how iphones screen is better than that of an androids ?

maneyrocks

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if iPhone 7plus' 1080p screen has lesser PPI than a 1080p android screen, then how come it supports 1440p youtube video, but androids max out on 1080p?
 

Gam3r01

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I dont know exactly what you are comparing, but android is just an OS, not an indication of every phone.
Take a look at the V40 for example:
6.4-inch OLED FullVision display
538ppi
3,120 x 1,440 resolution
Corning Gorilla Glass 5
19.5:9 aspect ratio
HDR10-capable
https://www.androidauthority.com/lg-v40-specs-901187/
 
software differences I guess.
Doesn't matter since even though you say it's letting you pick the 1440p option in a YouTube video, you're not seeing 1440p, you're only seeing 1080p.
So unless you're saying that you have personally seen the difference of quality on both devices, it's a mute point.

The reason you don't get an option for a resolution higher than what your phone's display is capable of is simply because it's resolution your phone's screen isn't capable of truly displaying. And the YouTube app intelligently recognizes this and disables the option since, because you won't see any visual difference, you'd just be wasting bandwidth and/or mobile data.

However, if you're saying you can actually see a night and day difference between the two where the iPhone looks better in terms of video detail and resolution even though it's a 1080p screen. Then this comes down to a something fairly simple.

There is no such thing as a comparison between Android and iPhone.

Since iPhone is a device and Android is an operating system. iPhone uses iOS. Everything else uses Android.

And since, unlike crapple with their iPhones, every other device uses Android which is open source, product component quality differs. While there can be two phones both with let's say 6"1080p displays, one of them could be regular old LCD and the other one AMOLED. The AMOLED is going to looks miles better than the LCD simply because the display technology is of a higher level.

So saying things like iPhone vs Android phone is like saying Mac vs PC. Cuz unlike a Mac where the hardware is what it is and there is no diversity in it, a PC is something most any company out there can produce, and they vary in terms of what parts they put into the PC to make it better or not.
Obviously a $300 budget laptop PC isn't going to be on the same level as a $1500 Mac Book.

But I digress, to summarize, in what way are you saying the screen of the iPhone 7 Plus is better than this no named Android device when they are the same resolution and the Android device has a smaller screen and thusly a higher PPI density?

Are you just assuming it's better simply because you can choose to playback 1440p quality when using the YouTube app made for crapple's mobile operating system? Or because you can actually see a real difference when looking at each device while playing back the same video on YouTube?
 
Apple only makes the processor on the iPhone. All the rest of the components are purchased from suppliers just like for Android phones. The screens in particular (the AMOLED ones on newer iPhones) are made by Samsung. So they're using the same screens as on Samsung phones. Well, maybe not the exact same screens, but manufactured at the same plants using the same technology.

Video decoding is done in hardware. It's a common enough function that every GPU made in the last 10+ years has hardware video decoders built into them. Obviously the GPUs in older devices cannot handle newer video codecs (particularly h.265 and 10-bit). And many Android phone manufacturers only put in as much GPU as needed. So for example, if your phone only has a 1080p screen, then there's no point putting in a GPU capable of decoding 1440p.

Apple makes both the processor (CPU/GPU) and OS. So to simplify things for their OS developers, they tend to use the same processor in all their devices, relegating older processors to lower-end devices instead of designing new lower-end processors. One of the dubious side-benefits of this is that your Apple device may be capable of decoding video that it is physically incapable of displaying.

Most of the default Android video playback apps rely completely on the GPU's hardware video decode. I dunno about the YouTube app, but several third party video playback apps let you (attempt to) decode the video in software on the CPU if the GPU's hardware is incapable of decoding it in real-time. If it exceeds the CPU's capability, it'll show up as stuttering and dropouts.
 

LordVile

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I would advise you not to pay attention to screen res on phones unless you’re looking at a phablet or VR because anything that is “retina” will be equal in terms of sharpness to a 1440 or 4K screen. On the other devices if it’s “retina” the same applies but you’re looking at higher than 1080p on android screens for the same sharpness.
 

maneyrocks

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actually a guy claimed that his iphone is better than my 200$ android phone by saying that his iphone can play 1440p video, which grabbed my notice as my android has 1080p screen with 5inch screen has higher resolution than his iphone then howcome he has 1440p option. and also can we really percieve 2k resolution which iphone users boast of?
 

maneyrocks

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point is can we perceive 1440p resolution that iphone boasts about in phones?
 

maneyrocks

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the question is , is 1440 p video a gimmick in iphone? or it just has more framerate than an android,?
 

LordVile

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“point is can we perceive 1440p resolution that iphone boasts about in phones?”

What? On the majority of current phones you can’t percive the difference between 1080p and 1440p unless you’re pressing your nose to the screen
 
I'll say it again and to also clarify what otgers have said.

Just because this guy can choose to stream the youtube video in 1440p doesnt mean his display can actually display it. Since the iPhone display is still 1080p, you will only see those pixels and not the pixels of 1440p.

But, however, since you have a more budget 1080p phone and he has iPhone 7 plus, his display uses better screen and led technology to offer higher levels of brightness and better colors with richer blacks. But his phone can't actually display all of the pixels and detail of a 1440p video.

He clearly doesn't know that his phone is only a 1080p display and just thinks it's better because he has the option to stream a 1440p video but just cuz he can stream it, doesnt mean his phone can fully and truly display it.
 
In response to LordVile. Yes, you can see the difference between 1080p and 1440p on phones.

While it depends on the size of the phone, there is still a perceivable difference.

I used to have a 6" 1080p phone and it looked great, but when I switched up to a 6" 1440p phone,I cpuld see the difference. The smoothness and sharp clarity of edges and lines is definitely percievable.

With YouTube videos it depends on the video and whether or not the uploaded shot the content in raw, edited and exported raw, and uploaded in raw.
Or lossless.

Because if it was never encoded all the way until uploaded, then the only encoding that happens is from YouTube itself.

And with that, you can see the difference.
But for otger content that was encoded before upload, there's an initial loss of details and quality. And once uploaded, YouTube encodes it itself which makes it lose even more. And at thia point, theres not much of a percievable difference. It's still there, but it is ever so slight.
 

LordVile

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Simply.

It also depends on the panel itself nkt the resolution. A better quality panel at the same res would look better. An OLED will look better than an LCD. An IPS looks better than a TN. A properly calibrated panel looks better than one that the manufacturer didn’t bother working on etc.

When used at an appropriate distance there is no way to tell the difference between 1080p and 4K on a phone. You literally cannot see the difference as your eyes cannot distinguish individual pixels.
 

In practical terms, yes it's a gimmick. If the display is not capable of displaying 1440p, then all that'll happen is the 1440p video is downscaled to 1080p or whatever, making it visually identical or inferior to just streaming the 1080p version.

The only scenario where it could be useful is if the video is only available in 1440p, thus requiring the phone to decode the 1440p video in order to display it. But in real use, any source you can stream 1440p video from will also have 1080p and 720p versions available to stream. Making this scenario a practical impossibility. I suppose it could crop up if you had video files on your HTPC in 1440p and simply copied them to your phone.

Like I explained, this impractical "feature" is available on the iPhone due to the Apple's CPU design team only putting out a limited number of processors (they reuse older CPUs in lower end devices, instead of designing separate lower-end CPUs). The wider variety of CPUs and GPUs available for Android phones means designers can better match those components with the phone's display. Since the decode is done by dedicated video codec hardware in the GPU, it does not improve performance in any other way. (I suppose it could help if you used your phone to re-encode videos, which would probably take several days vs about 1 hour on a PC, and drain your battery in an hour or two).

It's kinda like your car having a speedometer showing a top speed of 180 MPH, when in reality the fastest the engine could push the car is 120 MPH. Yes if you found a huge downhill slope without any police and floored it while going down, the 120-180 MPH range of the speedometer might become useful. But in practical terms, it's a feature that you'll never use.
 

Colif

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since the Iphone 10 X & X Max have same resolution, just 1 has a bigger screen, I would suspect android phones now offer better screens, and can support any size screen based on how Android apps are written for a wider range of screens.

Iphones currently use LG or Samsung screens, and good chance Samsung doesn't give them better screens than what are on their own models. Screens are so good now its hard to tell which has a higher pixel count without using a magnifying lens

Apple likes to claim its leading field when most times it just takes an idea that already existed and makes it its own. There aren't many things it actually invented.
 

LordVile

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Do think that setting it to 1440 and having it downscaled is better than stretching a 1080 image to fit the weird aspect ratios of phones these days. Even if the display is 1080p down its more likely to have a 2160 horizontal pixel count than a 1920.
 

The 1440p and 1080p versions of the video that are streamed to you are high-quality versions compressed with a codec running on a powerful computer (usually for several hours per hour of video) to optimize the video quality taking into account detail and motion.

If your phone resizes that to fit a weird screen resolution, it's done using a simple, dumb bicubic or Lanczos resampling algorithm which ignores things like detail and motion, in order to resize the image as quickly as possible. It will be inferior to a properly converted native 1080p stream.

The vast majority of the time, the differences are going to be too minor for you to notice with your eye (nearly all "1080p" TV video is overscanned - resized to be slightly larger than the screen - so each image pixel does not map to a screen pixel when you're watching TV). But if you really care that much about the slight difference in image quality on a screen in between 1080p and 1440p resolution, the best option is to view the 1080p version at native resolution with black bars on all sides.

You know how when you run an older app in Windows 8/10, sometimes the fonts look blurry? That's the same thing. It's because they're being resized to match the screen scaling (usually 125%) using a bicubic or Lanczos algorithm which doesn't know how to make fonts look best. Newer apps allow Windows to manage the font scaling, so Windows can scale the fonts directly using high-quality vector original versions, resulting in a superior (non-blurry) image.
 

LordVile

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My point is most phones fill the screen and any version of downscaling will look better than upscaling.
 

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