Question How do I put my video editing workload on my GPU instead of my CPU ?

Feb 14, 2022
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I recently got into video editing again. I have this editor (Davinci Resolve 18) and it's a good editor for me. The only problem is that it maxes out my cpu when previewing my edits. I want to make my GPU handle it. How do I do that ?
 
Its not really about finding a different editor, rather its about working around the limitations. Most editors use CPU encoding for processing. DaVinci is probably the only editor that uses least amount of it. Still, you need robust CPU support to execute the tasks.
 

USAFRet

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I recently got into video editing again. I have this editor (Davinci Resolve 18) and it's a good editor for me. The only problem is that it maxes out my cpu when previewing my edits. I want to make my GPU handle it. How do I do that ?
"maxes out my CPU"

So what?
Is the overall performance OK? (especially for a free tool)
 

Nine Layer Nige

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I think the GPU can be used for processing the final edit into a finished video file. It sounds like what you want to do is "scrub" through your video known as "scrubbing" and I think that is all processor and SSD power. If you are working with 4K or 1440p video then thats a lot of data to scrub through, especially the data rate on the SSD. An HDD is gonna hurt big time trying this. There are some video editors that use "proxy" files (small versions of your original footage) to enable faster scrubbing and thus require less processor/SSD performance.
Personally, I use VSDC https://www.videosoftdev.com/ . The free version, totally fine for my needs of 1080p full HD content creation, but the paid version can utilise the video card for the final edit and enables a full set of enhanced special effects and gadgets.

Please detail what spec PC you are using, which might indicate the challenge and what resolution and FPS you are working with.

Please list full pc specs

CPU:
GPU:
Mobo:
Ram:
Ram configuration, slots, xmp (on/off) :
PSU:
Storage:
Windows version:
BIOS Version:

Monitor screen resolution refresh rate:

Run UserBenchMark and post a link to the results. It's helpful to the community to see how your system is performing against same spec rigs worldwide.
 

Inthrutheoutdoor

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Does that app have a "enable hardware acceleration" option ? If so that should shift most of the heavy lifting to the GPU....

I had to do this a few years ago with over 120 workstations at my office (3D rendering/CAD machines) cause the tweenybot slackerjackers in IT didn't do it when the set up the machines, cause they didn't know how :D
 
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Nine Layer Nige

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Yes, "enable hardware acceleration" thats an option at the point of "export video" to a video file mp4 etc so it should speed up the final render process. I cant comment if one can use this for scrubbing as I think thats all cpu mulitthread based and massively data intensive.
 

Inthrutheoutdoor

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Yes, "enable hardware acceleration" thats an option at the point of "export video" to a video file mp4 etc so it should speed up the final render process. I cant comment if one can use this for scrubbing as I think thats all cpu mulitthread based and massively data intensive.
Perhaps, but I was referring to the CAD apps I was running, that can perform live, real-time editing & rendering at the same time, mostly by using the GPU's powah.

It mainly used the CPU if/when you needed to do a near/total re-calculation of complex measurements/dimensions/layers etc...
 
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