Question How do old OSs can run on a Virtual Machine running on hardware that doesn't support old OSs?

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
I'm working on insertion of drivers for new hardware into old operating systems that are not compatible with the new hardware I want them to run on. I find the process hard, so I would like to find some tricks.

So, can someone explain to me how old operating systems can run on virtual machine that is installed on new hardware that isn't supported by the OS?

Although the VM is installed on hardware that doesn't support the OS, the OS can work, while the new hardware is still new, and the old OS is still old.

Does VM insert hardware-compatible drivers into the OS, so the OS can become compatible with the hardware?

How do virtual machines work?

I really need to know how it happen. Also, I want to know, is it possible to use VM to produce drivers for new hardware, then insert the drivers into the unsupported OS, buy physical, not virtual but physical, hardware, and the OS be 100% compatible?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,221
11,694
176,090
24,278
The translation code is built into the VM code.
It has its own "drivers".

This, in VirtualBox, with a Win 11 host:


Also, I want to know, is it possible to use VM to produce drivers for new hardware, then insert the drivers into the unsupported OS, buy physical, not virtual but physical, hardware, and the OS be 100% compatible?
No.
Driver code is written by a human.
 
Reactions: TheFlash1300
A virtual machine simulates very basic (old) hardware like a standard VGA display adapter for example, all of the hardware that is simulated is very basic and depending on which OS you select to install it might even change that up to conform to the specific OS.
 
I'm working on insertion of drivers for new hardware into old operating systems that are not compatible with the new hardware I want them to run on. I find the process hard, so I would like to find some tricks.
First of all, you're not even going to get a step in unless you're an expert in Windows system software and driver development of the hardware you want to run on an older OS. And even if you get a step in, Windows' driver model has changed drastically over the years. For instance, the way video card drivers work on Windows 10 is vastly different than how even those on XP worked, and it'll only get worse with Windows 9x.

So, can someone explain to me how old operating systems can run on virtual machine that is installed on new hardware that isn't supported by the OS?

Although the VM is installed on hardware that doesn't support the OS, the OS can work, while the new hardware is still new, and the old OS is still old.

Does VM insert hardware-compatible drivers into the OS, so the OS can become compatible with the hardware?

How do virtual machines work?

I really need to know how it happen. Also, I want to know, is it possible to use VM to produce drivers for new hardware, then insert the drivers into the unsupported OS, buy physical, not virtual but physical, hardware, and the OS be 100% compatible?
Virtual machines emulate hardware that the guest OS can support if the hardware on the host computer isn't available for virtualization or is not natively supported by the guest OS. You'll find in most cases VirtualBox or Windows Virtual PC when running something like Windows 98 or older will emulate an S3 Trio GPU, an Intel 400 or 800 series chipset, and a SoundBlaster 16. Similarly basic peripherals are emulated as necessary. It's fairly easy to translate USB keyboard and mouse inputs into the PS/2 format.

VirtualBox used to emulate a GeForce 6800 if you were running Windows XP, but for some reason (they claimed a security issue) they got rid of that.

If you want to use your current hardware on older OSes, it's easier to just emulate something the OS understands than to make the OS understand your hardware. Or to put in another way, it's easier for modern technology to build the Roman coliseums than it is to make Roman construction technology build the Burj Khalifa.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY