How Likely Are Remote Car Hacks? Car Makers Respond

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dstarr3

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I still drive a 1996 Camry. I bought it for $1,900 cash on Craigslist in college. It's an old, ugly thing, and not very comfortable. Haven't bothered to replace it yet because the trade-in value is laughable and it still basically works and gets me 34mpg. And as much as I wish I had something more modern, sometimes I am quite glad that I still drive such an "analog" car.
 

southernshark

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A couple years ago, I wrote a mostly unsuccessful sci-fi book about security vehicles of the future. It was, and still is, my opinion that for high end security work, people will resort to 1960s technology. With quantum computing coming around the corner, a secure vehicle will be one with a 1960's diesel engine and drive train. Regular folk might feel comfortable in an auto-auto, but people who are at risk, will want a driver and an engine without chips.
 

bigdragon

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How likely are car hacks? Automakers say it's unlikely, customers are safe, and buy more of our cars! Researchers say hacks have happened, are happening, and will get worse. Predictable.

I applaud BMW and Mercedes for responding to this article. I do like the answer Mercedes gave. I'm not so convinced by BMW -- third party security validation is important. Hyundai should have found more technical people to respond. These smart or connected car capabilities concern me. I like my dumb car, but I hate driving. I want a car that can drive me to and from work while I entertain myself with my phone. I don't want that car refusing to start one day because of ransomware due to a lack of security features and planning.
 

razor512

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Consider that previous hacks of cars have shown that it is possible to take control of the lane assist system in order to turn the car left or right. ans hacks only get better over time, so imagine this, someone is driving on a dangerous road, and they are in the process of making a left turn and at a carefully chosen moment, an attacker engages the lane assist , and makes the car turn right.

No car company will admit to potential flaws, as that is bad for business, and there is no way for them to know in advanced which flaws the system has. No developer programs with the intention of leaving in security flaws. If the car can be remotely connected to, then it will eventually get exploited. The other concern is what happens to older model connected card when the companies no longer want to push out security updates?

Since just like all major operating systems, as much code as possible is reused, this is why new exploits today for windows 10, also work on windows XP. Imagine an exploit being discovered for a new car, and it works on older models, but only newer models receive the patch. Sadly this is the kind of future we are heading to.
 

SockPuppet

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It's not that hard, really. All you have to do is completely segregate the car's driving functions from the internet-connected entertainment package. There's 0 reason the actual driving function will need internet connectivity.
 

Stubbies

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Asking those in charge of the manufacture of said cars about the likelihood is just silliness. Why not ask Microsoft why people should be "upgrading" to Windows 10 and not sticking with 7 or 8.

Get an expert who doesn't work for the car companies and ask that person. That is advice you can count on way more than the people selling the product.
 

Slesreth

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And tom'sHardware becomes the worlds first tabloid'sHardware authority! Subjective speculation at its finest! Increase your blood pressure to its highest limits here!

Unless a 'hardware authority' that can not prove or disprove this with objective evidence that can be repeated, regardless of its safety or legality, like the Myth busters, this is just an 'old wives tail' in its tabloid stage.
 
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