Question how speedy and how much RAM for a new build

Mar 19, 2021
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I've decided on the CPU and motherboard but am fatigued after researching what RAM to choose. For a new build, I'm
going with the AMD Ryzen 7 5700G CPU and the MSI MAG B550 Tomahawk. I'll be using the CPU's built-in graphics
instead of buying a discrete graphics card. I do not intend to overclock the CPU or the RAM. My pc will be used for email,
surfing, watching say YouTube videos (but not creating or editing video) (hopefully 4K), playing older RPG games (ca. 2000) and toying
around with a VM or two.

In general, I want to buy 16GB RAM (2 x 8GB sized modules) with a speed between 4000 and 4600 (arbitrary # on my part). Articles I've read agree that WRT RAM, the faster the better, lower latency is better and that if the speed is the same for specific RAM products, then lower latency is better. Better meaning faster speeds. MSI recommends using RAM that draws 1.35V or less to protect the CPU.

MSI publishes a RAM compatibility list which at the moment has over 1,400 entries. Three columns are labeled SPD speed, RAM speed and Supported Speed. After combing through descriptions of multiple RAM products, I can only conclude that I am still lost.

Which one of these fields are the most important to identify which product to research more in depth?

Has anyone published a cross-index between the RAM model numbers in the MSI compatibility list with the model name the vendor uses to sell the product?

From the same list, voltage generally increases as the RAM speed increases. Given MSI's warning about voltage, should I limit the upper speed range (4600) of the RAM I'm looking for? Does that voltage assume that you are overclocking the RAM? How serious will a 1.5V RAM affect the performance of the computer and how do such effects show themselves? I mean, if I bought RAM listed at 1.5V, will I have computer problems immediately or would it take several years before problems cropped up?

ISTR that integrated graphics share the computer's RAM. I don't recall seeing any guideline about how much RAM one should devote when using a CPU with integrated graphics. Does anyone know? Right now, I was thinking 16GB of RAM would be fine, but now that I think about the RAM "sharing", I'm starting to get worried if 16GB will be enough?

Thanks.
 
I've decided on the CPU and motherboard but am fatigued after researching what RAM to choose. For a new build, I'm
going with the AMD Ryzen 7 5700G CPU and the MSI MAG B550 Tomahawk. I'll be using the CPU's built-in graphics
instead of buying a discrete graphics card. I do not intend to overclock the CPU or the RAM. My pc will be used for email,
surfing, watching say YouTube videos (but not creating or editing video) (hopefully 4K), playing older RPG games (ca. 2000) and toying
around with a VM or two.

In general, I want to buy 16GB RAM (2 x 8GB sized modules) with a speed between 4000 and 4600 (arbitrary # on my part). Articles I've read agree that WRT RAM, the faster the better, lower latency is better and that if the speed is the same for specific RAM products, then lower latency is better. Better meaning faster speeds. MSI recommends using RAM that draws 1.35V or less to protect the CPU.

MSI publishes a RAM compatibility list which at the moment has over 1,400 entries. Three columns are labeled SPD speed, RAM speed and Supported Speed. After combing through descriptions of multiple RAM products, I can only conclude that I am still lost.

Which one of these fields are the most important to identify which product to research more in depth?

Has anyone published a cross-index between the RAM model numbers in the MSI compatibility list with the model name the vendor uses to sell the product?

From the same list, voltage generally increases as the RAM speed increases. Given MSI's warning about voltage, should I limit the upper speed range (4600) of the RAM I'm looking for? Does that voltage assume that you are overclocking the RAM? How serious will a 1.5V RAM affect the performance of the computer and how do such effects show themselves? I mean, if I bought RAM listed at 1.5V, will I have computer problems immediately or would it take several years before problems cropped up?

ISTR that integrated graphics share the computer's RAM. I don't recall seeing any guideline about how much RAM one should devote when using a CPU with integrated graphics. Does anyone know? Right now, I was thinking 16GB of RAM would be fine, but now that I think about the RAM "sharing", I'm starting to get worried if 16GB will be enough?

Thanks.
if you could afford, ram speeds between 3600mhz to 4133mhz works the best, also aim for lower CL, cause it could increase the read write copy performance.
 

Bob.B

Respectable
Feb 8, 2021
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I've decided on the CPU and motherboard but am fatigued after researching what RAM to choose. For a new build, I'm
going with the AMD Ryzen 7 5700G CPU and the MSI MAG B550 Tomahawk. I'll be using the CPU's built-in graphics
instead of buying a discrete graphics card. I do not intend to overclock the CPU or the RAM. My pc will be used for email,
surfing, watching say YouTube videos (but not creating or editing video) (hopefully 4K), playing older RPG games (ca. 2000) and toying
around with a VM or two.

In general, I want to buy 16GB RAM (2 x 8GB sized modules) with a speed between 4000 and 4600 (arbitrary # on my part). Articles I've read agree that WRT RAM, the faster the better, lower latency is better and that if the speed is the same for specific RAM products, then lower latency is better. Better meaning faster speeds. MSI recommends using RAM that draws 1.35V or less to protect the CPU.

MSI publishes a RAM compatibility list which at the moment has over 1,400 entries. Three columns are labeled SPD speed, RAM speed and Supported Speed. After combing through descriptions of multiple RAM products, I can only conclude that I am still lost.

Which one of these fields are the most important to identify which product to research more in depth?

Has anyone published a cross-index between the RAM model numbers in the MSI compatibility list with the model name the vendor uses to sell the product?

From the same list, voltage generally increases as the RAM speed increases. Given MSI's warning about voltage, should I limit the upper speed range (4600) of the RAM I'm looking for? Does that voltage assume that you are overclocking the RAM? How serious will a 1.5V RAM affect the performance of the computer and how do such effects show themselves? I mean, if I bought RAM listed at 1.5V, will I have computer problems immediately or would it take several years before problems cropped up?

ISTR that integrated graphics share the computer's RAM. I don't recall seeing any guideline about how much RAM one should devote when using a CPU with integrated graphics. Does anyone know? Right now, I was thinking 16GB of RAM would be fine, but now that I think about the RAM "sharing", I'm starting to get worried if 16GB will be enough?

Thanks.
From what I have read with ryzen 3600 seems to be the peak above that is diminishing returns.
3600@cl16 should work fine.
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
APUs are different. The Fclock can usually be run at over 2000 Mhz speed, as far as I know. When some motherboards list topspeeds in their PR material, it is done on an APU. 5300 Mhz RAM for example.
https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/MEG-X570S-UNIFY-X-MAX#support-main-block-qvl Click on RX 5X00G/GE. Topspeed achieved 5333 Mhz. 200 Mhz higher than on a Vermeer (5000 without G).
APUs are great RAM overclockers.
Dram voltage wont do any damage to your CPU. SOC voltage can. If the RAM packager sells RAM at a certain voltage and leaves a warranty, they are not kidding. 1.45v-1.5v, you can run that voltage on most RAM ICs, daily. With no additional cooling.

When it comes to capacity, that depends on what VMs and how many you plan to run, and at the same time. Only you know the answer.
How much RAM the CPUs built-in graphics use, I don't know, Maybe this review mentions it. https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-7-5700g-review
Either way, the faster the RAM, the better, since it is shared with the APU. Review mentions Fclock between 2000-2400 Mhz. You wont know until you have the APU in your system and start testing what your max speed for Fclock is. This would mean RAM at 4000-4800 Mhz can be used in a 1:1 ratio, the much preferred ratio. You don't really want to deviate from the ratio, performance will tank.

Example from MSI QVL: Kingston HX453C20PB3K2/16 @ 5333 Mhz. The shop you buy RAM from should list the HX-part. If they don't, ask them or shop elsewhere. It's not like it is some secret to hide.
 
Here is the G.Skill RAM Configurator for your motherboard:

https://www.gskill.com/configurator?page=1&cls=1529635169&manufacturer=1524715120&chipset=1603934649&model=1603937790

These are the memory kits that have been validated with your moherboard to run at full speed, granted you have a capable CPU.

Latest generation Ryzen CPUs are limited to DDR4-4000 for 1:1 IF ratio, so that is the highest you need to consider. As you can see with the list, DDR4-3800 is actually the highest G.Skill has tested the motherboard to be capable of. A BIOS update may support higher, so you can consider a DDR4-4000 CL14 or CL16 kit, but any higher is likely not beneficial for the system.

Pick from the list and you can expect easy set up and maximum results.
 
Mar 19, 2021
20
0
10
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APUs are different. The Fclock can usually be run at over 2000 Mhz speed, as far as I know. When some motherboards list topspeeds in their PR material, it is done on an APU. 5300 Mhz RAM for example.
https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/MEG-X570S-UNIFY-X-MAX#support-main-block-qvl Click on RX 5X00G/GE. Topspeed achieved 5333 Mhz. 200 Mhz higher than on a Vermeer (5000 without G).
APUs are great RAM overclockers.
Dram voltage wont do any damage to your CPU. SOC voltage can. If the RAM packager sells RAM at a certain voltage and leaves a warranty, they are not kidding. 1.45v-1.5v, you can run that voltage on most RAM ICs, daily. With no additional cooling.

When it comes to capacity, that depends on what VMs and how many you plan to run, and at the same time. Only you know the answer.
How much RAM the CPUs built-in graphics use, I don't know, Maybe this review mentions it. https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-7-5700g-review
Either way, the faster the RAM, the better, since it is shared with the APU. Review mentions Fclock between 2000-2400 Mhz. You wont know until you have the APU in your system and start testing what your max speed for Fclock is. This would mean RAM at 4000-4800 Mhz can be used in a 1:1 ratio, the much preferred ratio. You don't really want to deviate from the ratio, performance will tank.

Example from MSI QVL: Kingston HX453C20PB3K2/16 @ 5333 Mhz. The shop you buy RAM from should list the HX-part. If they don't, ask them or shop elsewhere. It's not like it is some secret to hide.
I re-read the THG article three times now, but didn't see anything about the shared memory. However, their test config used 2x 8GB RAM modules at 3600 and did not mention any performance hit per se, so for my purposes I will assume my question is trivial. As to VM, I only run one at a time, and I play around with them out of curiosity and to sometimes run a Linux or Android version to see what it looks like. The list of RAM products I found was from the same configurator you mentioned although specific to MSI's Tomahawk mobo. Sure were a lot of entries. I dumped them into a spreadsheet to help me, still so many it is a bit overwhelming.
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
I re-read the THG article three times now, but didn't see anything about the shared memory. However, their test config used 2x 8GB RAM modules at 3600 and did not mention any performance hit per se, so for my purposes I will assume my question is trivial. As to VM, I only run one at a time, and I play around with them out of curiosity and to sometimes run a Linux or Android version to see what it looks like. The list of RAM products I found was from the same configurator you mentioned although specific to MSI's Tomahawk mobo. Sure were a lot of entries. I dumped them into a spreadsheet to help me, still so many it is a bit overwhelming.
https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/amd-ryzen-7-5700g.285015/post-4576213
Post by Bsim500.
It appears you can choose how much RAM the APU uses in BIOS but it will use whatever is needed either way.

Games from 2000 you say? Year 2000, GPUs had around 32 megs of VRAM. So that shouldn't be an issue. But you might have to emulate Win2000/XP. Should still be fine with around 1 gig RAM for the VM.
 
Mar 19, 2021
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https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/amd-ryzen-7-5700g.285015/post-4576213
Post by Bsim500.
It appears you can choose how much RAM the APU uses in BIOS but it will use whatever is needed either way.

Games from 2000 you say? Year 2000, GPUs had around 32 megs of VRAM. So that shouldn't be an issue. But you might have to emulate Win2000/XP. Should still be fine with around 1 gig RAM for the VM.
Thanks. It reminds me of the settings when creating a VM. I'm not sure how much effort will be involved with the games. Right now, most of the games I've got run out of the box on Windows 8.1. The older ones use DosBox. I built my existing pc in 2012 or so. Still works fine, but not adequate to watch 2K or 4K videos. It has an Athlon II X3 440 CPU and a PowerColor HD Radeon 6750.
 

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