How can i upgrade my laptop?

About the RAM, it would be best to upgrade to a similar module with the same frequency... DDR4-2666. Note that by upgrading to let's say an 8GB module or higher you'll be running in flex mode.

That means that if you're using less than 8 GB of RAM you'll be running in dual channel... if you'll be surpassing 8GB of used memory it'll run in single channel (half the bandwidth of dual channel)... so keep that in mind.

For storage, you can upgrade to any M.2 NVMe drive.... there are ones called x2, like yours, that use 2 PCIe lanes and there are x4 ones which use 4 PCIe lanes and are faster. The real world difference is very small between them though. In terms of capacity there's not really a limitation to speak of... you could get SSDs in the realm of TB if you have the budget.
 
Sep 30, 2020
6
0
10
0
About the RAM, it would be best to upgrade to a similar module with the same frequency... DDR4-2666. Note that by upgrading to let's say an 8GB module or higher you'll be running in flex mode.

That means that if you're using less than 8 GB of RAM you'll be running in dual channel... if you'll be surpassing 8GB of used memory it'll run in single channel (half the bandwidth of dual channel)... so keep that in mind.

For storage, you can upgrade to any M.2 NVMe drive.... there are ones called x2, like yours, that use 2 PCIe lanes and there are x4 ones which use 4 PCIe lanes and are faster. The real world difference is very small between them though. In terms of capacity there's not really a limitation to speak of... you could get SSDs in the realm of TB if you have the budget.
Ok. Thanks for the answer. I was worried that i can't put PCIe x4 SSD in the laptop because(at least in my country), all PCIe x2 SSDs are out of stock.
 
Oct 26, 2020
2
0
10
0
Let’s start with the big question. And while we hate to be the bearer of bad news, in most cases, you can’t upgrade your laptop processor. There are some laptops with interchangeable processors, but these machines are expensive and difficult to find.
Most processors are soldered right into the motherboard, presenting a challenge to the typical user, as you’ll need to remove the CPU and swap it out for a new one. If the processor is changeable, then you’ll need to make sure it fits in the same socket and that the motherboard can interact with the new CPU once it’s installed.
If you have an HP desktop computer, the product specification page will be able to tell you which processors are compatible with your existing network. While this doesn’t answer the laptop question, long story short, processing power is more or less locked in…permanently.
 
Let’s start with the big question. And while we hate to be the bearer of bad news, in most cases, you can’t upgrade your laptop processor. There are some laptops with interchangeable processors, but these machines are expensive and difficult to find.
Most processors are soldered right into the motherboard, presenting a challenge to the typical user, as you’ll need to remove the CPU and swap it out for a new one. If the processor is changeable, then you’ll need to make sure it fits in the same socket and that the motherboard can interact with the new CPU once it’s installed.
If you have an HP desktop computer, the product specification page will be able to tell you which processors are compatible with your existing network. While this doesn’t answer the laptop question, long story short, processing power is more or less locked in…permanently.
Out of context answer... he didn't ask for that. The I5-1035G4 is made for thin and light laptops and is definitely soldered.... FCBGA1526 = Ball Grid Array = soldered to the board, plain and simple. I hope that seals the deal on the CPU upgradeability for you.

Can't understand why people feel the need to revive threads out of the blue with no reason.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY