Question Help with replacing thermal paste in my Lenovo laptop

May 7, 2021
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Hello so my Lenovo IdeaPad 3 15ARE05 is currently dealing with some heating issues, as is some most laptops. Problem appears to be the CPU overheating, as my laptop stutters suddenly when I am in the middle of a game, or randomly unexpectedly. Checked my temps with Afterburner and noticed that my temps are waaaaay too high. MSIAB my laptop's temps range from 60-70C at idle, then around 90C when during in game, and in the cases it reaches 100C, is the stuttering starts. Which iirc is the failsafe by the CPU inorder to not damage the component when it reaches around that temperature. I had to look into some solutions such as having optimal air flow, which my laptop does as the stand it's on has an open bottom, I opened up the back and blew air into everything and the fans. The only solution left that I have is by replacing the thermal paste inside it, which I do not how to do so.

SIDE NOTE: I had upgraded my RAM to 20gb about 4-5 months ago, idk if that is part of the problem, but it seemed like the stuttering and overheating issues were prominent way before then.

I do not know which specific type of thermal paste to buy for my specific laptop, nor the instructions on how to remove the fan "block" inorder to access the CPU and the paste. Any videos or instructions on how to do so for my specific laptop? And which thermal paste do I buy so I could replace it.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Oddly enough seeing temps for that APU in your laptop is normal. It's only when you go to 105 Deg C or above is when you'll need to be concerned. Since you're asking for suggestions on thermal paste, you should follow this guide in disassembling the laptop;
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hx6ICwjDDoQ


Mind you, your laptop might be slightly different to the one in the video but the guide should generally be the same, disassemble the laptop, remove the cooling assembly(after disconnecting the power sources) and then remove thermal paste with Isopropyl alcohol and then reapply a small bead of high quality thermal paste and then reassemble the laptop.

Where are you located?
 
May 7, 2021
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Im from Philippines, but anywhere from SEA that I could probably buy from online.

As for the video, where is the CPU there? I had already disassembled by laptop before because I had cleaned it thoroughly and had upgrade my RAM already. Is it also necessary to remove the SSD and the battery when doin that? Because I didn't when I had replaced my RAM
 

geofelt

Titan
The benefit from replacing thermal paste is more hope than reality.
Paste may take 5 years to become ineffective.
Still, the initial application may have been less than optimal.
Consider the risk/reward of changing paste.
Laptops are delicate and it is easy to strip screws or otherwise screw things up.

You did well to see that airflow is good.

My stock commentary on laptop gaming performance:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I see many complaints about gaming laptops not performing well.
Usually gaming while plugged in.
One common cause is thermal throttling.
Laptop coolers must, of necessity be small and light.
The coolers are also relatively underpowered.
If you run an app such as HWMonitor or HWinfo, you will get the current, minimum, and maximum cpu temperatures.
For intel processors, if you see a max of 100c. it means you have throttled.
The cpu will lower it's multiplier and power draw to protect itself
until the situation reverses.
At a lower multiplier, your cpu usage may well be at 100%
What can you do?
First, see that your cooler airways are clear and that the cooler fan is spinning.
Use a windows balanced power profile, not the performance profile.
Set a minimum cpu performance to something like 20%

It is counter-intuitive, but, try changing the windows balanced power profile advanced functions to a max of 90% instead of the default of 100%
You may not notice the reduced cpu performance.
 

keith12

Illustrious
Im from Philippines, but anywhere from SEA that I could probably buy from online.

As for the video, where is the CPU there? I had already disassembled by laptop before because I had cleaned it thoroughly and had upgrade my RAM already. Is it also necessary to remove the SSD and the battery when doin that? Because I didn't when I had replaced my RAM
The CPU/iGPU is underneath the end of the heat pipes which comes from the fan.

View: https://imgur.com/DzvSbX5


There are 4 screws holding it place there. You may have to disassemble the fan, which is straight forward, just make sure to unclip the little power lead before you remove it. The fan assembly may be screwed to the heat pipe. Make sure to keep all the screws together in a cup so you don't lose any when disassembling.

In terms of re-pasting and what paste to use: Well, yes, it is a good idea, and will give results. The difference between the generic paste used by manufacturers and the higher end stuff you can purchase is night and day!

Ill give my own laptop as an example (and having done the same for a lot of my friends too). I tried a few different pastes over the stock stuff on my HP Omen 15. With the standard paste, the CPU would hit 95c on a heavy gaming session, and would potentially throttle. GPU, not so much. It would hit about 70-75c max.

I first tried Arctic MX-4. With great results. I was very impressed. It dropped CPU temps at long gaming load down to about 85-90c. This stopped my CPU from throttling immediately. I then tried Noctua NT H1, and the results were even better. Full load temps at 75-85c max. This is a huge difference in terms of how laptop cooling works. My CPU was boosting higher, and for longer, and all the while the fans are actually not ramping up to 100% which is much better than the previous constant whirring at full load. Re-pasting is most certainly worth the effort.

@Lutfij gave some good suggestions on the process. I would only add that when replacing the heat pipes back over the CPU, put the screws back in, in a criss cross fashion. From one diagonal to the other. This will ensure an even spread of the paste when it's screwed back on.
 
May 7, 2021
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Another question, I have to remove the already applied paste before I could apply the new one, correct? How would I do that. Also how would I apply the correct way and the correct amount for it
 

keith12

Illustrious
Another question, I have to remove the already applied paste before I could apply the new one, correct? How would I do that. Also how would I apply the correct way and the correct amount for it
@Lutfij already mentioned it.

disassemble the laptop, remove the cooling assembly(after disconnecting the power sources) and then remove thermal paste with Isopropyl alcohol and then reapply a small bead of high quality thermal paste and then reassemble the laptop.
It's best to use ISO as it's 99% alcohol, which will evaporate quickly after application. Simply use non-lint cloth with a splash of ISO and rub off the old paste. The small bead will spread out over the CPU as you put the heatpipes back on. The bead you put on the CPU sould be in the middle, and should be a 'pea' sized blob. The past you choose will provide instructions for best application, but the bead method is arguably the way to go.
 
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