Question How can I tell if Corsair 3000mhz will work with my build?

jamok99

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Nov 30, 2014
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It's been 6 years since I built my first and only computer, so forgive me for not being that tech savvy currently. My question: Is there a simple, near-bulletproof way to find if my near-ancient Corsair LPX 4 x 8gb 3000mhz memory will work with my CPU and motherboard before I have the parts? I know I'll be using an AMD 5600x, 5800x, or 5900x CPU, and the motherboards are between
Gigabyte Aorus Master x570s, Asus VIII Dark Hero x570, and maybe Gigabyte Aorus Extreme x570. I don't really know much about what DOCP or Intel XMP profiles are or how they apply, but when I do look at specs, most motherboards that's fit the 5000 Ryzen series CPUs list about 29xx mhz, and then skip to 3200 mhz. Do I need to give up on using that memory that I already own, or is there some way I can find out for sure beforehand that it'll at least be stable at the 29xx setting? Also, the timing on the Corsair LPX is CL 15. Thanks in advance for your replies!
 

Aeacus

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My question: Is there a simple, near-bulletproof way to find if my near-ancient Corsair LPX 4 x 8gb 3000mhz memory will work with my CPU and motherboard before I have the parts?
No.

Best you can do, is look each MoBo memory QVL list and look if your RAM is listed there (pay close attention to RAM part number).

Also, do note that in later years, RAM manufacturers have released "Ryzen compatible" RAM, which has higher chances of working faster than default JEDEC speeds.
Your RAM still works, but you may not be able to run it at 2933 Mhz. Instead, you might be stuck at 2667/2400/2133 Mhz.
 
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Karadjgne

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3000MHz is one of the oddball ram frequencies. If you look at the buss rating, it's almost always a 133MHz or 266MHz derivitive. 3000MHz is a 200MHz derivitive. 3200 = 266x12. 2133 = 266x8. 2933 = 266x11. Etc. 3000 = 200x15. And some boards don't recognise the jedec tables for xmp set 3000, forcing use of 2933 set manually instead.

Best to look at the board stats, as listed on the vendor website. It'll say what is and what isn't supported, so if it lists 2133, 2400, 2666, 2933(oc), 3200(oc) etc, count on the 3000 not working with xmp, you'd set xmp for voltage and timings, but manually set speed at 2933MHz and maybe fclock will work at 1500, but chances are good you may need to manually set fclock to 1466.

On those boards, guaranteed you'll not see your ram on the QVL, as it won't work as tested right out of the box. You will, however, probably see kits listed at 2933 and/or 3200 as those Corsair's are a pretty popular choice, and use the same OEM for the silicon. So good bet the 3000 will work, with tinkering.

But, as always, ram is subject to silicon lottery, the QVL being nothing more than a list of some of the ram tested as working, using that specific kit at the factory, which is not any kind of guarantee that you using an identical kit will be 100% successful.
 
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Aeacus

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3000MHz is one of the oddball ram frequencies. If you look at the buss rating, it's almost always a 133MHz or 266MHz derivitive.
On AMD side, 3000 Mhz isn't an oddball. It's just that AMD (for some reason), chose to make 2933 Mhz compatible, rather than 3000 Mhz. However, on Intel side, the bus rating is derivative of 100 Mhz or 133 Mhz, making 3000 Mhz common.

Before Ryzen, during Intel rule, common DDR4 RAM speeds are: 2133/ 2400/ 2666/ 2800/ 3000/ 3200/ 3600 and so forth.
With Ryzen, AMD switched some things around, where supported RAM speeds are 2133/ 2400/ 2667/ 2933/ 3200/ 3600 and so forth.

When talking about oddballs, i'd say 2800 Mhz RAM is that. Those are rare on Intel side and non-existent on AMD side.

When comparing latest high-end MoBos, from Intel and AMD side, both offer same amount of different RAM speeds, albeit on different speeds;
* AMD - 1866/ 2133/ 2400/ 2667/ 2800/ 2933/ 3000/ 3066/ 3200/ 3466/ 3600/ 3733/ 3866/ 4000/ 4133/ 4266/ 4400/ 4533/ 4600/ 4733/ 4866/ 5000/ 5100/ 5200/ 5300 Mhz
(MSI MEG X570S ACE MAX)
* Intel - 2133/ 2400/ 2666/ 2933/ 3000/ 3200/ 3300/ 3333/ 3400/ 3466/ 3600/ 3733/ 3866/ 4000/ 4133/ 4200/ 4266/ 4300/ 4400/ 4533/ 4600/ 4800/ 5000/ 5333/ 5600 Mhz
(MSI MEG Z590 GODLIKE)
 
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Karadjgne

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Asus PRIME B560-PLUS ATX LGA1200 Motherboard

Memory Speed
  • DDR4-2133
  • DDR4-2400
  • DDR4-2666
  • DDR4-2800
  • DDR4-2933
  • DDR4-3200
  • DDR4-3333
  • DDR4-3466
  • DDR4-3600
  • DDR4-3733
  • DDR4-4000
  • DDR4-4266
  • DDR4-4400
  • DDR4-4600
Even with the Intels, usage has become 266 buss in some cases, and the cpu will default to that if given the 200/266 choice. 2800 is very rare, even 2933 is rare, as is 3466, because cpus memory controllers aren't running those speeds native. Intel ran 2133, then 2400, then 2666, then 3200 as native MC, as did AMD. Although Ryzens fclock ratio of 1:1 was a hard limit at 3466 and 3733, if you hit 3467 or 3734 at any time, it'd drop to a 1:2 ratio and take the fps with it, so 3200/3600 became the popular choice. With popularity came sales and many ram speeds had lousy enough sales that manufacturing masses of some speeds was a bad gamble as the ram didn't sell.

With Ryzen early issues with ram speeds 3000 did have a little showing, it's chances of stability on Zen or Zen+ were greater than 3200, but that's only if the mobo vendor had the foresight to include a 200 buss as an option. With newer Intel, and prices of ram and mc speeds, only ppl updating from older platforms are using 2133-3000, 3200 kits are mostly cheaper than the slower kits, competition. So no real point adding support for stuff that's not really going to get used. Apart from the socket, there's no real difference between a 9th or 11th gen mobo, so carry over designs made life easy and cheaper.
 
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