[SOLVED] How do I setup stable CPU Voltage?

Nov 26, 2020
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Hey,
I having a problem with setting up a stable voltage on my Ryzen 5 3600 CPU. Few months ago I got a B450 Gigabyte AORUS Pro motherboard and I'm not sure which option in it's BIOS is resposible for doing this. This question might be stupid, but I wanna be 100% sure that I'm doing it correctly, I dont want to fry my CPU.
In BIOS for voltage I have these options:

Dynamic Vcore(DVID) which is set to -0,204V by itself
Dynamic VCORE SOC (DVID) which is set on auto
DRAM Voltage (which I'm assuming is for the RAM)

Currently I'm running a 4000 MHz at 1,125V in Ryzen Master, but it's getting really annoying to manually set it up every time I turn on the pc. If there is a need, I can provide more bios information.

I really would appreciate any answer, thanks.
 
Finally what I was looking for, thanks. But how do I know what value to type in to make it 1.125V? CPU Vcore in BIOS changes from time to time as its set on auto but I dont know where exactly.
I'm not sure for Gigabyte motherboards since they use this thing called 'dynamic vcore'. I think it's kind of like an offset and doesn't really allow a fixed setting. If so you'd have to calibrate yourself. Set a value then read what it is in HWInfo64, the most reliable utility for Ryzen.

There are going to be two voltage readings to focus on; one is the CPU Core Volts (SVI2 TFN). This the actual core voltage in the CPU, reported out with telemetry. It most accurately tells you what the cores are seeing and changes constantly (with processing load) due to load line losses even with a fixed VCore output.

The other is the VCore voltage in what your motherboard's monitoring chip section is. This the voltage at some point in the loadline and may or may not vary with load; it depends on how the motherboard works (dynamic vcore, remember) and where in the loadline the sense point is.

Once you get an idea what it's doing then you can try finding the right setting to get you close to 1.125V.
 

Tioym

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Apr 5, 2020
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Voltage control is usually in the overclocking section of the BIOS. If you want the same speed at that voltage just just set your multiplier to 40x (which will be 40x100MHz) and then use + - buttons to increase/decrease voltage. You will have to unlock the voltage most of the time and bios should have a setting for "Manual" control.
Save & Exit obv
 
Nov 26, 2020
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Voltage control is usually in the overclocking section of the BIOS. If you want the same speed at that voltage just just set your multiplier to 40x (which will be 40x100MHz) and then use + - buttons to increase/decrease voltage. You will have to unlock the voltage most of the time and bios should have a setting for "Manual" control.
Save & Exit obv
Well, I'm not new to overcloking, but the thing is, this BIOS is really weird to me. I was running i5 4960k for a few years, and the moardboard with it had a pretty clear BIOS with and option called "CPU Voltage" or something like that, this one is different and it doesnt have such thing. All the voltages are in a different tab "advanced voltage settings" so yeah... Maybe those pictures will help:
View: https://imgur.com/a/ST3Qm85
 
Hey,
I having a problem with setting up a stable voltage on my Ryzen 5 3600 CPU. Few months ago I got a B450 Gigabyte AORUS Pro motherboard and I'm not sure which option in it's BIOS is resposible for doing this. This question might be stupid, but I wanna be 100% sure that I'm doing it correctly, I dont want to fry my CPU.
In BIOS for voltage I have these options:

Dynamic Vcore(DVID) which is set to -0,204V by itself
Dynamic VCORE SOC (DVID) which is set on auto
DRAM Voltage (which I'm assuming is for the RAM)

Currently I'm running a 4000 MHz at 1,125V in Ryzen Master, but it's getting really annoying to manually set it up every time I turn on the pc. If there is a need, I can provide more bios information.

I really would appreciate any answer, thanks.
For a ryzen 3000 series CPU it's safer to leave it in AUTO. Setting a fixed voltage does one of three things... leaves the CPU unstable if it's way too low, hurts performance if it's somewhat too low or risks bringing on early degradation even if it's close to 'normal'. That's why AMD has never offered a fixed operating voltage value for their processors; they really think it's safest left in AUTO.

Running it at fixed 4000 Mhz and 1.125V you are definitely hurting performance of a 3600...and especially in light threaded applications like gaming.
 
Nov 26, 2020
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I know what it does. I dont care about performance, I wouldn't post here if I did care about getting the most out of it. It's satysfying enough for me in every task I'm using it in. I want my PC to be silent and cool, auto voltages make CPU's temperatures go from 40 celcius to 55 in 1 second and it triggers my CPU fans to spin like crazy for 2 seconds and then go silent, it happens all the time and I'm going mad with it. Also, setting up custom fan speed in BIOS is not a thing I'm interested in anymore, I've tried it already. Please help me with setting fixed voltage in BIOS.
 
I know what it does. I dont care about performance, I wouldn't post here if I did care about getting the most out of it. It's satysfying enough for me in every task I'm using it in. I want my PC to be silent and cool, auto voltages make CPU's temperatures go from 40 celcius to 55 in 1 second and it triggers my CPU fans to spin like crazy for 2 seconds and then go silent, it happens all the time and I'm going mad with it. Also, setting up custom fan speed in BIOS is not a thing I'm interested in anymore, I've tried it already. Please help me with setting fixed voltage in BIOS.
Stess test it...I'd suggest use the stress test in CPUz as that's sufficient.

If it doesn't crash within an hour or so then decrease the VCore voltage setting a couple notches and repeat the stress test.

If it crashes within an hour or so then increase voltage a couple notches and then repeat the stress. If now it doesn't crash then you found a sweet spot.

Don't concern yourself with what the readout is on the BIOS screen...just increase or decrease the setting based on how it performed in the preceding stress test.

Enjoy.
 
Last edited:
Nov 26, 2020
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Stess test it...I'd suggest use the stress test in CPUz as that's sufficient.

If it doesn't crash within an hour or so then decrease the VCore voltage setting a couple notches and repeat.

Once you find where the system crashes within an hour or so then increase voltage a couple notches and try again. If now it doesn't crash then you found a sweet spot.

Don't concern yourself with what the readout is on the BIOS screen...just increase or decrease the setting based on how it performed in the preceding stress test.

Enjoy.
All I want to know is which setting is 100% responsible for fixed voltage...
 
Nov 26, 2020
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Just CPU Vcore. VCore SoC is for memory controller and (in APU's) the iGPU power.
Finally what I was looking for, thanks. But how do I know what value to type in to make it 1.125V? CPU Vcore in BIOS changes from time to time as its set on auto but I dont know where exactly.
 
Finally what I was looking for, thanks. But how do I know what value to type in to make it 1.125V? CPU Vcore in BIOS changes from time to time as its set on auto but I dont know where exactly.
I'm not sure for Gigabyte motherboards since they use this thing called 'dynamic vcore'. I think it's kind of like an offset and doesn't really allow a fixed setting. If so you'd have to calibrate yourself. Set a value then read what it is in HWInfo64, the most reliable utility for Ryzen.

There are going to be two voltage readings to focus on; one is the CPU Core Volts (SVI2 TFN). This the actual core voltage in the CPU, reported out with telemetry. It most accurately tells you what the cores are seeing and changes constantly (with processing load) due to load line losses even with a fixed VCore output.

The other is the VCore voltage in what your motherboard's monitoring chip section is. This the voltage at some point in the loadline and may or may not vary with load; it depends on how the motherboard works (dynamic vcore, remember) and where in the loadline the sense point is.

Once you get an idea what it's doing then you can try finding the right setting to get you close to 1.125V.
 
Nov 26, 2020
7
0
10
0
I'm not sure for Gigabyte motherboards since they use this thing called 'dynamic vcore'. I think it's kind of like an offset and doesn't really allow a fixed setting. If so you'd have to calibrate yourself. Set a value then read what it is in HWInfo64, the most reliable utility for Ryzen.

There are going to be two voltage readings to focus on; one is the CPU Core Volts (SVI2 TFN). This the actual core voltage in the CPU, reported out with telemetry. It most accurately tells you what the cores are seeing and changes constantly (with processing load) due to load line losses even with a fixed VCore output.

The other is the VCore voltage in what your motherboard's monitoring chip section is. This the voltage at some point in the loadline and may or may not vary with load; it depends on how the motherboard works (dynamic vcore, remember) and where in the loadline the sense point is.

Once you get an idea what it's doing then you can try finding the right setting to get you close to 1.125V.
Thanks a lot, I really appreciate it, will try to set it up.
 

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