How do I test for leakage of the Kraken X52?

Tslap

Commendable
Jun 30, 2017
54
1
1,535
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Hey guys,

I know that AIO water coolers tend to have leaks in their tubing as it's not impossible for that situation to occur. I just received my Kraken X52 in the mail. Does anybody have any suggestions as to how I should test for leakage before I'm rest assured that my components won't get destroyed from leakage because of the AIO?

Thanks.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Anything with liquid in it can leak, there is no such thing as 100% sure. Even high-dollar, custom watercooling systems can and do leak in some circumstances, many user-error, some are manufacturing flaws.

If there are not any noticeable signs of coolant leaking and the radiator feels full with minimal sloshing, you should be good. Sloshing of coolant isn't necessarily a good thing as it indicates air (lack of coolant) is present allowing free movement of liquid, but minimal sloshing is far better than 'a lot of sloshing'. It is difficult to fill AIO coolers without any air pockets, so just be aware of what you're hearing.

With an AIO cooler, there really isn't much to be careful with other than pulling on tubing or rotating fittings that shouldn't be messed with. The entire idea is that you just install the cooler as you would any normal cooler.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
AIO coolers don't tend to have leaks; they shouldn't, otherwise having a 'tendency' means the majority of the products are defective in nature, if so.

You should visually inspect the cooler to see if there area any 'weep' areas where coolant may have slowly dripped from the cooler. Otherwise, you can setup your PC with the 24 pin ATX pins jumped to provide power to auxiliary components but doesn't allow the machine to boot up. There are several guides on this, including my watercooling sticky, and there are even special ATX jumper connections to make this simpler.
 

Tslap

Commendable
Jun 30, 2017
54
1
1,535
0
Oops. Yeah what I meant to say was AIO coolers "can" have leaks. I had poor word-choice here.

Thanks for the advice. I'll look into it. Although after careful inspection, I'm very tempted to just start building my computer and have it running. I was thinking about possibly taking a paper towel and putting it over my GPU for a little bit to see if there were any leaks and if there were, the paper towel would obviously be wet, but I think that this method is kind of inefficient as once the paper towel is wet, that would mean my other components are wet as well so it would be too late. And the paper towel would be gathering up heat.



 

Major_Trouble

Distinguished
Jun 25, 2007
715
11
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I've used 5x AIO coolers from the early days and not one of them has leaked. I don't expect a quality brand like NZXT to be any different. I use AIO because I dislike having around 1kg of weight hanging off 4x holes in my motherboard. If I used a horizontal style motherboard case I'd be using high end air coolers for sure.

AIO don't use high pressures to push fluid through their plumbing so if they're not showing any unlikely visual signs of leakage before assembly they're unlikely to be leaking once installed. Placing a paper towel on the back of your gpu really isn't a good idea. They get pretty warm in use and you would just be adding a potential fire risk.

If you're so worried about AIO coolers perhaps you should of just gone the air cooler route instead.
 

Tslap

Commendable
Jun 30, 2017
54
1
1,535
0
No, I'm not worried about leakage. I'm just trying to be cautious. Someone else commented on another post that I made and they said AIO water coolers are known for leakages and should be careful and almost not trust them. But I do trust them. It's just that it's my first time putting a water cooler in my desktop, so I want take as little risk/chance as possible with ruining my computer since it's a very expensive computer build.

Thanks for your input though. It was helpful. ^_^



 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Anything with liquid in it can leak, there is no such thing as 100% sure. Even high-dollar, custom watercooling systems can and do leak in some circumstances, many user-error, some are manufacturing flaws.

If there are not any noticeable signs of coolant leaking and the radiator feels full with minimal sloshing, you should be good. Sloshing of coolant isn't necessarily a good thing as it indicates air (lack of coolant) is present allowing free movement of liquid, but minimal sloshing is far better than 'a lot of sloshing'. It is difficult to fill AIO coolers without any air pockets, so just be aware of what you're hearing.

With an AIO cooler, there really isn't much to be careful with other than pulling on tubing or rotating fittings that shouldn't be messed with. The entire idea is that you just install the cooler as you would any normal cooler.
 

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