Question Help with broken PC

Jun 28, 2019
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I was playing some old games today (BF2, CS 1.6, Quake) when my PC randomly decided to crash, I thought oh well I’ll just reboot, but upon reboot I got a blue screen saying that there was a thread stuck in device driver not sure exactly what it said, I tried to restart, refresh, reboot and restore to a previous date but in all instances it either failed at the end or flat out said it can’t wipe any data. Anything related to removing data doesn’t work, and pressing the delete key and any F1-12 key did nothing when booting up. The only thing I can access that might help is the command prompt, however “systemreset” isn’t recognized or usable. Specs:
AMD Radeon rx 560,
16GB DDR3 memory
AMD FX 6300 processor
Windows 10 Home
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS.

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and even informational entries that correspond with the time of the crashes.
 
Jun 28, 2019
9
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10
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Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS.

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and even informational entries that correspond with the time of the crashes.
how would I go about checking those? Currently all I can really access is the cmd prompt, havent’t checked any of the debug, driver signature enforcement disable, early launch malware protection disable ir automatic restart
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You should be able to get to either Reliability History or Event Viewer by typing the tool's name into the "Type here to search" box.

However, reading back, you are not even able to get into Safe Mode - is that correct?

Motherboard: make, model, version?

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

No beeps or diagnostic LED's?
 
Jun 28, 2019
9
0
10
0
You should be able to get to either Reliability History or Event Viewer by typing the tool's name into the "Type here to search" box.

However, reading back, you are not even able to get into Safe Mode - is that correct?

Motherboard: make, model, version?

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

No beeps or diagnostic LED's?
the motherboard seems to be a gigabyte GA-78LMTUSB3 R2? And the psu is unknown as where I purchased the computer it was not stated, it’s from cyberpower and is only a little over a year old, and yes, I cannot boot into any form of safe mode, and the only strange noise I’ve heard so far can only be explained as some kind of optical drive powering on but I have no disc drive in the PC. Doing sfc verify only says that there is integrity violations and using more in cmd to look at the log given it’s all basically hieroglyphic to me.
 

Ketchup79

Notable
Aug 7, 2019
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You can make a Windows 10 installer on a USB flash drive, and during the install tell it to keep your old files, which will go into a Windows.old folder. What I fear is that a piece of hardware in the computer is failing, but it's very hard to tell at this point.
 
Jun 28, 2019
9
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You can make a Windows 10 installer on a USB flash drive, and during the install tell it to keep your old files, which will go into a Windows.old folder. What I fear is that a piece of hardware in the computer is failing, but it's very hard to tell at this point.
I created a windows 10 recovery usb drive from a working PC, on my boot menu it’s a single page with an LS120, Hard Disk, CDROM, ZIP, USB-FDD, USB-ZIP, USB-HDD and Legacy LAN. currently the CDROM, Hard Disk and LS120 boot to a BSOD. Which one if not already tried would be the USB drive?
 
Jun 28, 2019
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With the way it's formatted, either USB CDROM or USB HDD should work.
it looks like USB-HDD wants to boot the recovery drive but it still BSOD’s so it most likely is a failing psu, seeing as many people online say that cyberpower has faulty psus. But I’m not sure that would explain the inability to reset the pc at all and integrity violations reported by sfc /verifyonly.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Computer components are very sensitive to voltage changes. It does not take much of a voltage change to cause problems. And there are often some voltage tolerance allowances to minimize or even negate the impact of minor changes.

However, two things can happen: 1) The PSU becomes increasingly unable to control its output voltages, and 2) the served components can become less tolerant of voltage changes.

So a blip in the power to a disk drive while writing a file can result in file corruption and the accompanying integrity violations.

And the very nature of it all is that the problems may, at first, be intermittent or inconsistent. Anything else may be more dramatic with sparks, smoke, burning, etc.. But sometimes nothing other than a small, unnoticeable pop. Or whiff of burned insulation.

Two suggested readings:

https://www.lifewire.com/power-supply-unit-2618158

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Read the links to learn more about PSUs. And there are many other similar links if you desire to learn more. Overall goal being that what you read and learn may help you narrow down and identify a specific problem.

Not suggesting per se that you test the PSU as described but there would be no harm in doing so. If you do not have a multimeter find a knowledgeable family member or friend to help. The testing is not complete in scope as the voltages are not tested under load.

You may discover one or more voltages out of spec which leads back to the voltage being the source/cause of the problem.
 

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