Question Help with liquid spill

May 20, 2019
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So,

I accidentally spilled juice on the top of my pc and eventually ended up seeping into my case. Most of it ended up on top or under, but a very minute amount landed inside. This happened while it was on but I turned it off and unplugged before my PC showed any visible signs of effect. I dried what I could see with a paper towel and wiped it down what was sticky with isopropyl and alcohol. Now, my PC refuses to turn on. The liquid made contact with my GPU and perhaps my PSU, but this is less likely and if so, it was a very small amount. Not a single drop touched the motherboard. The first time I tried to power it on after a day, the LEDs on my PSU blinked for about half a second before shutting off, I don’t know what this indicates. No fans or anything, but idk if it’s because the PC is shutting off before they can power on. Can anybody guess the state of my computer and recommended advice for repair? There are no visible signs of damage, but has it short circuited?

I’m hoping that at the least it’s a PSU failure. I can provide specs if it’ll help.
 
May 20, 2019
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No smell coming from the PSU, can’t discern any particular smell when close to it. Any idea how strong the smell should be, especially after a day and a half? Gave it another wipe and will wait a day or two before trying to turn on again.
 

AllanGH

Commendable
Mar 10, 2019
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On any liquid spill that has the chance that it may have gotten inside the case, the default reaction should be an instant power-down & unplug, then a complete dissassembly, inspection, and liquid removal of the entire system. Before even plugging it in again.
 
May 20, 2019
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I did do my best to dry and clean every component in my desktop. There could be some sugar residue, but again, I did look for that and tried to clean it. However, I’m afraid that any damage has already been done and I would like to isolate it quickly or see if there’s any way of fixing it.
 

AllanGH

Commendable
Mar 10, 2019
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Honestly, you need to pull everything out of the case, and breadboard the entire build on an insulated surface.

Absolutely anything that plugs into anything else needs to be unplugged, unseated, removed, whatever, and inspected closely and cleaned up.

Something got someplace where you didn't look before trying to start it up. You need to find that out and repair/replace as necessary. You won't know what it is until you do the work to discover the root of the problem.
 
May 20, 2019
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Will try to breadboard the system soon to find out if any other parts have been affected, but for now I’ve tried to test the PSU by connecting the green and black pins on the 24 pin connector, however case fans did not run, the LEDs flickered like they did when trying to power them on, and it produced a burning smell as previously mentioned which I am now afraid of. Hopefully it hasn’t killed anything else.
 

AllanGH

Commendable
Mar 10, 2019
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Sure sounds like you're in the market for a new PSU.

The only thing you can do is replace it and see how things go, but do inspect that system meticulously before powering it up with the new PSU, though. You don't want to make things worse.
 
May 20, 2019
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UPDATE:

New PSU came in, unfortunately, seems other components went with the old one. Refuses to turn on plugged in, but passes the paper clip test. It seems like the motherboard is fried, maybe even the GPU. Wishful thinking, but I hope at the very least it’s only the motherboard. It’s probably the hardest thing to replace, but the GPU will be the most expensive. Might have to take it into a shop and find out if there’s anything that can be fixed or to find out precisely what I will need to replace.
 
May 20, 2019
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UPDATE #2:

Upon further testing, it would appear that the motherboard is in working condition. The problem lies with the GPU. Motherboard powers on with new PSU and GPU removed, it appears the CPU, etc. function correctly. Upon further inspection of the GPU, I think I found signs of corrosion, but I’m not entirely sure. Either way, it’ll be a pricey component to replace, unfortunately, however at least I’ve narrowed it down.
 

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