Question How do I lower my CPU voltage in bios?

May 5, 2020
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I have a Ryzen 9 3900x and my mobo seems to be putting it at a high voltage. 1.488V. From what I’ve gathered I should be at 1.2-1.25 range? It’s idle temp is 43C because of this high voltage I’m assuming?

My motherboard


ASUS AM4 TUF GAMING X570-Plus ATX Motherboard with PCIe 4.0, Dual M.2, 12+2 with Dr. MOS Power Stage, HDMI, DP, SATA 6Gb/s, USB 3.2 Gen 2 and Aura Sync RGB Lighting
https://www.newegg.com/product/N82E16813119198?ignorebbr=1&m_ver=1

My cpu


AMD RYZEN 9 3900X 12-Core 3.8 GHz (4.6 GHz Max Boost) Socket AM4 105W 100-100000023BOX Desktop Processor
https://www.newegg.com/product/N82E16819113103?ignorebbr=1&m_ver=1

Is this the option I want in bios? This “VDDCR CPU Override”?

View: https://imgur.com/a/4VDa8an
 
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May 5, 2020
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Also, do I want to override or offset? I’m not sure if I want either of these options or what the difference is. I just wanna cool down my cpu. I just built this rig and it’s like this after updating bios.
 
Also, do I want to override or offset? I’m not sure if I want either of these options or what the difference is. I just wanna cool down my cpu. I just built this rig and it’s like this after updating bios.
If you're looking to undervolt then offset is probably your better option, just set a negative offset and it will run dynamically at a lower voltage. You can also use override, but that will run the CPU at that override voltage at all times, even when idle.

Another thing you can check in the BIOS would be VID behaviour. At least on Intel Asus boards there are multiple profiles for VID behaviour and if it's set at something like 'worst case' then the board is likely overvolting the chip to ensure stability. You can try some of the lower settings and see if it's stable, though you may run into problems if you are overclocking or if you lost the silicon lottery and got a bad chip that isn't stable without lots of voltage running through it.
 
May 5, 2020
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If you're looking to undervolt then offset is probably your better option, just set a negative offset and it will run dynamically at a lower voltage. You can also use override, but that will run the CPU at that override voltage at all times, even when idle.

Another thing you can check in the BIOS would be VID behaviour. At least on Intel Asus boards there are multiple profiles for VID behaviour and if it's set at something like 'worst case' then the board is likely overvolting the chip to ensure stability. You can try some of the lower settings and see if it's stable, though you may run into problems if you are overclocking or if you lost the silicon lottery and got a bad chip that isn't stable without lots of voltage running through it.
I turned on offset and set it negative and auto and it shot back up to 1.48 volts. It’s crazy. Should I turn it off auto and make it an amount? I have no idea what amount I should make it? I do like this idea better than override but idk what to make the manual offset at to get my desired range.

I don’t see anything VID behavior related in bios unfortunately
 
I turned on offset and set it negative and auto and it shot back up to 1.48 volts. It’s crazy. Should I turn it off auto and make it an amount? I have no idea what amount I should make it? I do like this idea better than override but idk what to make the manual offset at to get my desired range.

I don’t see anything VID behavior related in bios unfortunately
Hmm, do you have Precision Boost Overdrive enabled. If so, try turning it off, that tends to overvolt the CPU to try to push higher clocks for longer.

Also how are you monitoring your voltage? Software readings can sometimes be unreliable and you also shouldn't necessarily look at VID values. VID values are what the CPU requests and not necessarily what the CPU actually gets.

Other than that, you can try setting a manual override voltage, I'd say maybe start it at 1.30 and run stability tests. If you don't crash or bluescreen you can maybe put it lower if temps are too high.
 
May 5, 2020
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Hmm, do you have Precision Boost Overdrive enabled. If so, try turning it off, that tends to overvolt the CPU to try to push higher clocks for longer.

Also how are you monitoring your voltage? Software readings can sometimes be unreliable and you also shouldn't necessarily look at VID values. VID values are what the CPU requests and not necessarily what the CPU actually gets.

Other than that, you can try setting a manual override voltage, I'd say maybe start it at 1.30 and run stability tests. If you don't crash or bluescreen you can maybe put it lower if temps are too high.
precision boost overdrive was auto, I disabled. Also under this tab is Precision boost overdrive scalar (auto), max cpu boost clock overtire (auto) and platform thermal throttle limit (auto)

Im monitoring the voltage off of bios. I have other apps in windows but I’m giving bios numbers here.

this is so anxiety inducing ahh
 

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