[SOLVED] how i can connect my dedicated graphic card to laptop screen?

Jan 23, 2022
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Hi, I have been trying to turn off the integrated graphics card for about half a year. My point is to connect a Dedicated Graphics Card to the laptop screen. and turn off the integre because it generates a lot of heat. It is AMD Radeon 540 and Vega 8. I do not have such an option in bios, there are also no advanced options. I can have 2 cards or 1 integrated. There is no such option in amd radeon software anymore. When I turn off the integrated graphics card in the device manager, the microsoft card turns on. Is it possible to connect the laptop screen to a dedicated graphics card without disassembling it? It is a laptop lenovo ideapad 330. I know that on nvidia you can do it, my friend also turned off the integrated card and it helped him. I don't have such options in amd catalyst either. I list the specifications below:
AMD Radeon 540
AMD vega 8
Ryzen 5 2500U
256 gb ssd sata
8 gb ram dual channel ddr4
Windows 10
Lenovo ideapad 330
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
I think there is too much of a language barrier here for a proper technical explanation.

Not Nvidia, so no comparisons can be made there. Every hardware configuration is different. How they connected the internal display to the graphics output will vary from design to design.

As I said it is likely the internal display is connected directly to the APU. The GPU needs it running to pass its display signal out.

Physically, no you can't just move the connector inside the laptop. If you mean through software, it is already doing that when you tell it to use one graphics option, otherwise it wouldn't work.

Basically have two low end GPUs. One with dedicated VRAM and one without. I think the Vega 8 GPU is better, but it is slowed down my the system memory. The more you have and the more you allocate to it the better it will perform. The reason you likely see the 540 not reach 100% is because the CPU and GPU is throttling. When they are both running you have a lot of heat to dissipate.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Microsoft card?

Probably using the display output of the iGPU to carry the signal from the 540, you likely can't turn it off completely.

Laptop screens don't really have inputs that will work with standard display outputs, not to mention you would need a computer to plug the graphics card into. Might as well build a desktop at that point.

Vega 8 is generally considered a little better than the Radeon 540. The dedicated VRAM is what makes the difference, so replace as much of your system ram as possible with the best supported speed, disable the discrete graphics. While in there, re-paste the CPU to drop the temps a little.
 
Jan 23, 2022
12
1
15
0
Microsoft card?

Probably using the display output of the iGPU to carry the signal from the 540, you likely can't turn it off completely.

Laptop screens don't really have inputs that will work with standard display outputs, not to mention you would need a computer to plug the graphics card into. Might as well build a desktop at that point.

Vega 8 is generally considered a little better than the Radeon 540. The dedicated VRAM is what makes the difference, so replace as much of your system ram as possible with the best supported speed, disable the discrete graphics. While in there, re-paste the CPU to drop the temps a little.
I am not able to frame an integer. Everything is blocked in my bios. And am I sure I am not able to connect the screen to the radeon 540? As far as I know, there is such a thing in nvidia experience. More I wanted to use only radeon 540 for better fps. On vega 8 it often gets less fps and clippings. The only thing that surprises me is that the radeon 540 does not work 100% when playing and with low fps, unlike the integrated.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
I think there is too much of a language barrier here for a proper technical explanation.

Not Nvidia, so no comparisons can be made there. Every hardware configuration is different. How they connected the internal display to the graphics output will vary from design to design.

As I said it is likely the internal display is connected directly to the APU. The GPU needs it running to pass its display signal out.

Physically, no you can't just move the connector inside the laptop. If you mean through software, it is already doing that when you tell it to use one graphics option, otherwise it wouldn't work.

Basically have two low end GPUs. One with dedicated VRAM and one without. I think the Vega 8 GPU is better, but it is slowed down my the system memory. The more you have and the more you allocate to it the better it will perform. The reason you likely see the 540 not reach 100% is because the CPU and GPU is throttling. When they are both running you have a lot of heat to dissipate.
 

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