SSD.

Then after installing windows, you put in the HDD you have and wipe it and reuse it for mass storage.

The SSD along with a clean install of windows will make things feel a bit snappier for sure.

After that, save up what you can until you can get the remaining components in this list.
But start with the SSD.

Below are two different builds to choose from for when you get the money to upgrade.

Be aware that I have already chosen the best option for an online retailer for the components.


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.99 @ B&H)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $293.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:28 EDT-0400


Build option #2


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $318.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:30 EDT-0400
 
Apr 16, 2019
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https://pcpartpicker.com/list/NjYxzY

This would probably be considered low to moderate, and work well with the current video card.
So the whole motherboard too? And
ok, well for $200 you aren't getting much of an upgrade to the platform.

So here's what I recommend.

you get the SSD first, then do the backup of important data to the cloud or whatever, then do a clean install of Windows to the SSD.

Then after installing windows, you put in the HDD you have and wipe it and reuse it for mass storage.

The SSD along with a clean install of windows will make things feel a bit snappier for sure.

After that, save up what you can until you can get the remaining components in this list.
But start with the SSD.

Below are two different builds to choose from for when you get the money to upgrade.

Be aware that I have already chosen the best option for an online retailer for the components.


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.99 @ B&H)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $293.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:28 EDT-0400


Build option #2


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $318.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:30 EDT-0400
so I’m basically not using any of my old components. I would just buy a whole nother
Setup for my computer then?
 

Gmoney06ss

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Yes you'll definitely need a new board, as there's no cpu that will fit what you have that would be a worthwhile upgrade. I'd do what qwerky is suggesting. The 2200g is better than the 1200 I listed, and only slightly more expensive.
 

Gmoney06ss

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You would reuse your current gpu, power supply and case. As well as HDD. But as mentioned an ssd is one of the best upgrades to make a system feel snappy.

If you're comfortable buying used, you may be able to snag a 6th or 7th gen Intel platform. Maybe.
 

Karadjgne

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You have 2 sets of components in a pc. The core components of cpu, motherboard and ram and the accessories like psu, drives, gpu, case, cooler.

Your accessories are good, they can all be reused in a different pc. What's killing you is a very out-dated, out-moded, very slow and dead-end set of core components. You have no upgrade path. FM2+ has been retired, revamped and replaced years ago, along with DDR3 ram. Anything from 6th Gen Intel (we are coming up on 10th gen shortly) and AMD AM4 is all now DDR4, which is not only faster, but physically will not fit in that old DDR3 motherboard, and DDR3 will not fit in anything newer.

You have only 2 options. Keep your core components and add a band-aid such as an SSD to tide you over for another year, or replace the core components.

It's unfortunate that pc components cost so much, but what you have reached realistic End Of Life some time back and like an old good horse, simply needs putting out to pasture.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: ADATA - XPG GAMMIX D10 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($79.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $269.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-17 00:11 EDT-0400
 
Last edited:
Apr 16, 2019
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You have 2 sets of components in a pc. The core components of cpu, motherboard and ram and the accessories like psu, drives, gpu, case, cooler.

Your accessories are good, they can all be reused in a different pc. What's killing you is a very out-dated, out-moded, very slow and dead-end set of core components. You have no upgrade path. FM2+ has been retired, revamped and replaced years ago, along with DDR3 ram. Anything from 6th Gen Intel (we are coming up on 10th gen shortly) and AMD AM4 is all now DDR4, which is not only faster, but physically will not fit in that old DDR3 motherboard, and DDR3 will not fit in anything newer.

You have only 2 options. Keep your core components and add a band-aid such as an SSD to tide you over for another year, or replace the core components.

It's unfortunate that pc components cost so much, but what you have reached realistic End Of Life some time back and like an old good horse, simply needs putting out to pasture.
Hahah ok I understand now. I just bought my pc a long time ago and it had components to make it work so I just added a couple things to make it run good and now I’m figuring out that it’s not the best or even good pc lmao
 

ocer9999

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Indeed you are in for a new upgrade. This does not inc a new vga, as I dont know how serious and what games do you play. If you want to game on 1080p perhaps get a 570 4Gb which sells for 130$, if not this will give you a good rig.

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/B6gvMZ
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/B6gvMZ/by_merchant/

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: *ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($75.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: *Team - L5 LITE 3D 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($28.99 @ Newegg Business)
Total: $284.95
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-17 00:28 EDT-0400
 

Karadjgne

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Apart from the inevitable benchmark chasers and 'I just gotta have the best' impulse buyers, pretty much most ppl bought their last pc years ago, I'm still kicking a 3rd gen i7 and gtx970 from 6 years ago. Back then, that was about top of the line, but progress has caught up, and now I'm wearing a pair of shoes that's pretty worn, raggedy, and is about out of sole. So I completely understand your predicament. I'm used to spending $30 for a decent pair of Nikes, not $100+. But the options are a cheap set for $30 at Walmart that only last 3 months, or break out the credit card and buy the Nikes for $100+ and get 3 years outta them.

So you can do the band-aid, and wrap some duct-tape around those old sneakers, or get something decent that's going to last as long as the old pair did. A 2200G is cheap, it's an upgrade (of sorts) but for streaming its still just a 4 core cpu and is going to suffer. The R5 1600 is slightly more expensive, but it's 6 core + hyperthreading, 12 usable threads vrs 4, is a really good match for a 1050ti and with a little OC comes very close to matching the power of an 7th-8th gen Intel cpu. For a fraction of the cost. That's an upgrade worth spending money on.
 
Apr 16, 2019
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Apart from the inevitable benchmark chasers and 'I just gotta have the best' impulse buyers, pretty much most ppl bought their last pc years ago, I'm still kicking a 3rd gen i7 and gtx970 from 6 years ago. Back then, that was about top of the line, but progress has caught up, and now I'm wearing a pair of shoes that's pretty worn, raggedy, and is about out of sole. So I completely understand your predicament. I'm used to spending $30 for a decent pair of Nikes, not $100+. But the options are a cheap set for $30 at Walmart that only last 3 months, or break out the credit card and buy the Nikes for $100+ and get 3 years outta them.

So you can do the band-aid, and wrap some duct-tape around those old sneakers, or get something decent that's going to last as long as the old pair did. A 2200G is cheap, it's an upgrade (of sorts) but for streaming its still just a 4 core cpu and is going to suffer. The R5 1600 is slightly more expensive, but it's 6 core + hyperthreading, 12 usable threads vrs 4, is a really good match for a 1050ti and with a little OC comes very close to matching the power of an 7th-8th gen Intel cpu. For a fraction of the cost. That's an upgrade worth spending money on.
So what’s the setup you think I should go with if I grab the r5 1600
 
Apr 16, 2019
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ok, well for $200 you aren't getting much of an upgrade to the platform.

So here's what I recommend.

you get the SSD first, then do the backup of important data to the cloud or whatever, then do a clean install of Windows to the SSD.

Then after installing windows, you put in the HDD you have and wipe it and reuse it for mass storage.

The SSD along with a clean install of windows will make things feel a bit snappier for sure.

After that, save up what you can until you can get the remaining components in this list.
But start with the SSD.

Below are two different builds to choose from for when you get the money to upgrade.

Be aware that I have already chosen the best option for an online retailer for the components.


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.99 @ B&H)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $293.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:28 EDT-0400


Build option #2


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($88.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.69 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $318.33
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-16 23:30 EDT-0400
You think I should just buy another pc case and throw all that in there? I have my old pieces from this pc that I can just put together and have 2 pc’s?
 

Karadjgne

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You have options, but for the price-performance you really can't touch amd. There's nothing Intel has that's going to compare when streaming.

The 1050ti is decent for 1080p, you'll get 60+ fps in almost anything at high+ settings. The R5 2600 is slightly better than the 1600,and costs a little more, some ppl that's worth the price difference. But! Ryzen2 (3rd gen) is due to drop in a couple of months and that can change prices as retailers want room on their shelves, so it's possible that the 1600/2600 will go on bigger sales. The B450 mobo is standard now, will fit 3rd gen, so I don't expect much pricing difference there except maybe as a bundle.

An SSD will help, however that's where you'll put the OS, so when you do decide to upgrade the core components, you'll have to do yet another clean install of windows, which honestly is a time consuming if relatively easy process, so I'd even wait on that install.

Another option is change your streaming. Not sure what you are currently using, but if it's OBS, that's cpu dependent, so you could try NVENC which uses gpu power instead (from nvidia) which might give that old APU a break.
 
Apr 16, 2019
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You have options, but for the price-performance you really can't touch amd. There's nothing Intel has that's going to compare when streaming.

The 1050ti is decent for 1080p, you'll get 60+ fps in almost anything at high+ settings. The R5 2600 is slightly better than the 1600,and costs a little more, some ppl that's worth the price difference. But! Ryzen2 (3rd gen) is due to drop in a couple of months and that can change prices as retailers want room on their shelves, so it's possible that the 1600/2600 will go on bigger sales. The B450 mobo is standard now, will fit 3rd gen, so I don't expect much pricing difference there except maybe as a bundle.

An SSD will help, however that's where you'll put the OS, so when you do decide to upgrade the core components, you'll have to do yet another clean install of windows, which honestly is a time consuming if relatively easy process, so I'd even wait on that install.

Another option is change your streaming. Not sure what you are currently using, but if it's OBS, that's cpu dependent, so you could try NVENC which uses gpu power instead (from nvidia) which might give that old APU a break.
Ok so I’m thinking of grabbing the r5 1600 then and still getting the b450 mobo. Then throwing in my 1050ti. Would I still need ssd and memory?
 

Karadjgne

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Memory yes. Your old memory is DDR3, the memory used on anything new is DDR4 and won't fit.

An SSD would make things a lot faster in windows, games don't take as long to load etc, but rarely affects fps. Nothing smaller than 240/250Gb and get something decent, at just less than $70 a crucial MX500 500Gb is a steal and is big enough to handle anything streaming-wise at full ssd speeds instead of relying on the aged hdd.
 
Apr 16, 2019
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Memory yes. Your old memory is DDR3, the memory used on anything new is DDR4 and won't fit.

An SSD would make things a lot faster in windows, games don't take as long to load etc, but rarely affects fps. Nothing smaller than 240/250Gb and get something decent, at just less than $70 a crucial MX500 500Gb is a steal and is big enough to handle anything streaming-wise at full ssd speeds instead of relying on the aged hdd.
Yea I’ll just grab what qwerky had suggested of memory and ssd. I’m thinking of just throwing all this into another pc. Thinking of getting another pc case and power supply for it. What else do I need for the pc then
 

QwerkyPengwen

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If you are just looking to see what it'll be to build from scratch (while keeping the GPU and storage from your old system) then here you go.

Keep in mind that I've already picked the best options for retailers for you.

Also keep in mind that the price you see is retail, and does not include taxes.

And I chose a competent but cheap case because from what I understand you are trying to spend as little money as possible.

If the case you currently have is a good one with good airflow, then save money and don't get a new case.

Also keep in mind, this build is me keeping it as cheap as possible but without being absolutely as cheap as possible (basically choosing parts that are just a couple dollars more, but are of better quality and worth the money)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.99 @ B&H)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($84.67 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.24 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12III 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Other: DEEPCOOL FH-10 Integrated Fan Hub, Powering up to 10 fans (3-pin or 4pin) with PWM, Occupying only One 4-pin Motherboard Header ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $441.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-18 16:47 EDT-0400




And for reference in case you were interested in something with a little more power and pizazz



PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($62.99 @ Newegg Business)
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($108.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 750 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($53.98 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Other: DEEPCOOL FH-10 Integrated Fan Hub, Powering up to 10 fans (3-pin or 4pin) with PWM, Occupying only One 4-pin Motherboard Header ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $608.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-18 16:49 EDT-0400
 
Apr 16, 2019
12
0
10
Best answers
0
If you are just looking to see what it'll be to build from scratch (while keeping the GPU and storage from your old system) then here you go.

Keep in mind that I've already picked the best options for retailers for you.

Also keep in mind that the price you see is retail, and does not include taxes.

And I chose a competent but cheap case because from what I understand you are trying to spend as little money as possible.

If the case you currently have is a good one with good airflow, then save money and don't get a new case.

Also keep in mind, this build is me keeping it as cheap as possible but without being absolutely as cheap as possible (basically choosing parts that are just a couple dollars more, but are of better quality and worth the money)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.99 @ B&H)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($84.67 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($30.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.24 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12III 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Other: DEEPCOOL FH-10 Integrated Fan Hub, Powering up to 10 fans (3-pin or 4pin) with PWM, Occupying only One 4-pin Motherboard Header ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $441.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-18 16:47 EDT-0400




And for reference in case you were interested in something with a little more power and pizazz



PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($78.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($62.99 @ Newegg Business)
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($108.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 750 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($53.98 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Fractal Design - X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.01 @ Amazon)
Other: DEEPCOOL FH-10 Integrated Fan Hub, Powering up to 10 fans (3-pin or 4pin) with PWM, Occupying only One 4-pin Motherboard Header ($9.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $608.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-18 16:49 EDT-0400
I’m probably going with the second option. Why do I need 3 fans? Aren’t there fans on the case or built in them?
 

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