Discussion How can I set up my new Thin Client for personal use?

Sep 12, 2022
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I just purchased a Dell Wyse Thin Client and I would really appreciate some assistance on how to set it up as my personal computer. The model is Dell Wyse 5070. Thanks in advance!🙏
 

Eximo

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It would make for a pretty terrible PC, but I don't think there is anything stopping you from putting Linux or something light on it. Looks like Dell also offers standard Windows drivers for it.

Normal use case would be to have a VM or server running that would be running the OS the thin client would normally connect to.

Celeron J with a 32GB eMMC flash, I have a similar product running Windows 10, it is usable for basic tasks and web browsing, a little video playback, but it is quickly overwhelmed on many websites.
 
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kanewolf

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I just purchased a Dell Wyse Thin Client and I would really appreciate some assistance on how to set it up as my personal computer. The model is Dell Wyse 5070. Thanks in advance!🙏
You start by having a server that is what is actually hosting your PC, then you use the Dell to remote into it.
Thin clients are not equivalent to PCs. They don't have local storage to hold an OS. They are designed to be used a a terminal to another computer.
 

Eximo

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You start by having a server that is what is actually hosting your PC, then you use the Dell to remote into it.
Thin clients are not equivalent to PCs. They don't have local storage to hold an OS. They are designed to be used a a terminal to another computer.
In the old days, that would be true. A real Wyse terminal was essentially a network attached display that stored only the most basic information locally to boot and connect to the network.

Modern thin clients are just very lightweight PCs since there isn't a driving need for devices that can actually boot off a network and nothing else. In this case they run an OS designed to connect to a server to retrieve a domain environment and settings.

Looks like Dell fully supports using this thin client as a desktop, but it won't be fun. 32GB of slow flash memory is what it has for storage, so the OS has to be kept light. The processor is as weak as they come, since all the processing is intended to be server side, and it has very limited memory. All embedded, non-upgradeable.

I have a Lenovo ThinkCentre Stick (aka ThinkStick) with a similar level of hardware, just comes in a 2 x 6 cm package and only has a single USB port, but Wifi and bluetooth. Windows 10 64 bit full install works, but major updates are a chore (lack of space) and running anything beyond the basics is out of the question.
 

kanewolf

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In the old days, that would be true. A real Wyse terminal was essentially a network attached display that stored only the most basic information locally to boot and connect to the network.

Modern thin clients are just very lightweight PCs since there isn't a driving need for devices that can actually boot off a network and nothing else. In this case they run an OS designed to connect to a server to retrieve a domain environment and settings.

Looks like Dell fully supports using this thin client as a desktop, but it won't be fun. 32GB of slow flash memory is what it has for storage, so the OS has to be kept light. The processor is as weak as they come, since all the processing is intended to be server side, and it has very limited memory. All embedded, non-upgradeable.

I have a Lenovo ThinkCentre Stick (aka ThinkStick) with a similar level of hardware, just comes in a 2 x 6 cm package and only has a single USB port, but Wifi and bluetooth. Windows 10 64 bit full install works, but major updates are a chore (lack of space) and running anything beyond the basics is out of the question.
32GB of flash is not a "desktop", IMO. It has enough space for remote client software, but not a USEFUL OS install.
 
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Eximo

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32GB of flash is not a "desktop", IMO. It has enough space for remote client software, but not a USEFUL OS install.
Okay?

They still sell laptops with 32GB eMMC storage. I'm not saying it is a good idea, just that it is possible. You can add external storage, but about the only thing going on to the boot drive is the OS.

It is enough for full Windows 10, and probably 11, though the latter's graphics might be a little too high for the iGPU. Not sure how much of that can be turned off.
Plenty of Linux distros way smaller than that as well that are perfectly serviceable for basic use.
 

kanewolf

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Okay?

They still sell laptops with 32GB eMMC storage. I'm not saying it is a good idea, just that it is possible. You can add external storage, but about the only thing going on to the boot drive is the OS.

It is enough for full Windows 10, and probably 11, though the latter's graphics might be a little too high for the iGPU. Not sure how much of that can be turned off.
Plenty of Linux distros way smaller than that as well that are perfectly serviceable for basic use.
You and I will disagree on the usefulness of thin clients as PCs and maybe as thin client hardware in general.
Even the prescribed usage for thin clients takes a LOT of resources on the backend to do it well. Yes, I have architected thin client systems for operations. The costs per seat compared to traditional PCs was not there when all costs were included. Maybe our use-case was not appropriate. Remote access on a normal PC to a citrix environment works quite well, but thin client hardware ... PASS.
 
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Sep 12, 2022
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0
10
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In the old days, that would be true. A real Wyse terminal was essentially a network attached display that stored only the most basic information locally to boot and connect to the network.

Modern thin clients are just very lightweight PCs since there isn't a driving need for devices that can actually boot off a network and nothing else. In this case they run an OS designed to connect to a server to retrieve a domain environment and settings.

Looks like Dell fully supports using this thin client as a desktop, but it won't be fun. 32GB of slow flash memory is what it has for storage, so the OS has to be kept light. The processor is as weak as they come, since all the processing is intended to be server side, and it has very limited memory. All embedded, non-upgradeable.

I have a Lenovo ThinkCentre Stick (aka ThinkStick) with a similar level of hardware, just comes in a 2 x 6 cm package and only has a single USB port, but Wifi and bluetooth. Windows 10 64 bit full install works, but major updates are a chore (lack of space) and running anything beyond the basics is out of the question.


Thank you so much for confirming that it would not be a good PC to set up. Thanks again!
 

punkncat

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Considering what you paid and that it's already on the way, probably worth loading Linux or a lite OS on it just to see what your tolerance for it is. I have installed Lubuntu to some of the older netbook products with things like Atom processors and they were usable for simple surfing like checking the news or the weather. In most cases I have found even modern YouTube videos to be too much to run in anything but the small default view.

If you can return it, look around for some of the Dell Optiplex SFF systems. Pricing should be about the same for something 5th gen or so.
 
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Eximo

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For $30 it is a fun toy.

Mine fits in my pocket and I can technically connect it to anything with an HDMI input. Instant AIO.

Youtube at 720p, marginal. My brother used one for AT&T streaming , takes a minute or three to buffer. (since upgraded him to a Chuwi LarkBox) Web browsing really needs an ad blocker to be effective. But office products, taxes, simple book keeping, old games (dosbox does okay), SNES emulators all perfectly doable, and at less than 10W.
 
Sep 12, 2022
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10
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You start by having a server that is what is actually hosting your PC, then you use the Dell to remote into it.
Thin clients are not equivalent to PCs. They don't have local storage to hold an OS. They are designed to be used a a terminal to another computer.

That's exactly what I needed to make sure of. Thanks!
 

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