Question How do I split tv audio into two rca inputs?

Dec 2, 2020
6
0
10
0
I ordered an LG CX and I want to connect it to bookshelf speakers and a sub. I'm planning to use the edifier r1700bt and klipsch r-120sw, both have rca inputs. The LG CX only has a headphone jack and digital audio output so I'm not sure whats the route to go. I'm very new to just wiring audio but the current idea's I can think of are this and this. I'm not sure either even works. The first has a headphone jack splitter into rca y splitters. The second is just headphone jack to rca into rca splitter. Do any of these work or is there a better way to do this?
 
Dec 2, 2020
6
0
10
0
You will need an amplifier/receiver for that subwoofer, per your manual. For those BlueTooth speakers on the other hand, you will be able to plug them to the TV using the RCA cable you've(illustrated) linked.
It says it has a built-in amplifier. Would I still need to get a receiver? The figure 2 shows the speakers plugging into a preamp which would be the tv right?
 

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
You will need an amplifier/receiver for that subwoofer, per your manual. For those BlueTooth speakers on the other hand, you will be able to plug them to the TV using the RCA cable you've(illustrated) linked.
It says it has a built-in amplifier. Would I still need to get a receiver? The figure 2 shows the speakers plugging into a preamp which would be the tv right?
Yes it is a powered sub, and yes the TV would be classed as the preamp.

However its a really dirty way of connecting stuff and I wouldn't recommend it at all except with budget equipment.

The klipsch I personally wouldn't class as a budget sub (I know many audiophiles would but that's something I'm not)

You'll have no control of bass crossover points and will get feedback from a headphone preout at at low/no volume levels.
Bear in mind a sub does not run constantly and you can imagine why this would be problem.

There are better options out there than what you're listing, some edifiers (1850/1855) come with a dedicated sub out and although still not perfect they're a better option than the 1700's and a ghettorigged rca splitter (you should be using the optical from the TV anyway - it'll be far cleaner with no background interference)

What's your total budget and location/buying options for sub and speakers??
 
Dec 2, 2020
6
0
10
0
Yes it is a powered sub, and yes the TV would be classed as the preamp.

However its a really dirty way of connecting stuff and I wouldn't recommend it at all except with budget equipment.

The klipsch I personally wouldn't class as a budget sub (I know many audiophiles would but that's something I'm not)

You'll have no control of bass crossover points and will get feedback from a headphone preout at at low/no volume levels.
Bear in mind a sub does not run constantly and you can imagine why this would be problem.

There are better options out there than what you're listing, some edifiers (1850/1855) come with a dedicated sub out and although still not perfect they're a better option than the 1700's and a ghettorigged rca splitter (you should be using the optical from the TV anyway - it'll be far cleaner with no background interference)

What's your total budget and location/buying options for sub and speakers??
My budget was $200 for a sub. I already had the r1700bt since July and can't return for a higher model. I had a best buy gift card for $165 so I was limited there and they had an open box Klipsch r-120sw for $230. I've read that that's a pretty decent deal so I jumped on it. I then realized after ordering both the tv and the sub that I have no idea how to connect it. Everything is pretty much set for available equipment. I could look for another sub but my budget is only $200 (with the card) from best buy. Also, you mentioned digital, would it be better to just do a digital to rca converter and split it then? Or is that just as ghetto as the initial idea? If I did get another sub, I don't think there's much that would change as being stuck with the r1700bt with no sub out is really limiting. Neither have audio out either so I can't run a chain or whatever they're called. Honestly, I thought this was budget equipment as a ton of people hate on the Klipsch as you said.

Would something like this be better if I was stuck on ghetto cables? Digital to rca converter into splitting. Sorry I'm new to this audio stuff and don't know much.
 
Last edited:

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
If you already have the equipment then fair enough.

Pointless buying an optical to rca, you'd just be concerting twice.

Both those cable options will work.

The first would be preferable because it makes more sense to split at source and you want that twin 3.5mm splitter that will plug into the TV audio as short as practically possible.

Also keep your 2 x 3.5mm to rca cable runs as short as possible even if it means buying different lengths for sub and edifier speakers (you won't notice any latency between sub and speaker on stretches under 6 or 7) metres.

Because of the lack of any kind of crossover you'll be spending countless hours messing with speaker and sub volume/bass controls to get a decent balance.

That klipsch (irregardless of whether its audiophile quality or not) will easily completely overpower those little edifiers if you let it.

And yes you'll get completely slated by any kind of 'audiophile' for the way you have it setup but it's a needs must kind of scenario.
 
Dec 2, 2020
6
0
10
0
If you already have the equipment then fair enough.

Pointless buying an optical to rca, you'd just be concerting twice.

Both those cable options will work.

The first would be preferable because it makes more sense to split at source and you want that twin 3.5mm splitter that will plug into the TV audio as short as practically possible.

Also keep your 2 x 3.5mm to rca cable runs as short as possible even if it means buying different lengths for sub and edifier speakers (you won't notice any latency between sub and speaker on stretches under 6 or 7) metres.

Because of the lack of any kind of crossover you'll be spending countless hours messing with speaker and sub volume/bass controls to get a decent balance.

That klipsch (irregardless of whether its audiophile quality or not) will easily completely overpower those little edifiers if you let it.

And yes you'll get completely slated by any kind of 'audiophile' for the way you have it setup but it's a needs must kind of scenario.
I don’t really know what a crossover is. Does the low pass knob on the back serve the same purpose? The manual says set it anywhere from 90hz-150hz for bookshelf speakers. What’s the ideal way to go about this? I don’t really know what would work besides splitting or getting a receiver. Would the receiver be the crossover? Is it worth it to invest in a cheap receiver for ~$100 or something?

How come using the digital converter is the same as using the headphone jack? Does it lose quality converting or is it because it converts twice as you said which is the same thing?
 
Last edited:

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
I ordered an LG CX and I want to connect it to bookshelf speakers and a sub. I'm planning to use the edifier r1700bt and klipsch r-120sw, both have rca inputs. The LG CX only has a headphone jack and digital audio output so I'm not sure whats the route to go. I'm very new to just wiring audio but the current idea's I can think of are this and this. I'm not sure either even works. The first has a headphone jack splitter into rca y splitters. The second is just headphone jack to rca into rca splitter. Do any of these work or is there a better way to do this?
Did you already buy the speakers and sub?
 

madmatt30

Titan
Ambassador
My budget was $200 for a sub. I already had the r1700bt since July and can't return for a higher model. I had a best buy gift card for $165 so I was limited there and they had an open box Klipsch r-120sw for $230. I've read that that's a pretty decent deal so I jumped on it. I then realized after ordering both the tv and the sub that I have no idea how to connect it. Everything is pretty much set for available equipment. I could look for another sub but my budget is only $200 (with the card) from best buy. Also, you mentioned digital, would it be better to just do a digital to rca converter and split it then? Or is that just as ghetto as the initial idea? If I did get another sub, I don't think there's much that would change as being stuck with the r1700bt with no sub out is really limiting. Neither have audio out either so I can't run a chain or whatever they're called. Honestly, I thought this was budget equipment as a ton of people hate on the Klipsch as you said.

Would something like this be better if I was stuck on ghetto cables? Digital to rca converter into splitting. Sorry I'm new to this audio stuff and don't know much.
I don’t really know what a crossover is. Does the low pass knob on the back serve the same purpose? The manual says set it anywhere from 90hz-150hz for bookshelf speakers. What’s the ideal way to go about this? I don’t really know what would work besides splitting or getting a receiver. Would the receiver be the crossover? Is it worth it to invest in a cheap receiver for ~$100 or something?

How come using the digital converter is the same as using the headphone jack? Does it lose quality converting or is it because it converts twice as you said which is the same thing?
Yes the low pass on the sub controls the frequency that it will output.

90-100htz is about right, at that it will only pass low bass frequencies through which is what you want.

The issue is the edifier will also receive a full range signal.

When you use a home receiver the crossover is set on the receiver itself, it will then only pass frequencies below the set crossover to the sub and frequencies above the crossover to the speakers.

This is the 'correct' way to run bookshelf speaker with a subwoofer in theory.

What a home recievr also does is take over and maintain a set volume between sub and speakers.

Once you've set it up in essence it will always be balanced without you ever having to mess around again.

The issue with a splitter and your edifier is you end up with independant volume/bass/treble controls from the subwoofer.

Which means once you've balanced volume and bass/treble out between the need to leave all the controls on the edifiers alone.

The splitter is absolutely doable, it just complicates setting a decent audio balance up between the two.

A reciever wouldn't help you anyway because those edifiers are powered speakers, you would want passive bookshelves to use a receiver.

Also $100 wouldn't get you anything decent.

Buy the splitter cables, have a play around and try it out, ypu may be happy with it.
 
Dec 2, 2020
6
0
10
0
Yes the low pass on the sub controls the frequency that it will output.

90-100htz is about right, at that it will only pass low bass frequencies through which is what you want.

The issue is the edifier will also receive a full range signal.

When you use a home receiver the crossover is set on the receiver itself, it will then only pass frequencies below the set crossover to the sub and frequencies above the crossover to the speakers.

This is the 'correct' way to run bookshelf speaker with a subwoofer in theory.

What a home recievr also does is take over and maintain a set volume between sub and speakers.

Once you've set it up in essence it will always be balanced without you ever having to mess around again.

The issue with a splitter and your edifier is you end up with independant volume/bass/treble controls from the subwoofer.

Which means once you've balanced volume and bass/treble out between the need to leave all the controls on the edifiers alone.

The splitter is absolutely doable, it just complicates setting a decent audio balance up between the two.

A reciever wouldn't help you anyway because those edifiers are powered speakers, you would want passive bookshelves to use a receiver.

Also $100 wouldn't get you anything decent.

Buy the splitter cables, have a play around and try it out, ypu may be happy with it.
Thanks for the info. Very helpful and detailed.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS