How Google is Making Chrome Faster and Smoother

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blppt

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This is actually a huge bonus for me---before, Chrome would get slightly annoying with the (brief) spinning wheel for certain JS and flash-heavy website loading, but with the latest beta, its completely gone. Well done, Google.
 

burkhartmj

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Stop being a fear-mongering troll.
 

irish_adam

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Be a good citezen and install Chrome. Make it as easy as possible for the NSA to ensure you are not a threat to our national security.
The ignorance is strong in this one. Google complies with the same rules as every other browser and search company operating in the US. You think you are safer on firefox or IE? if you do then you are a fool
 

thechief73

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I use chrome due to it best meeting design and features I want, but I am far from happy with it. It has been terrible at loading certain big name sites for many months. From margin errors to just completely falling on its face needing several refreshes to get pages to load. The development team must be blind, def, and dumb. They consistently remove good useful features, add pointless things and force you to use them, and completely ignore users suggestions for YEARS! How about custom install directory, or option for new tab page address, or turn off the newly designed tab page, allow to customize and/or lock most visited sites like we could back in v.18 and previous, make the search bar work in the page instead of snapping to the browser bar, or bring back recently closed tabs in some form or another. List goes on and on. Get it together Chrome, makes me wonder what you guys are thinking every "update" and I'm not even close to a software developer, just know how to use common sense.
 

lockhrt999

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Current version of chrome stutters when opened very heavy websites. Older versions didn't have this problem. On the other hand FF doesn't have any problem with heavy websites.
 

JD88

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It's also funny considering Google has been leading the charge when it comes to pushing for changes in the way the government is able to collect data. The best web browser just keeps getting better.
 

zanny

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Be a good citezen and install Chrome. Make it as easy as possible for the NSA to ensure you are not a threat to our national security.
The ignorance is strong in this one. Google complies with the same rules as every other browser and search company operating in the US. You think you are safer on firefox or IE? if you do then you are a fool
Chromium and FF are foss, feel free to audit their code for any exploit vectors the NSA can use, and if you don't trust whoever is compiling the binaries you download, compile it yourself.You can also be sure that if anyone tried to add backdoors for a single nations government agencies to two massive international collaborative projects, someone would call foul on that.Chrome does have Google additions, so maybe they are adding backdoors. IE is a complete black box.
 

nikolayivanov321

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Be a good citezen and install Chrome. Make it as easy as possible for the NSA to ensure you are not a threat to our national security.
Because the other browsers are totally safe and nobody will ever spy on you through them, right?
 

Grandmastersexsay

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Rules? Are you retarded? Who makes up these rules? There are no rules baring Chrome from tracking your browsing behavior.

It is a pretty well established fact that Chrome exists specifically for data mining. Do you think Google provides Chrome out of the goodness of their hearts? They make the lions share of their money through targeted advertising.

It is also a well established fact that Google freely provides information to the NSA and other government agencies, without requiring any warrant or probable cause. There have even been several instances where Google has admitted to directly inserting NSA code into their products.

We're not even talking about anything conspiratorial, like Google not having to bid on government contracts, and it should still give a chill up the spine of anyone with a shred of common sense.

Are browsers like Firefox, that aren't designed for data mining from the ground up, safer? The answer is an obvious, YES, of course they are safer. Can you trust these open source programs to not share your information? Of course not. The NSA et al. can and do insert their code into open source projects. SELinux is one example. It is also rather probable that they insert their code superstitiously at times as well. However, browsers like Firefox at least have the possibility of providing some privacy. There is no such possibility with Chrome.

Browsers that aren't designed for data mining, like Firefox, are inherently more secure.

 

JD88

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This is complete uneducated nonsense.

First off, Google has been at the forefront of combating Prism, filing multiple lawsuits against the federal government that demand additional transparency.

Next, there is NSA code in Android, but it has nothing to do with backdoor spying. It's in the Android Security Enhancement project which makes the OS more secure against threats. It's been a part of Linux for years. The code is open source, you can go see what it does for yourself.

http://www.zdnet.com/why-you-shouldnt-worry-that-the-nsa-is-inside-androids-code-7000018040/

Finally, both Internet Explorer and Firefox operate in exactly the same way. Internet Explorer gathers information for Microsoft and thus Bing and Firefox has an agreement with Google to provide search results for it. That's Mozilla's primary avenue of income: Google. All three companies have access to user data on their servers and would equally be capable of providing that information to anyone.

 

Fierce Guppy

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Be a good citezen and install Chrome. Make it as easy as possible for the NSA to ensure you are not a threat to our national security.
Oh, don't worry about that. The NSA scans only for certain content like "semtex shipment arriving at noon" "rendezvous point outside Astor Plaza, Times Square, 12:45" "handler code name: 'Grandmastersexsay'" "??? ????"
 

Grandmastersexsay

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Your fanboyism might not be dangerous, but your misrepresentation of the facts are.

Google never said boo about Prism or the NSA until they started taking heat for it. Before that they had a good time charging the Feds $25/person for domestic surveillance. I also wouldn't say Google is at the forefront of battling Prism. The fact that they continue to work with the NSA on many different fronts speaks more to their intent than a few small mock protests.

I did already mention SELinux. That is the acknowledged code that is in Android. If you don't think the NSA wrote that with the intention of putting in a back door, fine. You are an idiot, but fine. What about all those apps on the Play Store, like Angry Birds and Candy Crush, that have been shown to include back doors used by the NSA? Do you really think that made it past Google unnoticed when they reviewed the source code?

You are also misrepresenting Mozilla's contract with Google. They do not have "an agreement with Google to provide search results..." Google agreed to pay Mozilla to make Google Firefox's default search provider. There are a few other small odds and ends, but that is a far cry from a browser designed for data mining.

If you are curious what is involved in severing all Google Firefox ties look at this:

http://www.leavegooglebehind.com/how-tos/how-to-eradicate-google-from-firefox/

You will notice there is very little to do.
 

Grandmastersexsay

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I was just noticing all the pro Google feedback. I didn't realize there were so many functioning retards on this site. This is why they don't think twice about invading your privacy, because there are so many morons out there who just don't care. I hope your stupidity and lack of vigelence is repaid upon you in the form of pain for what you have allowed to happen to our society. A-Holes, everyone of you.
 

irish_adam

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Its not fanboyism its realism

I understand the reality of the situation, a situation that does not effect me in any way at all. Google mines my info to target ads at me and thats fine, i agree to that when i use their FREE services. I in turn block those ads so it does not affect me.

As for the NSA, anyone that doesnt think that their government is not spying on them is delusional. When all this came out it really did not surprise me at all. Realisticly there is nothing that i can do about that (for 1 i live outside the US, though my government is just as bad) In the US you could put up enough of a fight that the government would agree to change things, put safegaurds in place etc.. However they would still carry on, they would just lie and say they werent. Just like they've been shown to be lying before all this snowden stuff started.

As for the likes of companies being complicit is this, i think your wrong. It is far from being in their best interest to hand over user data without a fight. Google only hands over data when it legally has to the same as any other company with a physical presence in your country. Hell google even emails you to say that your data has been requested unless they receive a gagging order. If the NSA had unlimited access to google data why did it do to such lengths to intercept their data over the fibre cables between data centres?

we're not misrepresenting the facts your just not telling any
 

alextheblue

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It's also funny considering Google has been leading the charge when it comes to pushing for changes in the way the government is able to collect data.
Google just doesn't like the competition, that's all.

Anyway, Google - especially Eric Schmidt - didn't seem to care until Snowden's leaks started coming out and it showed that Google was either complicit or was ignorant of their vulnerabilities. Remember the leaked NSA slide that showed how Google's cloud was unencrypted internally and how the NSA has been taking advantage of that? Schmidt went from "NSA is cool bro, spying is normal these days lulz" to "This is unacceptable! Raaage!" just like someone threw a switch.
Next, there is NSA code in Android, but it has nothing to do with backdoor spying. It's in the Android Security Enhancement project which makes the OS more secure against threats. It's been a part of Linux for years. The code is open source, you can go see what it does for yourself.
Just like the intentionally flawed encryption the NSA pushed out through the RSA years ago, that we only just recently discovered was compromised? If you think anything the NSA puts out is purely a security "enhancement", you've got your head in the sand. They don't do anything out of the goodness of their hearts. If the NSA wants you to use XYZ encryption method, then it must be trivial for them to bypass it, and thus getting Google to standardize on it only benefits the NSA.
 

JD88

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No company said anything until the Snowden leak because it would have been illegal to do so. That includes Apple, Microsoft, Google, and whomever else you might happen to be in love with. No one said anything at all. Also, its not unusual for law enforcement to help top tech companies with security.

Rush Limbaugh combined with Microsoft PR must have a really convincing effect on the weak minded that troll around Tom's.

There are too many fanatical tea party wannabees out there.
 

Grandmastersexsay

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Nothing became legal after the Snowden leak. These companies were under all the same gag orders they are now. You really have no idea what you are talking about. Everyone of those companies you mentioned were profiting from selling personal data to federal agencies. These federal agencies were saving time and money by not having to get warrants and court orders. Everyone was content to remain silent, not out of a legal necessity, but because their arrangements and contracts were mutually beneficial to all parties involved, besides the American public of course.




That is some of the stupidest shit I have heard in a long time.

Rush Limbaugh loves the NSA, the Patriot Act, ect. He's even a huge Apple fan. If he has said anything negative about the NSA, his only intention was to criticize Obama. Despite what he might say, Rush loves big government.

Please don't try to associate that Neocon with popular Libertarian ideas.
 

Grandmastersexsay

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This is where you are just dead wrong.

You are misinterpreting statements from Google like, ”We disclose user data to government in accordance with the law”. That doesn't mean they are following the law by complying with government requests. That means they are not breaking the law by complying with government requests. There is a huge difference. Google could easily require more than a simple request to turn over user data. Why don't they? Simple, not only are they complicit with the government spying on the American public, but they also profit from it. It was even discovered that Google was designing virtual "spying rooms" to aid the government and increase Google's profitability.


Report: NSA Pays Tech Companies for Data:

http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2013/08/23/report-nsa-pays-tech-companies-for-data/

Revealed: Google and Facebook DID allow NSA access to data and were in talks to set up 'spying rooms' despite denials by Zuckerberg and Page over PRISM project:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2337863/PRISM-Google-Facebook-DID-allow-NSA-access-data-talks-set-spying-rooms-despite-denials-Zuckerberg-Page-controversial-project.html
 

Max Thorpe

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I'm against snooping too. Hate Chrome only for that one reason. But sometimes I feel sorry for the search engine giant. When a government agency asks a reputed company for data its just hard to say no! Its not impossible but it certainly is hard going against the law. They can go the tpb way but that would make them less accessible and the government will bring it down time and again. Its hard to say who is right. We the people are concerned for our own privacy. The government is concerned about national security and want to prevent any terrorist attacks before even the foundations are laid. And then there's Google, caught in the balancing act, criticized by both the sides. This is a mess!
 
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