[SOLVED] How do I check if I get a worse product on black friday?

Nov 7, 2019
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I need a new GPU and planned on buying the 2070 Super, but I'm afraid of acquiring a worse model that's already in retail shops in preperation for black friday. Is there any way to check if I get a worse model? And do some of you know how long they stay in retail after/before black friday?

Edit: On black friday a lot of products get sold for less money than before. To achieve this low price, most of products are specially produced in a worse quality than they should be for the original price. My question is, if there is any way to check if I get a worse product before buying it. Maybe some of you experienced this before.
 
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Nov 6, 2019
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This is super relatable. You won't have to worry about that with GPUs though.

A store might stock an item such as a food processor exclusively for Black Friday. While the quality of this item may be suspect it is still a separate item from the normal food processors that the store had in stock (assuming that they normally stock that kind of item anyway).

What you should focus on instead is the price of your parts right now and exactly what they come with. Having sales that aren't actually as steep as they look is a popular legal deceptive practice (with various caveats or tells depending on local regulations). A business might also be able to maximize their profit by selling the item solo instead of with accessories. The opposite could be done to entice buyers with a better value as part of a bundle with a higher price. The business might offer incentives during slower sales periods that won't be offered year-round.

I think it's a more realistic situation to be worried about bootlegs from shady sellers trying to cash in on holiday sales. For this reason make sure to research who you buy things from if you shop with Amazon or Ebay.

What country do you live in? I feel confident in how my advice applies to the USA but I wouldn't know much about how stores work in other countries.


Nope. 100% legit. Look at Best Buy for example. During Black Friday sales they will have televisions that have a unique SKU. An easy way to find out for yourself is visit stores or check sales catalogs. Then find the SKU on a doorbuster television. Odds are it's an old model or a product made just for Black Friday.

About halfway down in this article: https://www.businessinsider.com/black-friday-insider-secrets-2017-11#theyll-even-sometimes-increase-the-normal-price-of-an-item-before-the-holidays-to-make-the-discount-seem-deeper-7

Or this: https://www.forbes.com/sites/benzingainsights/2012/11/21/why-you-shouldnt-buy-a-tv-on-black-friday/
Thanks for the verification. However this kind of thing isn't feasible for every product so for that reason I don't think it happens with GPUs. GPUs are way too specialized, require technically adept drivers, and work in tandem with multiple other parts. TVs almost don't compute anything unless they have built-in smart TV functions or HDR.
 

drivinfast247

Respectable
why would tv manufacturers even make one off models? not cost effective. this is bunk. provide credible evidence and please stop spreading FUD
Nope. 100% legit. Look at Best Buy for example. During Black Friday sales they will have televisions that have a unique SKU. An easy way to find out for yourself is visit stores or check sales catalogs. Then find the SKU on a doorbuster television. Odds are it's an old model or a product made just for Black Friday.

About halfway down in this article: https://www.businessinsider.com/black-friday-insider-secrets-2017-11#theyll-even-sometimes-increase-the-normal-price-of-an-item-before-the-holidays-to-make-the-discount-seem-deeper-7

Or this: https://www.forbes.com/sites/benzingainsights/2012/11/21/why-you-shouldnt-buy-a-tv-on-black-friday/

Quote from this older article:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/11/27/dont-buy-a-tv-on-black-friday/3768903/
"In their quest to attract shoppers, stores will partner with big-name manufacturers to create "derivative models" — stripped-down versions of pre-existing TVs. These TVs, made specifically for Black Friday, are often not as good as the model they're based on: The picture may be lesser quality, or the warranty may be altered. There could be some missing features or components."

You learn something new everyday.
 
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Reactions: VindictivVe

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
Yeah, Black Friday derivative models is a real thing, but I think the original poster is a bit confused; it's not that the same model is made worse or with worse parts, it'll be something cheaper under another SKU.

These are always kinda rare and they're mostly for the shopping season, not for the one-day doorbuster, a model which the retail industry has largely moved away from. A bit like the GTX 460 SE released about a decade ago as a cheap second model number with the need for something cheaper and the GTX 460 786 MBs all gone. But you're not going to buy a "GTX 1070 Super" and have it be anything else.
 
Reactions: VindictivVe
Nov 6, 2019
22
4
25
1
This is super relatable. You won't have to worry about that with GPUs though.

A store might stock an item such as a food processor exclusively for Black Friday. While the quality of this item may be suspect it is still a separate item from the normal food processors that the store had in stock (assuming that they normally stock that kind of item anyway).

What you should focus on instead is the price of your parts right now and exactly what they come with. Having sales that aren't actually as steep as they look is a popular legal deceptive practice (with various caveats or tells depending on local regulations). A business might also be able to maximize their profit by selling the item solo instead of with accessories. The opposite could be done to entice buyers with a better value as part of a bundle with a higher price. The business might offer incentives during slower sales periods that won't be offered year-round.

I think it's a more realistic situation to be worried about bootlegs from shady sellers trying to cash in on holiday sales. For this reason make sure to research who you buy things from if you shop with Amazon or Ebay.

What country do you live in? I feel confident in how my advice applies to the USA but I wouldn't know much about how stores work in other countries.


Nope. 100% legit. Look at Best Buy for example. During Black Friday sales they will have televisions that have a unique SKU. An easy way to find out for yourself is visit stores or check sales catalogs. Then find the SKU on a doorbuster television. Odds are it's an old model or a product made just for Black Friday.

About halfway down in this article: https://www.businessinsider.com/black-friday-insider-secrets-2017-11#theyll-even-sometimes-increase-the-normal-price-of-an-item-before-the-holidays-to-make-the-discount-seem-deeper-7

Or this: https://www.forbes.com/sites/benzingainsights/2012/11/21/why-you-shouldnt-buy-a-tv-on-black-friday/
Thanks for the verification. However this kind of thing isn't feasible for every product so for that reason I don't think it happens with GPUs. GPUs are way too specialized, require technically adept drivers, and work in tandem with multiple other parts. TVs almost don't compute anything unless they have built-in smart TV functions or HDR.
 
lol, those were largely click-bait articles with little to no proof, just some goon quoted as saying something. and it's probably the crappy tv and electronics makers that do that sort of fraudulent thing.

Anyway, it's better to order from Amazon and get exactly what model you want than to go into a store and pick it up--then you won't have to worry about scams. I don't waste my time on Black Friday shopping. My time is precious. The last time I went shopping on Black Friday somebody ran into my car in a parking lot. bah
 
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drivinfast247

Respectable
lol, those were largely click-bait articles with little to no proof, just some goon quoted as saying something. and it's probably the crappy tv and electronics makers that do that sort of fraudulent thing.
Yeah, Sony, Samsung, Vizio, TCL, you know, those unheard of brands. You don't like being proven wrong, do you.

If I said I know multiple people in retail that have said and proven the same thing would that help? Lol

And as I stated originally, I highly doubt a GPU manufacturer would go through the hassle for a niche market product.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: VindictivVe
Nov 6, 2019
22
4
25
1
lol, those were largely click-bait articles with little to no proof, just some goon quoted as saying something. and it's probably the crappy tv and electronics makers that do that sort of fraudulent thing.

Anyway, it's better to order from Amazon and get exactly what model you want than to go into a store and pick it up--then you won't have to worry about scams. I don't waste my time on Black Friday shopping. My time is precious. The last time I went shopping on Black Friday somebody ran into my car in a parking lot. bah
Anyway, it's better to go to Best Buy and get exactly what model you want than to go online and order it--then you won't have to worry about scams. I don't waste my time on Black Friday shopping.
Sorry but that cracked me up. My deepest sympathies for the collision though. I can imagine that far too well.

Whether online or in-person we all need to be "smart shoppers" and dodge shady practices. Being aware of what's out there is part of that.
 
Reactions: VindictivVe
agreed. know the model you want, look at reviews and price histories and if a deal seems too good to be true, it probably is

if you can't find price history you know it's one of those funny models, so, don't buy it. I am not a cheapo person so it doesn't matter, I look for all the features I need or want and then look for a fair price from a reputable manufacturer after doing reviews and research.
 
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