How move Win10 and apps to new computer?

Imacflier

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I am building a mini-ITX system. My existing system is an I5-4670k on a Gigabyte Z97 MB. My new system will be an I5-4690k on a Gigabyte Z97 mITX motherboard.

If I simply clone my existing C: drive, can I 'cleanly' install the clone into my new system and have all work?

I know this is a question frequently asked before, but not from one MB chipset/manufacturer to the same MB chipset/manufacturer....or at least I did not find such.

Thanks in advance for your help.
Larry
 

USAFRet

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Yes, try the clone operation. It might work no prob.
Be prepared for if it does not work.

And yes...doing a full reinstall can be a pain. Last time I did with my main system, I forgot to document the specifics for one 3D CAD application. Serial num, login, password. Everything went great until I fired that one up for the first time. oops...
$1,000 CAD package (almost) down the tubes.
 

Imacflier

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I am not doubting you, but can you explain why that would be the case? Would it also be the case if I were using the SAME Motherboard and Processor?

Thanks for the explanation,

Larry

 

unclebun

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It can work. In fact, I was working on a home server this weekend that I cobbled together from old parts lying around. Got it all installed and it ran a day and then started crashing, and then wouldn't start. The old Biostar motherboard I'd used had some bulging caps near the memory slots. So I swapped in an old Asus motherboard that had the same socket, different model AMD chipset, and it all ran perfectly after a couple of reboots to set up drivers for everything.

That is not always the case, but if the two motherboards have the same chipset, that enhances the likelihood of success.
 

USAFRet

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A clone of a drive is no different than moving the original physical drive.

There are 3 possible outcomes with doing this:
1. It boots up and "just works"
2. It fails horribly
3. It boots up, but you find lingering issues later.

The closer the two systems are, the better chance of it working. But zero guarantees.
Anyone who states it always works simply has not done it enough times to see the outcomes.

Prepare for a full install on the new hardware.
Changing hardware like this, a full install is always recommended, sometimes required.

Also, what OS is this?
If Win 10: Read and do this before you change any parts:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3164428/windows-build-1607-activation.html
 

Imacflier

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I am using Win10 Pro.
Would my likelihood of success increase if I use SYSPREP to prepare the image?
Larry

 

USAFRet

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A simple reinstall in the new hardware is almost certainly easier and faster than managing sysprep.
 

Imacflier

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Not so simple when including the apps which require license transferring and redownloading.

Even so, you are probably correct. It sounds like the best course is to clone and let it rip....if it works I am done...if it does not or is unstable, THEN do a clean install!

Larry

 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Yes, try the clone operation. It might work no prob.
Be prepared for if it does not work.

And yes...doing a full reinstall can be a pain. Last time I did with my main system, I forgot to document the specifics for one 3D CAD application. Serial num, login, password. Everything went great until I fired that one up for the first time. oops...
$1,000 CAD package (almost) down the tubes.
 

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