[SOLVED] How much time does it take for BIOS settings to be reseted after I take out the CMOS battery?

Jan 5, 2021
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I am a lazy person and I don't want to lose my BIOS settings. I want to learn how much time does the BIOS settings stand without a CMOS battery. Will they be reseted if I change the battery fast enough?
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
I am a lazy person and I don't want to lose my BIOS settings. I want to learn how much time does the BIOS settings stand without a CMOS battery. Will they be reseted if I change the battery fast enough?
Depends on the motherboard, some require you to jump the CMOS pins to clear, others the battery removal can do it. Just do it quickly but not carelessly by dropping the new or old and turn off the computer first (believe it or not some do it running which is crazy).
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
I am a lazy person and I don't want to lose my BIOS settings. I want to learn how much time does the BIOS settings stand without a CMOS battery. Will they be reseted if I change the battery fast enough?
Depends on the motherboard, some require you to jump the CMOS pins to clear, others the battery removal can do it. Just do it quickly but not carelessly by dropping the new or old and turn off the computer first (believe it or not some do it running which is crazy).
 
I am a lazy person and I don't want to lose my BIOS settings. I want to learn how much time does the BIOS settings stand without a CMOS battery. Will they be reseted if I change the battery fast enough?
The purpose of a CMOS reset is quite precisely to reset the BIOS settings to safe ones, especially those you may not be able to change yourself. So it's illogical to do what you're trying to do.

Instead look in your BIOS for a 'save overclocking profiles' section, most have one. Save a profile and then reload it after the CMOS reset.
 
Jan 5, 2021
6
0
10
0
Depends on the motherboard, some require you to jump the CMOS pins to clear, others the battery removal can do it. Just do it quickly but not carelessly by dropping the new or old and turn off the computer first (believe it or not some do it running which is crazy).
Cut the electrical connection to the pc, replaced the battery under 30 seconds. BIOS settings are still the same, just as I wanted :) Thank you.
 
Jan 5, 2021
6
0
10
0
The purpose of a CMOS reset is quite precisely to reset the BIOS settings to safe ones, especially those you may not be able to change yourself. So it's illogical to do what you're trying to do.

Instead look in your BIOS for a 'save overclocking profiles' section, most have one. Save a profile and then reload it after the CMOS reset.
My CMOS battery has died and I wanted to replace it while keeping my BIOS settings. I actually did it and everything is OK now.
 
My CMOS battery has died and I wanted to replace it while keeping my BIOS settings. I actually did it and everything is OK now.
Hmm...I'd have to say that's not really a good way to do it. Reason is there are a lot of settings with many you don't have access to change in the user screens. Even in that 30 second time frame a few may have 'flipped', but not all. If your system's operating OK for you then no need to worry, but should it start behaving strangely a CMOS reset might be the fix.

What I'm really curious about though is how you determined your CMOS battery died since, after all, the indication it's died is your board loses it's settings when the system is powered down.
 
Jan 5, 2021
6
0
10
0
Hmm...I'd have to say that's not really a good way to do it. Reason is there are a lot of settings with many you don't have access to change in the user screens. Even in that 30 second time frame a few may have 'flipped', but not all. If your system's operating OK for you then no need to worry, but should it start behaving strangely a CMOS reset might be the fix.

What I'm really curious about though is how you determined your CMOS battery died since, after all, the indication it's died is your board loses it's settings when the system is powered down.
My PC is operating so good. I have no issues at all. My CMOS battery didn't actually "die". My PC sometimes didn't boot, sometimes booted with "CMOS checksum error" POST error and sometimes booted with a wrong date/time. I tried everything to solve these problems and realized these issues are pretty normal since I bought this motherboard 7 years ago. Basically replaced my old CR2032 with a new one and all problems are solved. My BIOS settings are the same, though.
 

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