[SOLVED] How come Windows didn't get deactivated after changing mobo and CPU?

Myronazz

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Hello... so... today I finished installing my Ryzen 5 system (converted from an Intel system) and I was 100% certain that after installing everything Windows would deactivate and complain about the license

But after I booted into the Windows 10 drive, it took about 5 minutes to install 'new devices' aka the new motherboard and booted afterwards just fine no issues, then I went to the System Information window and it was still activated...? How come? Does it take time for Windows to process this somehow?

I actually got a used motherboard so maybe there was already a licence tied to it? But then even so, it should of have deactivated anyway because of the brand new CPU... so why?!?! Not that I complain, i'm just really curious. It seems strange to me
 

USAFRet

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The CPU doesn't matter.
Yes, the used motherboard may have already had a license linked to it.
It may become deactivated, whenever the activation servers catch up. It's not always instant and automatic.

Or, it may stay activated forever...:)
 
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USAFRet

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The CPU doesn't matter.
Yes, the used motherboard may have already had a license linked to it.
It may become deactivated, whenever the activation servers catch up. It's not always instant and automatic.

Or, it may stay activated forever...:)
 
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hotaru251

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its random.

"technically" changing MB warrants them to de-activate it.

however many people have done so and neverh ad it deactivated and those who have have been able to contact MS and get them to transfer the key to new one.


not a 100% guarantee your mileage may vary.
 

Myronazz

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The CPU doesn't matter.
Does it not? I have heard countless times that it does.. but oh well saves me the trouble I suppose, it's been around two hours since the Ryzen system powered on for the first time, Windows is still activated so I guess the previous owner had a key tied to it? I don't know and I don't care, so long as the annoying watermark doesn't pop up XD

Thanks everyone for the help!!!!
 

Myronazz

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It is applicable.
A Retail license can be used on new and different hardware, but the activation is not necessarily automatic.
Hence, the Activation Troubleshooter.
My old CPU & MoBo were part of a pre-built I got from PCSpecialist (Though a real specialist wouldn't use a VS350 on a high performance system, but that's a different topic) so it's most likely an OEM key I have, looking at the product ID now it still says 'OEM' at the end of it so really not sure if this is the same key or a different one, should of have noted it down before swapping hardware, oh well... doesn't matter so long as it stays activated
 

Myronazz

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Well we'll just have to wait and see... so far so good. I guess in the bad scenario it gets deactivated at some later point, I can't transfer my licence from my other MoBo because it's an OEM if I am not mistaken...

I heard Microsoft still secretly offers Windows 10, apparently you can put a Windows 7 or 8 key in the installation process and it will accept it just fine, I read this in an article earlier this month but have no idea if it's true. I do happen to have a retail Windows 7 key but it has been useless to me since I don't really use Windows 7 anymore but this may be a good opportunity to make good use of it before Windows 7 goes poof next year, but is this even true? Has anyone actually tried this method?
 
It is applicable.
A Retail license can be used on new and different hardware, but the activation is not necessarily automatic.
Hence, the Activation Troubleshooter.
@USAFRet If it's a retail copy of windows and you plug the pre-installed drive into another motherboard it technically wouldn't have to reactivate again. It was already activated.
@Myronazz You probably should do a clean install of windows so your system performs optimally with your new hardware. Just make sure you have the license info (CD Key) because you will 100% have to activate again from a fresh install.
 

USAFRet

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@USAFRet If it's a retail copy of windows and you plug the pre-installed drive into another motherboard it technically wouldn't have to reactivate again. It was already activated.
No, seeing a new motherboard it will be (might be) deactivated.
You then apply the license key, it checks with home base, and all is well.

It does not automagically activate with new hardware.
 

Myronazz

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Ohhh so that method really works? Gee seems like Microsoft REALLY wants people on Windows 10. I will only do this if my key gets deactivated though, I have no desire to reinstall Windows and loose all of my configurations and programs, it's a pain to get back on track so i'll do it if only necessary.

Besides Windows 10 seems pretty darn good at adjusting to new hardware, back in the day it would crash all the time and croak at the sight of new hardware and older drivers but now it seems that it finds drivers super easy and cleans itself pretty well on that area to reduce conflicts, so not really worried over any performance compromise

Thanks for the help once again! I really appreciate it.
 

USAFRet

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Ohhh so that method really works? Gee seems like Microsoft REALLY wants people on Windows 10. I will only do this if my key gets deactivated though, I have no desire to reinstall Windows and loose all of my configurations and programs, it's a pain to get back on track so i'll do it if only necessary.

Besides Windows 10 seems pretty darn good at adjusting to new hardware, back in the day it would crash all the time and croak at the sight of new hardware and older drivers but now it seems that it finds drivers super easy and cleans itself pretty well on that area to reduce conflicts, so not really worried over any performance compromise

Thanks for the help once again! I really appreciate it.
Activation status is altogether different from operating status.

With all new hardware, your old install might boot up, it might fail.
Win 10 is better than previous versions, but by no means a 100% guarantee.
Prepare for it it fails.
 
Also if you use an online MS login your key gets tied to your MS account and that makes it a lot easier to transfer. Having the same PC name and MS account might be enough for it to simply stay activated, if not the troubleshooter lets you pick from a list of activated machines on your account and nominate that as the machine you are on. You can't use a key on two different machines at once and the rules are a bit tougher on OEM licences in theory, but this method seems to work more often than not regardless of OEM/Retail.

They have definitely loosened up the activation rules since windows 7 days, but then back in windows XP days you could re use old keys on any hardware as long as it was not in use and hadn't been activated in more than 3 months :)
 

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