Question Home networking setup help

Sep 28, 2020
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Hello guys,
I am not entirely sure how to do this, so would appreciate help.
My family just renovated our home, and I made sure there's LAN connection in every room. Still, for some devices you need wifi. We have an internet connection coming into home in a place, where it would be pointless to put wifi router. So what I would love to have is just a simple router taking care of the LAN connections + 2-3 APs around home so that we have good coverage everywhere.
So my understanding is (and pls correct me if I am wrong) that to get a home AP, I just get any wifi router and set it to AP mode. What I don't know is how do I make sure all 3 APs work as one network (one SSID)? Do I just name the SSIDs the same? Won't it create any conflicts? Anything else I should worry about?
Cheers for help!
PS I don't necessarily want to use the repeaters, not sure I actually can, the main router is in the basement, wifi from there would probably get nowhere, so there's nothing to repeat...
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hello guys,
I am not entirely sure how to do this, so would appreciate help.
My family just renovated our home, and I made sure there's LAN connection in every room. Still, for some devices you need wifi. We have an internet connection coming into home in a place, where it would be pointless to put wifi router. So what I would love to have is just a simple router taking care of the LAN connections + 2-3 APs around home so that we have good coverage everywhere.
So my understanding is (and pls correct me if I am wrong) that to get a home AP, I just get any wifi router and set it to AP mode. What I don't know is how do I make sure all 3 APs work as one network (one SSID)? Do I just name the SSIDs the same? Won't it create any conflicts? Anything else I should worry about?
Cheers for help!
PS I don't necessarily want to use the repeaters, not sure I actually can, the main router is in the basement, wifi from there would probably get nowhere, so there's nothing to repeat...
Yes you can do what you describe. You need to have hardware that you can TURN DOWN the transmit power on those APs. That is what tunes your WIFI.
If you have the same SSID and password on all the units, theoretically a device should be able to connect to any WIFI source. If you want simplified management, then you would look at the Ubiquiti UniFI system. It has routers, switches and APs that all can be managed from a single portal.

I had a network like you describe and have upgraded to Ubiquiti.
 
Reactions: Kormiii
Sep 28, 2020
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My recommendation to you would be to invest in a mesh router setup. It does what you are looking to do but you can scale it up if you need to. 1 is a router and you can add APs to it as needed.

Here is an example of one-https://www.tp-link.com/us/deco-mesh-wifi/

This will keep you from creating separate APs with the same SSID causing potential problems for your devices. A potential problem would be a device jumping back and forth between 2 AP's because the signal strength may go up and down in a certain area. New Asus routers allow you to turn a mesh like system on between other asus routers. Something to consider.

Hope this helps.
 
Reactions: Kormiii

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
My recommendation to you would be to invest in a mesh router setup. It does what you are looking to do but you can scale it up if you need to. 1 is a router and you can add APs to it as needed.

Here is an example of one-https://www.tp-link.com/us/deco-mesh-wifi/

This will keep you from creating separate APs with the same SSID causing potential problems for your devices. A potential problem would be a device jumping back and forth between 2 AP's because the signal strength may go up and down in a certain area. New Asus routers allow you to turn a mesh like system on between other asus routers. Something to consider.

Hope this helps.
A "mesh" system uses WIFI for backhaul between satellites and base. Mesh doesn't do anything to fix a device moving between WIFI sources. Tuning transmit power on the WIFI sources is what fixes that.

Having "separate APs" is not a bad thing, IF the hardware allows you to turn down the transmit power.
 
Sep 28, 2020
3
0
10
0
Yes you can do what you describe. You need to have hardware that you can TURN DOWN the transmit power on those APs. That is what tunes your WIFI.
If you have the same SSID and password on all the units, theoretically a device should be able to connect to any WIFI source. If you want simplified management, then you would look at the Ubiquiti UniFI system. It has routers, switches and APs that all can be managed from a single portal.

I had a network like you describe and have upgraded to Ubiquiti.
Thanks for the advice, will look into Ubiqiti!
 
Sep 28, 2020
3
0
10
0
My recommendation to you would be to invest in a mesh router setup. It does what you are looking to do but you can scale it up if you need to. 1 is a router and you can add APs to it as needed.

Here is an example of one-https://www.tp-link.com/us/deco-mesh-wifi/

This will keep you from creating separate APs with the same SSID causing potential problems for your devices. A potential problem would be a device jumping back and forth between 2 AP's because the signal strength may go up and down in a certain area. New Asus routers allow you to turn a mesh like system on between other asus routers. Something to consider.

Hope this helps.
Thanks buddy, looking at that mesh thingie already ;-)
 
Sep 28, 2020
6
2
25
1
A "mesh" system uses WIFI for backhaul between satellites and base. Mesh doesn't do anything to fix a device moving between WIFI sources. Tuning transmit power on the WIFI sources is what fixes that.

Having "separate APs" is not a bad thing, IF the hardware allows you to turn down the transmit power.
The point of a MESH setup is so your devices do not drop when moving from one AP to the next. This is a good option for homes and specifically homes that have multi-levels or have odd layouts. Central place to manage the WIFI and AP's

Ubiquity is great for business use but a bit on the expensive side for someone's home IMO.

No, having separate AP's is not a bad thing but i am not sure if its any better then just putting money into a Mesh setup.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
The point of a MESH setup is so your devices do not drop when moving from one AP to the next.
That is an incorrect statement. MESH is using wireless connectivity for the satellites. It is an incorrectly used term because of the marketing that the companies of mesh systems. They imply that the only way to get roaming between WIFI sources is through THEIR mesh system. The device chooses the WIFI to connect to. Mesh system may support features like 802.11r or 802.11k (fast roaming) that you don't get from using routers as access points.
BUT, WIFI was not designed for seamless roaming. If it works, it is a bonus. But it isn't guaranteed by the specs.
 
Sep 28, 2020
6
2
25
1
That is an incorrect statement. MESH is using wireless connectivity for the satellites. It is an incorrectly used term because of the marketing that the companies of mesh systems. They imply that the only way to get roaming between WIFI sources is through THEIR mesh system. The device chooses the WIFI to connect to. Mesh system may support features like 802.11r or 802.11k (fast roaming) that you don't get from using routers as access points.
BUT, WIFI was not designed for seamless roaming. If it works, it is a bonus. But it isn't guaranteed by the specs.
Perhaps the terms are incorrectly used, i would have to look further into that but I do have a mesh network in my home and have great coverage on all levels of my home. My home is weird in that it has 4 separate floors and WIFI coverage was an issue. I did use 3 different routers with 2 in AP mode but a device moving from 1 to another would cause a bit of buffering or in a worst case scenario, a drop where i would have to refresh a browser. Not that big of a deal if you are not moving around the home but inconvenient enough for me to want to look for another solution.

For the OP, In my experience the Mesh setups work well. I have setup some Tplink Deco, Google Nest, and Netgear Orbi devices. They are easy to setup, easy to manage and I have yet to experience an issue. To me that is easier for someone who may not have a lot of experience setting such things up.

Kanewolf is NOT wrong, what he recommends will also work.
 
Reactions: Kormiii

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