Question How do I set up multiple networks from 1 incoming line?

billydavies21

Honorable
Aug 23, 2015
23
0
10,510
0
Good afternoon all

I'm not very experienced with networking and would like to check what I should do in my particular situation... I've read through a few posts regarding networking and think I'm on the right track. Here is the situation:

I am taking over the management of an office block. There are several office rooms, each with their own network points, that go to a "network room" of sorts. There's a rack mounted ethernet box thing (sorry i don't know what they are called!).

There is a single phone line into the building that ends up in the network room. I've been quoted for a lease line to give the best connection and speeds possible (apparently). Each room will need it's own secure network, without being able to see devices in other rooms.

Here's a pic of what the setup is like:


What I think the solution would be (based on the "Running a Triple Router Y-Configuration" help I found on a thread), is to have the main line in and connected to the Cisco router. Then, I use the outputs of that to go to separate routers to create new networks. I then use the outputs on those routers to connect to the relevant ports for each room. I assume (and hope) I can do more than a Y-Config, as there are 8 individual rooms. I could also go from the Cisco router to the network ports, then put the routers in each office, so that each one could have it's own wifi too (if that would work).

I may be totally wrong, but this is how far I got before my brain started hurting. Would someone be able to let me know if this is doable, or if I should be doing it a different way? I'm also worried that the Cisco router will only have 4 outputs, meaning I'll be limited to 4 separate networks in the building. I definitely need 8. Can I change the router, use the ethernet port box thingy, or do I need a completely new plan?

Many thanks in advance.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
OMG, you can experiment and learn working with VLAN's on your own home network, but please do not mess with a business network unless you know what you're doing. You are punching way above your paygrade if you don't know what an ethernet switch is called.
 

Phillipson

Honorable
Jun 14, 2016
36
3
10,545
2
Well, I won't be so harsh friend

Internet comes from a device or a wall. From there, it feed into the modem/router. From there it feeds into the switch. The switch is what determines what gets sent where. I'm not a networking Guru but I know this.

Basically, you have multiple rooms with computers that need internet. Everything will feed into the switch. The switch has dedicated ports for certain things. This is where you begin "getting over your head!" Those rooms have their own network jacks, those jacks physically route through the walls; eventually leading to the switch

The Switch is important because it acts as an intersection, a stop light of sorts. Your issue seems to be determining how this all works together; in unison. It's kinda simple, just don't overthink it!

Everything will route to the switch. Everything will route to the "network room". It won't be easy without help. I recommend seeking someone more experinced as networks simply encompass a massive scope. But in basic terms, everything routes to the switch. Don't overthink it, you don't need multiple networks, APs no. Everything will route to (one) switch. Best of luck friend.
 

Phillipson

Honorable
Jun 14, 2016
36
3
10,545
2
I continued reading your post:

The ISP provides the internet. You can have separate networks, that don't see each other without having to physically separate them. Point is: everything feeds into the "network room". The switch ultimately decides what data gets sent where. Your best bet friend is to find someone with more I.T. experience. It is very possible to easily separate networks without much logistics, you just have to know what you're doing! I sincerely wish you the best!
 

palladin9479

Distinguished
Moderator
Jul 26, 2008
3,250
7
20,865
45
It's kinda late but OP is way outside of their league. What they are needing is a multi-port firewall that also acts as the router / internet gateway, there are some small business devices that will do this. We would then either need 3 separate dumb switches or one managed switch with three VLAN's configured. The router / firewall device would be configured to allow each VLAN to communicate to the internet but not to each other via some basic rules and security zones.

While this isn't difficult for those who know what they are doing, for anyone not familiar with basic security / network principles this is going to be very hard to get right.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS