Question How much room does my GPU need?

May 11, 2019
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I am considering an upgrade for my prebuilt PC's GPU, and I have sorted out almost every problem up to this point. The last issue I have is that I don't know if there is enough room between the fans on the card, and the PSU. In the image attached, you can see my current GPU, and the power supply on the fan side of the GPU. I measured the distance between the PCB and the PSU and it was about 47mm. Is that enough? The card I'm considering is a Radeon RX 570, which is dual slot.
Image
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
a dual slot card is 38MM +/- 1mm
that card will leave 9mm or so for airflow which is not ideal, however this is a moot discussion that PSU will not power the rx 570, the rx 570 can eat almost 200W when under stress and that PSU is only 180W MAX. IDK if that PSU even has the AUX power ports the 570 will require.
what is the model of your computer and what are your screen specs (resolution and refresh rate)?
 
May 11, 2019
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a dual slot card is 38MM +/- 1mm
that card will leave 9mm or so for airflow which is not ideal, however this is a moot discussion that PSU will not power the rx 570, the rx 570 can eat almost 200W when under stress and that PSU is only 180W MAX. IDK if that PSU even has the AUX power ports the 570 will require.
what is the model of your computer and what are your screen specs (resolution and refresh rate)?
I forgot to mention that I will be upgradung the PSU to a 450W. The computer is an HP Pavilion 570-P017C. My monitor is 23" 1080p 60Hz.
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
around 9mm so not ideal as I said. less than 1cm.
that PSU will not like that case, it will mount with the fan facing the top of the case, I cannot find a vent in the top panel, so no exhaust.
it looks like that case will need a PSU that is vented back to front, like the unit inside the case now. the top and bottom of the PSU are solid and the front and rear are vented.

is a new case out of the budget? even if you change the case, the rear I/O port will be missing due to the proprietary nature of the motherboard, the front panel wiring will need some custom work that may not jibe with the standard case plugs. these systems are made to be difficult to upgrade.
sorry to be the naysayer.
 
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May 11, 2019
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around 9mm so not ideal as I said. less than 1cm.
that PSU will not like that case, it will mount with the fan facing the tip of the case, I cannot find a vent in the top panel, so no exhaust.
it looks like that case will need a PSU that is vented back to front, like the unit inside the case now. the top and bottom of the PSU are solid and the front and rear are vented.

is a new case out of the budget?
sorry to be the naysayer.
That was my next decision to make. I could likely squeeze a new case into the budget, although I was hoping not to. I would also have to check that the front IO, mounting points, power switch etc. would work in the new case, however it was my understanding that most of these things were somewhat standardized, even in prebuilts.
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
replacing the case is easy enough the front panel connections on the new case are seperate, replacing the motherboard is what takes some custom work, sorry for confusion, the OEM case has a single block for all the connections and that would need to be separated to work with a new motherboard.
the rear I/O shield though will be missing in the new case. it appears to be part of the old case and cannot migrate. not a big deal though just be more cautious when plugging things in.
pre-built covers a lot of ground. OEMS like Dell and HP get non standard parts made to order, cases, power supplies and even some motherboards are not standard.
then there are boutique shops that all use standard parts.
 
May 11, 2019
29
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30
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replacing the case is easy enough the front panel connections on the new case are seperate, replacing the motherboard is what takes some custom work, sorry for confusion, the OEM case has a single block for all the connections and that would need to be separated to work with a new motherboard.
the rear I/O shield though will be missing in the new case. it appears to be part of the old case and cannot migrate. not a big deal though just be more cautious when plugging things in.
pre-built covers a lot of ground. OEMS like Dell and HP get non standard parts made to order, cases, power supplies and even some motherboards are not standard.
then there are boutique shops that all use standard parts.
what are you referring to when you say "the OEM case has a single block for all the connections and that would need to be separated to work with a new motherboard." Which connections are you referring to?
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
power switch, reset switch, power leds, hdd leds.
in the case you have they are all in one block that plugs into the motherboard, the new case each switch and led will have a small block all its own.
replacing a motherboard in an OEM case usually means breaking the block into its smaller pieces or making an adapter.
 

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