Question How do I install my ram

Jan 22, 2020
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I had 8gb of ram on my prebuilt so I bought 16gb (2x8gb) . I'm gonna take that 8gb stick off but how should I install the 2x8gb ram I bought? I have 4 places or whatever they are called. So should I put one stick to the first place and the second stick to the 3rd place. Or should I put them next to each other or does this even matter?
 

Eximo

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Depends on the motherboard. However, typical configuration is as follows. From left to right with the CPU on the left and the rear I/O also to the left.

CPU Slot 1 (empty), Slot 2 (filled), Slot 3 (empty), Slot 4 (filled)

When in doubt, find the manual for the motherboard or system.
 

Eximo

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Well, based on the colors they may have gone for the older configuration of having the pairs next to each other.

Not that big a deal. You can try different configurations relatively quickly. Use something like CPU-Z to check the memory configuration.
 
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It matters some.
Dual channel is faster than siingle channel operation.
Particularly if you are using integrated graphics.

If your motherboard manual is not explicit on where two sticks should be inserted, install the ram in slots 2 and 4, counting from closest to the cpu.

When done, run cpu-Z, it will tell you if you are operating in single channel or dual channel mode.
If single channel, try a different pair of slots.
 
Jan 22, 2020
4
0
10
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Well, based on the colors they may have gone for the older configuration of having the pairs next to each other.

Not that big a deal. You can try different configurations relatively quickly. Use something like CPU-Z to check the memory configuration.
I'm now trying to put the ram inside the sockets but cant do it for some reason. I took the original ram out and now cant even put it back in. I am making sure the hole lines up. any tips?

edit: nvm I just had to use more power. Damned videos saying it just slides in
 

Eximo

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Yeah, can certainly take more force then you would think.

Story time:

So in the early 2000s, Abit was still making motherboards. They were very early adopters of SATA, PCIe, USB. Before any kinks had been worked out.

My friend buys one of their boards. SATA I, DDR memory. He calls me up and asks if I can help him with putting it together. He tried everything to put the memory in but it wasn't going. Double check, right memory for the board, nothing stuck in the slot, just refuses to go it.

We call up Abit, they ask for the serial number. They tell us to put as much force as possible to install the memory, if it breaks, they'll send replacements. Apparently, they've had whole runs with badly molded memory slots, they are literally too small.

My friend goes full force, and he is not a small guy, probably outweighed me by about 50Kg. Board actually cracked in half, but the memory went in, huge bulges at either end in the plastic. RMA number provided, tossed it in a box, and he had a new board about a week later.

Since we hadn't gotten that far in the build, never bothered connecting any drives. One shiny new SATA drive was to go in to replace a literal pile of older hard drives. Go to plug in the cable, and the SATA cable's connector crumbles under its own weight...had to buy one of those cables with the little locking block.

I mentioned the PCIe slots, wasn't this board, pretty sure it was still AGP. Abit boards had a reputation for catching fire when you plugged early PCIe GPUs into the slots. They were supposed to meet a power delivery standard, guess they forgot about that.

They also had the same problem with early USB ports, which I did encounter. Remember those early LED light up mice, usually a transparent scroll wheel. Too much current draw, popped the USB controllers.

If you look them up, they had all kinds of problems in the last few years of operation. They just kept cheaping out on designs and components.
 
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