Question How Good Are Our Prebuilts?

Feb 11, 2019
28
0
30
0
So we want to start selling our own prebuilts soon, and so we've been going around and asking people in the PC community if our prebuilts are good, well balanced, and have a competitive price? So in your opinion, how is our line-up looking so far? Are they ready yet or are there any changes you would make? And if you need any more explanation for any of it just let me know!

 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
You should probably aim for more RAM on your higher end models, 16GB feels a bit out of place when you are dumping so much money on 3900x based systems. (plus customers like alot of RAM)
The other thing to consider is how similar all these prebuilts really are, personally I would cut down the choices by half, you dont need 4 3700x based systems and a 3800x system, they are all a bit too similar.
 
Feb 11, 2019
28
0
30
0
You should probably aim for more RAM on your higher end models, 16GB feels a bit out of place when you are dumping so much money on 3900x based systems. (plus customers like alot of RAM)
The other thing to consider is how similar all these prebuilts really are, personally I would cut down the choices by half, you dont need 4 3700x based systems and a 3800x system, they are all a bit too similar.
The reason we do have so many choices is because one of our key aims is to have a "PC for every budget", so that's why we even have 2 that are £30 apart on the low end. Also we didn't add any more RAM as we didn't feel it's really necessary in any builds, but now we'll for sure have it for a "pro" version of that last PC on there.
How do they compare with other prebuilts in your market?
Do they come with a known valid Windows 10 license? (not fleabay or similar...a real license)
Warranty?
Compared to others, we haven't found any so far that beat these in the performance you get for each given price, and in many cases you usually pay way more and get worse components than with us, so thankfully that should give us a good edge. They also all come with valid Windows 10 licences, and all our PCs are covered by free repairs for 6 years, however for any parts we need to replace the customer has to pay if it's after the first 6 months. However we also accept heavily modified builds for free repairs. As long as the motherboard and case are still the same we will accept it, everything else they could've upgraded.
 
(I'm in the US)
Your listings look average to above average. Of course there are small holes to poke here and there, but I understand you're trying to hit a price point with a demographic that doesn't fully understand/appreciate component selection.

I think I can speak for many in saying that typical pre-builts come with:
  • Shoddy A320 motherboards with 2 RAM slots (since you're primarily AMD it appears)
  • Shoddy PSUs that aren't even 80+ Bronze certified
  • Lacking/Vague details about what brand/model each component is
  • Generally cases are on the lower end. Typically only with the included 1-2 fans even though the system inside may need more
  • Comically small SSDs (240GB should be minimum these days, 500GB once you get to the mid tier). Consider that (like HDDs) there's a base cost just to buy an SSD of any capacity (every SSD needs a controller, PCB, casing (for 2.5" drives) which all need to be assembled and shipped, and the only difference is varying amounts of flash memory). Oftentimes, the price difference between 120GB to 240GB is almost nothing, and 240GB to 500GB is ~$15.
  • 1TB HDD - Just a spec bump. These usually cost the same as 2TB HDDs at retail. Same rules apply as with SSDs.
  • Uneducated sales staff
  • Varying levels of customer service. Generally as poor as they can get away with.
I would use those "cardinal sins" as a gauge for where you stand. Now, a lot of that comes from the race to the bottom. Provide the absolute cheapest PC with specs that grab the attention of buyers that don't know anything about components. If you're the cheapest, you don't have to market yourself, the price does all the talking for a large group of buyers.

If you present the stats as you've laid them out here, I applaud you for being upfront and transparent about what the buyer is getting. That also opens you up to your prices being easy to shop out. That's not always a bad thing as long as you're not gouging on prices, and not every buyer is going to put in the effort to check. Plus if you're (presumably) beating retail value with volume purchases and such, you're probably getting very close to the look-up "retail value" of all the components which buyers will see as a bonus since they're paying a very small premium for assembly and customer service.

Will you also offer customization options from your own website? Places like iBuyPower/Cyberpower/etc sell pre-builts on 3rd party retailers (Amazon/Newegg/etc) but they also have robust websites of their own where customers can choose each component THEY want. Not sure if a self-hosted marketplace is part of your business model.

Fair warning - The reason the MSI RX570/RX580 Armor OC cards are the cheapest is because they have a bad reputation. If you're going to use them, put some thought/effort into counteracting the effects of card sag that has plagued these. That can be as simple as "hanging" the end of the card by the PCIe power cable.
 
Last edited:
Feb 11, 2019
28
0
30
0
(I'm in the US)
Your listings look average to above average. Of course there are small holes to poke here and there, but I understand you're trying to hit a price point with a demographic that doesn't fully understand/appreciate component selection.

I think I can speak for many in saying that typical pre-builts come with:
  • Shoddy A320 motherboards with 2 RAM slots (since you're primarily AMD it appears)
  • Shoddy PSUs that aren't even 80+ Bronze certified
  • Lacking/Vague details about what brand/model each component is
  • Generally cases are on the lower end. Typically only with the included 1-2 fans even though the system inside may need more
  • Comically small SSDs (240GB should be minimum these days, 500GB once you get to the mid tier). Consider that (like HDDs) there's a base cost just to buy an SSD of any capacity (every SSD needs a controller, PCB, casing (for 2.5" drives) which all need to be assembled and shipped, and the only difference is varying amounts of flash memory). Oftentimes, the price difference between 120GB to 240GB is almost nothing, and 240GB to 500GB is ~$15.
  • 1TB HDD - Just a spec bump. These usually cost the same as 2TB HDDs at retail. Same rules apply as with SSDs.
  • Uneducated sales staff
  • Varying levels of customer service. Generally as poor as they can get away with.
I would use those "cardinal sins" as a gauge for where you stand. Now, a lot of that comes from the race to the bottom. Provide the absolute cheapest PC with specs that grab the attention of buyers that don't know anything about components. If you're the cheapest, you don't have to market yourself, the price does all the talking for a large group of buyers.

If you present the stats as you've laid them out here, I applaud you for being upfront and transparent about what the buyer is getting. That also opens you up to your prices being easy to shop out. That's not always a bad thing as long as you're not gouging on prices, and not every buyer is going to put in the effort to check. Plus if you're (presumably) beating retail value with volume purchases and such, you're probably getting very close to the look-up "retail value" of all the components which buyers will see as a bonus since they're paying a very small premium for assembly and customer service.

Will you also offer customization options from your own website? Places like iBuyPower/Cyberpower/etc sell pre-builts on 3rd party retailers (Amazon/Newegg/etc) but they also have robust websites of their own where customers can choose each component THEY want. Not sure if a self-hosted marketplace is part of your business model.

Fair warning - The reason the MSI RX570/RX580 Armor OC cards are the cheapest is because they have a bad reputation. If you're going to use them, put some thought/effort into counteracting the effects of card sag that has plagued these. That can be as simple as "hanging" the end of the card by the PCIe power cable.
Yeah we noticed that many other companies just use things like A320 boards in super expensive builds, so we hope we can show off with the fact we don't to try and get a few more customers. Also no, there won't be customisation options, that's one of the reasons there are so many possible PCs.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS