Hitachi Ships Industry's Fastest 10K RPM HDD

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jerreece

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Interesting. Would love to see performance data compared to the new SSD's just for giggles. Plus knowing the retail price would be nice too. This could be an exciting product, or it could be a waste depending on price vs performance compared with SSDs.
 

icepick314

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[citation][nom]eklipz330[/nom]anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...[/citation]

main reason would be cost per GB...

SSD is FAST but most people won't be able to afford anything bigger than 128GB...

with magnetic drives, you still have fast access especially in RAID while having 300GB or more while having price that's more affordable than SSD....
 
The only advantage that 10k rpm drives is sequential writes and slightly faster access times but that is all. The spindle motors are what worry me. For servers it is best to do a raid of just a few SSD for paging and os then leave mechanical for storage in another raid.
 

mikem_90

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[citation][nom]nforce4max[/nom]The only advantage that 10k rpm drives is sequential writes and slightly faster access times but that is all. The spindle motors are what worry me. For servers it is best to do a raid of just a few SSD for paging and os then leave mechanical for storage in another raid.[/citation]

Most of the 10k RPM and Server drives in general I've seen tend to last a good long while. Old ones might whine a bit, but so did the server drives back in the 90s that were 5400 and 7200 rpms. Heck, I still have some old SCSI drives from back then that still work.
 

w3k3m

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[citation][nom]eklipz330[/nom]anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...[/citation]

The difference in price is huge. You shouldn't compare it with standard MLC based SSDs, as MLC based SSD would degrade very quickly with an enterprise server usage pattern. For the price of an SLC based SSD with comparable capacity and performance, you can probably buy a brand new (small) car. Not many companies are ready to shell out that much money.


Not many companies would
 

gmarsack

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[citation][nom]eklipz330[/nom]anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...[/citation]
Databases. No way are SSD (currently) going to survive the random reads/writes of a large database with multiple connections. SSD's are not designed for this application. Other than that though, not much.... lol
 

tu_illegalamigo

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[citation][nom]gmarsack[/nom]Databases. No way are SSD (currently) going to survive the random reads/writes of a large database with multiple connections. SSD's are not designed for this application. Other than that though, not much.... lol[/citation]

Absolutely, the ideal solution is usually a mix in my experience. With both deployed together you get a good rounded solution when it comes to accessing and storing data and still having a foot in both doors, so to speak.
 

Marco925

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[citation][nom]eklipz330[/nom]anyone want to clarify why someone would want this over an SSD? Is price the only problem? the new sandforce drives are around the corner...[/citation]
Some people aren't so capable of maintaining an SSD drive. they wouldn't know to move the random read-write operations to a platter drive, for those types of people, it's perfect.
 

borisof007

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[citation][nom]tu_illegalamigo[/nom]Absolutely, the ideal solution is usually a mix in my experience. With both deployed together you get a good rounded solution when it comes to accessing and storing data and still having a foot in both doors, so to speak.[/citation]

I have a candidate that worked at Samsung, he is a SQL DBA. They were testing prototype database setups using FULL SSD solutions. He said they were blazing fast, but you'd have to hot swap SSD's because they would die out after a while.
 

blarneypete

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[citation][nom]thillntn[/nom]Brand name still scares me, I know this is a new product but I have replaced countless hitachi drives in the past....[/citation]Hitachi consumer drives are poo, but their enterprise drives are very high quality.
[citation][nom]physical[/nom]I would like to see a benchmark throwdown between this and a WD Velociraptor.[/citation]Velociraptor is fast, but I wager when you throw it in as a contender against proper server-class SAS drives, it will lose by a fair margin.
 

thillntn

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Ou can thumbs down me all you want,but after the whole scsi firmware issue I went cheetah and didn't look back.kudos if 10 years later they got it right.
 

toughbook

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[citation][nom]tu_illegalamigo[/nom]Anyone on here own an SLC SSD? not me[/citation]

I do. I have a Intel 32GBSSDSLCG1 that I have my W7 OS on. Runs like an Intel is built to run. I have a total of 5 SSD'S in my aresnal, I would never consider going back to spinners. That is like listening to a great tune on a cassette then hearing it on a CD. After doing so, you would never put yourself thru that again. These companies are trying to hang on to the traditional HDD's as long as they can, there demise is not far off. Just wait and see what 2011 brings us!
I will admit this though. Of all the HDD'S I used to use, I never had 1 Hitachi go bad on me. That is who Panasonic uses in there Toughbooks if you don't choose the SSD option. Panny must know something when you look at there failure rate compared to the plastic throwaway laptops produced for the mass market these days.
 
Quite a few SLC SSDs out there and the prices are way above the MLC
RealSSD P300
OCZ Agility EX 60GB SLC SSD
OCZSSD2-1VTXEX120G
Intel's 32GB SLC SSD ( Enterprise Class)
Ridata SLC SSD

Are just a few of them
 

Wamphryi

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I am always keen to adopt new technology especially performance technology. I do not agree however that we will see the end of the HDD anytime soon. As long as people require large capacity cheap media then the HDD will be there. Work PC's do not require SSD's and nor do budget machines for home users. Servers have requirements not suited to SSD technology and external back up drives are amply served by the HDD. Velicoraptors deliver excellent real world performance and it sounds like this Hitachi will do the same.
 

w3k3m

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[citation][nom]Wamphryi[/nom]I am always keen to adopt new technology especially performance technology. I do not agree however that we will see the end of the HDD anytime soon.[/citation]

Right.
People forget that SSDs are semiconductor-based storage devices.
We are reaching the limits of semiconductor miniaturization and the development will actually slow down(unless someone invent some new revolutionary semiconductor physics, which is very unlikely in next 20 years or so). Even the recent SSD developments (like Sandforce) are more or less trickery (compresssion etc.) and not something fundamental - you have always some drawbacks, need to steadily maintain the drive etc, etc.
No one serious thinks that SSDs will replace classical HDDs (for a mass storage). The real successor is expected to come from new developments in Spintronics research, which has way more potential.
 
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