Question How do I get 9 fans in one case/on one motherboard

Nov 18, 2021
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Hello,
I have the AUSS ROG STRIX Z 490-F and is planning to upgrade my cooling a little, but I am wondering how (I am really new to this and there is probably a really simple solution how) how do I get 9 NF-P12s in a single case when the motherboard has only 2 headers?
and also if there is anyone that knows any better (not too expensive) fans to put in
 

boju

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Fan controller/hub can accommodate more fans off the one header. Some cases come already equipped with controller like the Lian Li Lancool II Mesh Performance/RGB supporting up to 6 individual fans and rpm is controlled by front panel switch.

Then there's case fans like these that interconnect with each other resulting in a single cable to power multiple. I use a couple of these for top exhaust.


Can also use pump headers for fans.

Have a look at fan controllers/hubs.
 

Eximo

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You need a fan hub. Probably an 8 or 10 fan one. Phanteks, Deepcool, NZXT, etc all make them.

Plenty of fans out there that can do the job that are cheaper. A popular alternative is the Arctic P12.

I like Phanteks F140MP, mostly for the white blades, but they are 140mm.

I don't think you can go wrong with even some of the cheaper fans from NZXT, Phanteks, CoolerMaster, Fractal Design. When run at lower RPMs they get the job done.
 
Nov 18, 2021
14
0
10
0
You need a fan hub. Probably an 8 or 10 fan one. Phanteks, Deepcool, NZXT, etc all make them.

Plenty of fans out there that can do the job that are cheaper. A popular alternative is the Arctic P12.

I like Phanteks F140MP, mostly for the white blades, but they are 140mm.

I don't think you can go wrong with even some of the cheaper fans from NZXT, Phanteks, CoolerMaster, Fractal Design. When run at lower RPMs they get the job done.
I have heard about the Artic P12 and Scythe Kaze Flex 120 and then those NF-P12 before(and I will probably go for any of them, I know noctua from before so if they are not really overpriced or such I will probably go for them, dont really care about looks/RGB), is there actually any difference between them or is it mostly just prefrence?
and thanks, I will take a look at those fan hubs
 

Eximo

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Well, Noctua has been branching out, making black fans even. But I think those fans in particular are over-priced for the job.

Most fans these days are a hybrid airflow/static pressure design. You can still find bespoke airflow and static pressure fans, but they seem to be dying off.
 
Nov 18, 2021
14
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10
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Well, Noctua has been branching out, making black fans even. But I think those fans in particular are over-priced for the job.

Most fans these days are a hybrid airflow/static pressure design. You can still find bespoke airflow and static pressure fans, but they seem to be dying off.
and then. what is PWM and should I get fans that have it or not?
 

Eximo

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There are two types of fan speed control. Voltage and Pulse Width Modulation. 4-pin fans are generally PWM, but motherboard headers can still operate the 3-pin fans.

PWM motherboards will be able to software control the fans based on temperature input. Fully configurable. Voltage fans are usually just on at their full speed at 12V, so you buy the RPM you want, or use resistive adapters or fan controllers. PWM fans will also run off 3-pin headers, they will just run at full speed (but also means that resistive outputs also work on them)

Most hubs will take the PWM input from the motherboard and apply that to all the connected fans. So if you set it climb with GPU temperature (ie gaming) then you can have the case fans ramp up and be at idle speeds when not. CPU fan can be tied to the CPU temperature so that when you are doing CPU intensive tasks but not gaming, your system can be relatively quiet.
 
Nov 18, 2021
14
0
10
0
There are two types of fan speed control. Voltage and Pulse Width Modulation. 4-pin fans are generally PWM, but motherboard headers can still operate the 3-pin fans.

PWM motherboards will be able to software control the fans based on temperature input. Fully configurable. Voltage fans are usually just on at their full speed at 12V, so you buy the RPM you want, or use resistive adapters or fan controllers. PWM fans will also run off 3-pin headers, they will just run at full speed (but also means that resistive outputs also work on them)

Most hubs will take the PWM input from the motherboard and apply that to all the connected fans. So if you set it climb with GPU temperature (ie gaming) then you can have the case fans ramp up and be at idle speeds when not. CPU fan can be tied to the CPU temperature so that when you are doing CPU intensive tasks but not gaming, your system can be relatively quiet.
Alright, big thanks!
 
Nov 18, 2021
14
0
10
0
You need a fan hub. Probably an 8 or 10 fan one. Phanteks, Deepcool, NZXT, etc all make them.

Plenty of fans out there that can do the job that are cheaper. A popular alternative is the Arctic P12.

I like Phanteks F140MP, mostly for the white blades, but they are 140mm.

I don't think you can go wrong with even some of the cheaper fans from NZXT, Phanteks, CoolerMaster, Fractal Design. When run at lower RPMs they get the job done.
I found one fan hub with 10 ports from ARTICS for only 6.9€ is it something worth having or should I look for something else, like the deepcool one?
 

Eximo

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Ah, that one just supplies power. The fans will run at full speed. Fan controllers would have a cable to plug into the motherboard for control and RPM feedback.

Performance wise, hard to say. 1700RPM is certainly well into the audible range for most fans. Depends on if you want to prioritize noise or performance.
 

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