Question HOW DO I CONNECT A TWO PIN-TWO WIRE INTERNAL SPEAKER TO MY MOBO?

Is my MOBO ancient?

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Feb 11, 2020
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I have an ASRock G31M-S (SEE ALL SPECIFICATIONS HERE), and I just found an internal two_pin (1.5W) speaker lying around the house. I tried to connect it to my MOBO but the only connecter pins I found related to audio outputs are, a 4 pin(marked as SPEAKER1), and a 9 pin(marked as HD_AUDIO1).
You will find all related images HERE.
The speaker is same as THIS ONE being sold online.
I'm not very experienced with these things, please help.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The four pin Chassis speaker header is for the 2 pin system chassis speaker, which is used ONLY for beep error and stop codes. The two center pins are dummy pins, with no actual connections. Only the two outer pins on that header actually do anything so as long as the two pins on your speaker line up with those two pins it will probably work although that speaker looks nothing like any system chassis speaker for a PC that I've ever seen or used over the last 30 years or so, but might have been used on some OEM systems. They typically look like this.

 
Feb 11, 2020
2
0
10
0
The four pin Chassis speaker header is for the 2 pin system chassis speaker, which is used ONLY for beep error and stop codes. The two center pins are dummy pins, with no actual connections. Only the two outer pins on that header actually do anything so as long as the two pins on your speaker line up with those two pins it will probably work although that speaker looks nothing like any system chassis speaker for a PC that I've ever seen or used over the last 30 years or so, but might have been used on some OEM systems. They typically look like this.

Thanks for the reply,
But the speaker you're referring to is one which is used for troubleshooting-beeps and stuff, whereas the one I have plays all audio.
It was actually plugged in an old PC, which I don't use anymore.
Maybe It isn't compatible with my MOBO .
 

boju

Champion
Ambassador
Front panel header on the mobo is for case audio jacks if your case had these. You don't connect speakers directly to these pins.

Why not just get normal pc speakers and plug them to the motherboard audio jacks?

The reason we suggested the beep code speaker is because of the nature of your question.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Thanks for the reply,
But the speaker you're referring to is one which is used for troubleshooting-beeps and stuff, whereas the one I have plays all audio.
It was actually plugged in an old PC, which I don't use anymore.
Maybe It isn't compatible with my MOBO .
No, that speaker is NOT used to play all audio. That speaker IS the same as the speaker I showed you. It IS the beep and stop code speaker. There are NO speakers, ever, that connect directly to the motherboard for playing sound. Speakers always connect either to a front panel or rear I/O audio jack. Speakers that connect directly to the motherboard are always for error codes (beeps).

Even since as far back as the Apple II GS and Commodore 64, personal computers have come with jacks for connecting external speakers and if you want sound, that is what you do. The speaker you have there, is not that kind of speaker. It was not intended for that kind of usage, not even in the system it originally came in.
 

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