Question High CPU Temp

Aug 25, 2019
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Hi everyone my first post here, i searched a lot in internet and was unable to find any thing reliable so i turned into here, so basically what's happening to my CPU is whenever i play games every software shows reading of about 90°C while i quickly restarted my computer to see what my MOBO says it instead of giving reading near 90 it says 60°C so what's wrong here, i tried a bunch of software all seems to give same readings and my MOBO says diff.
 

Dunlop0078

Polypheme
Herald
Specs?

The CPU is going to get a lot hotter under load in a game than it will be at idle in the mobo bios. 60c idle and 90c load temp is quite bad I would assume your cooler is not mounted properly and/or you used to little or no thermal paste between the CPU and cooler.
 
Aug 25, 2019
7
0
10
0
Specs?

The CPU is going to get a lot hotter under load in a game than it will be at idle in the mobo bios. 60c idle and 90c load temp is quite bad I would assume your cooler is not mounted properly and/or you used to little or no thermal paste between the CPU and cooler.
Here is my spec
I3-2120(Currently running with Stock cooler)
6 GB DDR3 1333 Mhz
GT 1030 (Not OC)
And 1TB HDD
i think there is no problem with the thermal paste as i cleaned my PC and reapplied it today and perfectly as instructed and is mounted perfectly with MOBO so no problem there the main thing is should i prefer the MOBO's Data or Software's Data both seems to give very different results and that 60°C is temp given by motherboard just 15 secs after gaming so it should be near temp given by SOFTWARES
but instead its far diff. so what should i do prefer the MOBO temp or should i think my CPU is overheating
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
... i3-2120(Currently running with Stock cooler) ... i cleaned my PC and reapplied it today ... MOBO's Data or Software's Data both seems to give very different results and that 60°C is temp given by motherboard just 15 secs after gaming so it should be near temp given by SOFTWARES ...
Not quite ... Both are correct.

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Core temperatures respond instantly to changes in load.

Intel’s specification for Digital Thermal Sensors (DTS) response time, which are the sensors that measure each Core temperature, is 256 milliseconds, or about 1/4th of a second. The instant that a workload is applied to the processor's Cores, the temperature for each Core instantly responds to the load, so there is no "gradual" increase in temperatures such as an oven warming up.

The reverse is true when a workload stops. The Cores then instantly cool to within about 10% of their normal idle values. That remaining 10% takes a little longer. By the time you can shut down and reboot into BIOS, the processor has long since cooled down.

However, keep in mind that BIOS is not "idle", as none of the power saving features are active, regardless of whether they're enabled or not. Power saving features enabled in BIOS are active in Windows, so minimum "idle" temperatures occur when "Idle" is really idle.

Many users don't understand the meaning of "idle", and instead assume since they've never seen a definition for it, then idle must be any condition when they aren't running a load.

"Idle" means an undisturbed condition with no programs or screen saver running, and off line. No Folding or SETI or "tray-trash" running in the background, and just 1 or 2% CPU Utilization under the "Performance" tab in Windows Task Manager.

Here's an example of clean and quiet idle:



Under normal idle conditions, processor idle temperatures in Windows is always lower than CPU temperature in BIOS.

The numerical values of processor Core temperatures can only tell you so much. The actual thermal behaviors becomes much easier to understand when you observe the Core temperatures on a chart or graph:



Concerning your high Core temperatures, Dunlop0078's assessment is very likely correct.

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for users having much difficulty with getting the problematic "push-pins" fully inserted completely through the motherboard and properly latched. It's an extremely common problem which has happened to the best and most experienced users.

No disrespect intended toward your expertise or abilities, but here's a brief video for installing Intel's stock coolers:


If you'd like to get yourself up to speed, we have a Guide on this topic. It's a "Sticky" located at the top of the CPUs Forum where you posted your thread. If you take a look up there you can't miss it: Intel Temperature Guide - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
 

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