jedimasterben

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Sep 22, 2007
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So I just ordered 20 carats worth of diamond powder, and I am awaiting an email about a tube of silicon grease.

I figured I'd give it a shot after reading this article a few days ago.

Has anyone else ever thought about giving this a shot?

I'd be very interested to see what it does to my Xeon (usually hovers around 80C during huge SupCom matches) and for my newly purchased 4870 VaporX.
 

AngeloR93

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Oct 27, 2008
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Give it a shot when you do please post the results this is pretty interesting.I maybe would try it but right now my system is pretty cool
 

orangegator

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Interesting. But the results seem pretty unbelievable. It supposedly idles 13C lower than AS5 and loads 16C lower. Even commercial diamond thermal paste doesn't perform that well. Most reviews I've seen say that Shin-etsu and other top of the line thermal pastes only perform about 5C better than AS5.
 

Kithzaru

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I would think you're still limited by ambient temp and the surface area of the cooler itself... you're not going to drop your CPU lower than your house lol
 
It's been done(sold) already: http://www.heatsinkfactory.com/ic-diamond-7-carat-thermal-compound-15-gram-p-16605.html

And here are the results:
Summary.png

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=232141

And post results!
 

jedimasterben

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Sep 22, 2007
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Thanks for posting that, Shadow, it was a very good read.

I considered buying the IC diamond stuff, but I figured that I'd spend a little more just to be able to say that I mixed it up myself!

And I'll definitely post some results once I get it all here, mixed, and applied!
 

lalitv74

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The dysfunctor has spotted an impressive project over on InventGeek(DOT)com; an innovative chap has developed his own thermal compound for improved CPU cooling, using diamond powders — the best available material for thermal conduction — as the key ingredient. In spite of the quick-&-dirty DIY nature of the project, the gains in cooling performance are remarkable, especially considering the material cost was only $33. Given the price many enthusiasts will pay for a top-end cooler, it's easy to imagine this product coming to market quite soon.