Question How do I change the boot disk and partition ?

Sep 26, 2022
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I cloned C partition from Disk 0 on to Disk 1 . How do I change the boot manager to recognize this?
 
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I cloned C partition from Dick 0 on to Disk 1 . How do I change to boot manager to recognize this?
If you only cloned the partition, the new drive needs a bootloader. While it's marked for Windows 7, this should work regardless: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-7/ee829683(v=ws.10)?redirectedfrom=MSDN

Otherwise you should find a way to clone the entire drive. If you're transferring to an SSD, the SSD manufacturer may have a so-called data migration tool that makes this process easy.
 
So you want to boot from windows on partition H: (Clone of C).
Is that correct?

First boot from cloned drive has to be done with old drive (clone source) physically disconnected. This is important.
If you fail do do this, drive letters in cloned windows get messed up and you have to redo cloning.

You have a bootloader partition on Disk 1 (BTW - it doesn't need to be 1.87GB. 350MB - 500MB is enough).
add boot entry to bootloader on Disk 1.
(execute from elevated command prompt)
diskpart
list disk
select disk 1
(select 1863GB disk)​
list partition
select partition 3
(select 1.87 GB EFI System partition)​
assign letter=M
exit
bcdboot H:\windows /s M:
Last message should be "Boot files created successfully".

Next, shut down pc,
physically disconnect 89GB disk,
boot into BIOS and set boot priority - 1st boot device to Windows boot Manager on 2TB disk.
After that you should be able to boot into windows.

https://www.computerhope.com/jargon/e/elevated.htm
 
Last edited:
Sep 26, 2022
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Disk 1 C CLONE IS 125gb. almost 2x the size of the orig.

Found this:
Acer Aspire TC-710 Flagship Premium High Performance Gaming Desktop (2018 New), Intel Quad-Core i7-6700 3.4 GHz, 16GB RAM, 2TB HDD + 96 GB SSD
 
Last edited:

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Disk 1 C CLONE IS 125gb. almost 2x the size of the orig.

Found this:
Acer Aspire TC-710 Flagship Premium High Performance Gaming Desktop (2018 New), Intel Quad-Core i7-6700 3.4 GHz, 16GB RAM, 2TB HDD + 96 GB SSD
And in 2022, 125GB for the C partition is TooSmall.
You were running out of space at 89GB. How long before your 125GB is also not enough?


Personally, I would redo it. Properly, and not have the current issue of booting from the wrong drive.
And fix the size issue at the same time.
But thats just me.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
159,256
12,639
176,090
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It will not letme take space from Disk1 to make the C drive larger than 89GB (using EaseUs).
Assuming the system still boots from the original drive, redo the clone operation.
This time, you can change the size of the C partition on the target drive.

Pay attention to the middle section:

-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Both drives must be the same partitioning scheme, either MBR or GPT
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung target SSD)
If you are cloning from a SATA drive to PCIe/NVMe, you may need to install the relevant driver for this new NVMe/PCIe drive.
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up

Verify the system boots with ONLY the current "C drive" connected.
If not, we have to fix that first.

Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive

[Ignore this section if using the SDM. It does this automatically]
If you are going from a smaller drive to a larger, by default, the target partition size will be the same as the Source. You probably don't want that
You can manipulate the size of the partitions on the target (larger)drive.
Click on "Cloned Partition Properties", and you can specify the resulting partition size, to even include the whole thing.
[/end ignore]

Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD. This is not optional.
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD

(swapping cables is irrelevant with NVMe drives, but DO disconnect the old drive for this next part)
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

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