[SOLVED] How do I identify my specific type of GPU?

Nov 27, 2019
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hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Why did you need to know the card you have in order to clean the computer? You would have seen the card model when you open the case and look at the actual card. Or do you mean something else when you say "it's time to clean it"?
 
Nov 27, 2019
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Why did you need to know the card you have in order to clean the computer? You would have seen the card model when you open the case and look at the actual card. Or do you mean something else when you say "it's time to clean it"?
Hi, by cleaning I mean I want to clean the GPU as well as the rest of the unit but the GPU out of all the components concerns me the most as I'm a novice and have never cleaned a PC before. It looks like SolidJake has answered the question with certainty but I'll respond to you anyway, I really appreciate the responses it means a great deal to me.

I was trying my absolute best to avoid opening the PC up to manually identify the specific GPU model number as I wouldn't know what to look for or where to look. I keep thinking I'm going to damage something or I might be too rough with it since I've never actually cleaned a PC before and I naturally get sweaty hands(which is why I'll wear gloves and maybe buy an anti-static wrist strap when working inside the unit). I thought there would be a way of using software to identify it.

I'd like to clean the fan shroud as all 3 fans are visibly dirty but in order to access that I need to separate the PCB from the Heatsink and since I'm doing that I've read online that if you are taking a GPU apart you NEED to replace the Thermal Paste and since I'm already going to be replacing the paste I will get a glimpse of the state of the thermal pads in which I'm dreading replacing because of all the uncertainty surrounding the thickness of the pads on the VRMs and Memory Chips online (I've read some posts of people replacing them 100mm x 100mm with 0.5mm thickness and reporting a temperature increases).

This is why I wanted to find out the exact GPU model so I can find the documentation and perhaps find more information on the disassembly/schematics so I can get the thermal pad change correct(If I have to replace them).

If I take apart the GPU and the thermal pads seem to be in tact is it okay to leave them as is or do I absolutely have to change them as I've opened the GPU?

And if you've made it this far I'm just going to throw this out there in case anyone knows the answer or any advice. What size and thickness should the thermal pads be on the VRMs and Memory Chips of the Gigabyte GTX 970 G1? (Apparently the thickness of the thermal pads for the VRM and Memory chips should be different to each other). I was thinking of contacting Gigabyte directly if I cannot find an accurate answer online.


Thank you very much for your responses and patience.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Hi, by cleaning I mean I want to clean the GPU as well as the rest of the unit but the GPU out of all the components concerns me the most as I'm a novice and have never cleaned a PC before. It looks like SolidJake has answered the question with certainty but I'll respond to you anyway, I really appreciate the responses it means a great deal to me.

I was trying my absolute best to avoid opening the PC up to manually identify the specific GPU model number as I wouldn't know what to look for or where to look. I keep thinking I'm going to damage something or I might be too rough with it since I've never actually cleaned a PC before and I naturally get sweaty hands(which is why I'll wear gloves and maybe buy an anti-static wrist strap when working inside the unit). I thought there would be a way of using software to identify it.

I'd like to clean the fan shroud as all 3 fans are visibly dirty but in order to access that I need to separate the PCB from the Heatsink and since I'm doing that I've read online that if you are taking a GPU apart you NEED to replace the Thermal Paste and since I'm already going to be replacing the paste I will get a glimpse of the state of the thermal pads in which I'm dreading replacing because of all the uncertainty surrounding the thickness of the pads on the VRMs and Memory Chips online (I've read some posts of people replacing them 100mm x 100mm with 0.5mm thickness and reporting a temperature increases).

This is why I wanted to find out the exact GPU model so I can find the documentation and perhaps find more information on the disassembly/schematics so I can get the thermal pad change correct(If I have to replace them).

If I take apart the GPU and the thermal pads seem to be in tact is it okay to leave them as is or do I absolutely have to change them as I've opened the GPU?

And if you've made it this far I'm just going to throw this out there in case anyone knows the answer or any advice. What size and thickness should the thermal pads be on the VRMs and Memory Chips of the Gigabyte GTX 970 G1? (Apparently the thickness of the thermal pads for the VRM and Memory chips should be different to each other). I was thinking of contacting Gigabyte directly if I cannot find an accurate answer online.


Thank you very much for your responses and patience.
The thing with your question that I found odd, to open the system and clean it you don't need to know in advance what's inside since when you open it you will see it, and to clean it you need to open it anyway so just open it. You don't need to take the GPU apart to clean out dust from the computer. Only time you need to remove the heatsink to swap the thermal past is if the video card is getting too hot. To clean the computer, just open the case, blow out the dust, maybe use a brush to wipe things down that are really caked with dusk. Even the GPU fans and shroud you can clean without taking it apart too much but you would want to remove it from the case to blow it out. Don't take anything apart more than you need to unless there is an actual issue.
 
Nov 27, 2019
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The thing with your question that I found odd, to open the system and clean it you don't need to know in advance what's inside since when you open it you will see it, and to clean it you need to open it anyway so just open it. You don't need to take the GPU apart to clean out dust from the computer. Only time you need to remove the heatsink to swap the thermal past is if the video card is getting too hot. To clean the computer, just open the case, blow out the dust, maybe use a brush to wipe things down that are really caked with dusk. Even the GPU fans and shroud you can clean without taking it apart too much but you would want to remove it from the case to blow it out. Don't take anything apart more than you need to unless there is an actual issue.
Hi,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my long-winded comment.

I mainly wanted to clean the fans but after realizing to gain full access to the fans requires near full disassembly to which the thermal pads/paste are exposed, so I thought I should be prepared if they need replacing. After reading your comment I realize now that unless there's an issue(overheating) with the GPU it doesn't need to be disassembled at all and the fans in this case can be cleaned from the exterior.

I'm thankful you mentioned this as there's actually no known issues with the computer (no blue screens, no random restarts). You're quite right, I had to open it up and look inside anyway at some point but I avoided it out of fear which was very cowardice of me.

I was being over-scrupulous and pedantic with carrying out the clean as being a novice I didn't want to miss something or encounter an issue I could've planned ahead for, I didn't realize it was simpler than I made it out to be.

So I now know that if any component isn't malfunctioning or having an issue of sorts it doesn't need to be dismantled.

Do I need to hold the GPU fans still when I spray them with compressed air can I let them spin? I have Q tips and Iso-Propyl Alcohol if it would be better to use that? (The fan blades are quite visibly dirty and could do with a clean).


Thanks
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Hi,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my long-winded comment.

I mainly wanted to clean the fans but after realizing to gain full access to the fans requires near full disassembly to which the thermal pads/paste are exposed, so I thought I should be prepared if they need replacing. After reading your comment I realize now that unless there's an issue(overheating) with the GPU it doesn't need to be disassembled at all and the fans in this case can be cleaned from the exterior.

I'm thankful you mentioned this as there's actually no known issues with the computer (no blue screens, no random restarts). You're quite right, I had to open it up and look inside anyway at some point but I avoided it out of fear which was very cowardice of me.

I was being over-scrupulous and pedantic with carrying out the clean as being a novice I didn't want to miss something or encounter an issue I could've planned ahead for, I didn't realize it was simpler than I made it out to be.

So I now know that if any component isn't malfunctioning or having an issue of sorts it doesn't need to be dismantled.

Do I need to hold the GPU fans still when I spray them with compressed air can I let them spin? I have Q tips and Iso-Propyl Alcohol if it would be better to use that? (The fan blades are quite visibly dirty and could do with a clean).


Thanks
Yes you should not let the fans spin freely, it should not damage anything but there is a chance.

My air cleaning kit is actually a bit funny, I don't buy compressed air, I use a small toy foam water gun that will shoot out decently strong air when pumped. Cheaper and 100% re-usable. Plus you can soak your friends with it :)


Also get a brush to break up the dust/dirt a bit. I just use a cheap artist brush and tape the bristles to the handle more to make sure they don't fall off in the case.

qtips and alcohol are good to use, or use a narrow foam brush for better coverage. Just make sure not to use too much liquid.
 
Nov 27, 2019
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Well, interestingly enough I was forced to open my PC due to a power outtage
Yes you should not let the fans spin freely, it should not damage anything but there is a chance.

My air cleaning kit is actually a bit funny, I don't buy compressed air, I use a small toy foam water gun that will shoot out decently strong air when pumped. Cheaper and 100% re-usable. Plus you can soak your friends with it :)


Also get a brush to break up the dust/dirt a bit. I just use a cheap artist brush and tape the bristles to the handle more to make sure they don't fall off in the case.

qtips and alcohol are good to use, or use a narrow foam brush for better coverage. Just make sure not to use too much liquid.
I actually thought you were joking but it seems you are being serious, that's very interesting I'll check this out. Cheers for the cleaning tips!
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Well, interestingly enough I was forced to open my PC due to a power outtage


I actually thought you were joking but it seems you are being serious, that's very interesting I'll check this out. Cheers for the cleaning tips!
Yep, it's what I like to use, I actually started when I was at my sister-in-laws place working on their computer and had to clean it up a bit, needed to find a way to blow out the air and noticed they had one of those water noodle guns lying around from the kids and used it. It worked so well I never used caned air at home again.
 

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