Question How do I change the User name that appears in Command Prompt?

Nov 23, 2020
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When using CMD, the file path just says user, even though my user account has my name. How do I change it to my user name?
 

Ralston18

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Math Geek

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only having the built in admin account is the problem. windows will never let you use that account for the cmd prompt. since there is no other user to default to it simply downgrades your access level and gives it a generic "user" name

if you create a user and use that then this will go away. IT IS NEVER A GOOD IDEA TO USE THE BUILT IN ADMIN ACCOUNT FOR REGULAR DAILY USE!!!
 
Reactions: King_V
Nov 23, 2020
7
0
10
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Nov 23, 2020
7
0
10
0
only having the built in admin account is the problem. windows will never let you use that account for the cmd prompt. since there is no other user to default to it simply downgrades your access level and gives it a generic "user" name

if you create a user and use that then this will go away. IT IS NEVER A GOOD IDEA TO USE THE BUILT IN ADMIN ACCOUNT FOR REGULAR DAILY USE!!!
I think that could be the problem. Thanks. just curious but what is the problem with using the built in account.
 

Math Geek

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it gets greatest access to the system than a regular user, even one that is also an "administrator". therefore any normal day to day stuff you do on the pc has a lot more access to the system. any bit of nastiness you happen to come into contact with, can do a lot more damage from that account than any other account.

think about the fact that every hacker has an ultimate goal of getting "root" access to a system. that's where they can really do damage and control things. the built in admin account is basically the same thing as "root" access. starting off there only makes it a lot faster and easier to take control and have fun with an infected system. using a normal user account restricts most access to the system itself so an infection has to do a lot more work to really cause a bunch of trouble.

it's a basic security protection to prevent unauthorized access to the system.
 
Reactions: Ralston18
Nov 23, 2020
7
0
10
0
it gets greatest access to the system than a regular user, even one that is also an "administrator". therefore any normal day to day stuff you do on the pc has a lot more access to the system. any bit of nastiness you happen to come into contact with, can do a lot more damage from that account than any other account.

think about the fact that every hacker has an ultimate goal of getting "root" access to a system. that's where they can really do damage and control things. the built in admin account is basically the same thing as "root" access. starting off there only makes it a lot faster and easier to take control and have fun with an infected system. using a normal user account restricts most access to the system itself so an infection has to do a lot more work to really cause a bunch of trouble.

it's a basic security protection to prevent unauthorized access to the system.
That's very good to know. Thanks very much for they reply.
 
I think that OP refers to the current working drectory "C:\Users\MyUserName" as "User Name", while in path this is the current path. You "change" it with "CD <folder name>" and "<drive letter>:" commands. If you want always to start at C:\MyStuff, create a shortcut to CMD.EXE, with that folder as "working folder"
 

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