Question How do I clone a failing SSD to a new one?

Nit Pick

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So after some long self diagnosing, it turns out my SSD is failing. I used Hard Drive Sentinel to tell me. But this is different from the other posts.

Because somehow when I tried to install Windows 10 on the first SSD, it somehow installed a portion of it on a different hard drive.

It worked fine for a while but as of late, it started dying. When I somewhat clone the the old SSD to the new one using Samsung's Data Migration App; about 99%, my computer crashes right when it's certifying the partition.

I added some computer specs to my signature if it helps anything.
 

Nit Pick

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A failing drive? You don't.

What drive did you install the OS on, and what portion (boot partition?) ended up on what drive?
Which one is 'failing'?
Well that's just it, I intended for it to be installed on the C drive. But it most of it ended up on (let's just say) the F drive. I'm able to turn on my computer but it freezes because of the dying SSD.

Oh and it's the C Drive that's failing.
 
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USAFRet

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Well that's just it, I intended for it to be installed on the C drive. But it most of it ended up on (let's just say) the F drive. I'm able to turn on my computer but it freezes because of the dying SSD.

Oh and it's the C Drive that's failing.
Right.
That usually happens when you have more than one drive connected during the install process.
The boot partition ends up on 'the other drive'.

To your problem though...if the SSD is actually failing, cloning it is a wasted effort.

Cloning between drives is not a magical fix. Everything needs to be perfect before you start.
Here, it is not.

Bite the bullet and just do a clean OS install on the new drive.
With only the new drive connected this time.
 

Nit Pick

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Right.
That usually happens when you have more than one drive connected during the install process.
The boot partition ends up on 'the other drive'.

To your problem though...if the SSD is actually failing, cloning it is a wasted effort.

Cloning between drives is not a magical fix. Everything needs to be perfect before you start.
Here, it is not.

Bite the bullet and just do a clean OS install on the new drive.
With only the new drive connected this time.
I'll accept doing that (even if it means keeping this Sysiphus levels of problems going on a little bit longer), but let me get this straight. There's no way to get the boot partition to the C drive? They couldn't just... not let that happen? Why does that happen?
 

USAFRet

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That sometimes(usually?) happens when you have more than one drive connected during the install.
That's why many, many many tutorials strongly recommend only having the one drive connected.

For most people it isn't an issue, because they have only the one drive.
For all others...this:



For your current issue...you need to put in a new drive and do a full OS install.
Can't clone a failing drive.
 

Nit Pick

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Mar 27, 2015
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That sometimes(usually?) happens when you have more than one drive connected during the install.
That's why many, many many tutorials strongly recommend only having the one drive connected.

For most people it isn't an issue, because they have only the one drive.
For all others...this:



For your current issue...you need to put in a new drive and do a full OS install.
Can't clone a failing drive.
Okay, thank you for your time.
 

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