Question How to achieve better cooling on my PC ?

Sep 4, 2021
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Hello! This is my first post here, so I apologize if I may do something wrong.
I am having very high temperatures playing games like Battlefield 1, Doom Eternal and Battlefield 5. Temps get around 85 to 90 celsius.

I have changed from a 360 AIO Coolermaster Master Liquid ML360P to an Air Cooler Aorus AT800, then finally to a Noctua NH-D15 Chromax.Black, and still have the same temp issues.
I know this intel is pretty beefy hot, but I do believe this is too much during gaming.

I don't have any OC (I don't even know how to do it, yeah, noob here...), and I just want to cool down my temps during game.
I live in a hot city with temps around 31-34 Celsius (sometimes more)

Here are my specs:

Z390 Aorus Master with F11N BIOS
I9 9900KS ,
EVGA RTX 3080TI FTW
Hyper X Fury
DDR4 64Gb ram,

All drivers are up to date.

My case is a Lian Li Lancool II Mesh RGB with 3 120mm front pushing, one rear 120mm Corsair fan pulling, 2x 120mm Corsair under the gpu pushing, 2x140mm corsair on top exhausting. Noctua cooler is well tight and thermal paste was pea sized drop in the middle.

I really really appreciate if someone has the patience to help me solving this, maybe with a correct bios setting, as this is driving me crazy, and I don't know what to do.
Thank you in advance.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Has the computer always had high temperatures or did you start swapping coolers etc. when/because the temperatures increased?

How old is the computer? Has the thermal paste ever been replaced?

Take a closer look the case and fans - especially with respect to air flows and fan placement. The fans could be "fighting" each other to the extent where cooling air flows are actually impeded.

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Disk drives: make, model, capacity, how full?

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.
 
Not to worry.
You are likely OK.

Cooling starts with ambient temperature.
31-34c. is quite hot to start with.

The processor will monitor it's own temperature and will slow down or shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.

You need do nothing.
If you want to do a bit better, replace the front 120mm intake fans with higher rpm versions. (I would not bother)

As an experiment, slow down or turn off the top exhaust fans.
The theory is that such strong fans will redirect the intake cooling airstream up and out of the case, bypassing the cpu cooler and the graphics card.
 
Sep 4, 2021
5
0
10
0
Has the computer always had high temperatures or did you start swapping coolers etc. when/because the temperatures increased?

How old is the computer? Has the thermal paste ever been replaced?

Take a closer look the case and fans - especially with respect to air flows and fan placement. The fans could be "fighting" each other to the extent where cooling air flows are actually impeded.

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Disk drives: make, model, capacity, how full?

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.
Hi, thanks for replying!
My computer is 2 years old. The thermal paste was replaced (like 3 times last month because of changing coolers)

I noticed the temp increase after replacing my 2080TI to my new 3080TI VGA. This is about 2 months ago.

PSU is a corsair RM1000X, bought along with all other things back at 2019.

I got one Western Digital NVME 1Tb, one 2T Seagate Barracuda Hard Drive with 800Mb files on it, two 250Gb samsung Evo SSD (one is almost full), and a 480Gb Samsung Evo SSD.

Everything is cleaned from dust and debris.
 
Sep 4, 2021
5
0
10
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Not to worry.
You are likely OK.

Cooling starts with ambient temperature.
31-34c. is quite hot to start with.

The processor will monitor it's own temperature and will slow down or shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.

You need do nothing.
If you want to do a bit better, replace the front 120mm intake fans with higher rpm versions. (I would not bother)

As an experiment, slow down or turn off the top exhaust fans.
The theory is that such strong fans will redirect the intake cooling airstream up and out of the case, bypassing the cpu cooler and the graphics card.
Hi, how are you doing?
I know this cpu runs hot, but going from 85 to 90 (95 once) during a Battlefield game is pretty concerning. If I turn the air conditioner on, it runs at around 75 to 78 Celsius.

About the exhaust fans, I will try this out and see what happens. I will answer you back here.

Thing is, I tried a lot of bios settings like MCE disabled, AVX offset from auto to 2, Turbo off, and nothing has changed. And I must confess I am not an expert on doing such things. Actually pretty dumb =)
 
9900K is a hot chip under full load.
That is to be expected.
Peaks of 90c. are not particularly worrisome.
Run HWmonitor or such and look at your cpu temperatures.
If you see a max of 100c. you likely throttled.

Sometimes in the bios, you get an option to "load optimized defaults"
That may actually be overclocking your processor inadvertently.
 
Sep 4, 2021
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9900K is a hot chip under full load.
That is to be expected.
Peaks of 90c. are not particularly worrisome.
Run HWmonitor or such and look at your cpu temperatures.
If you see a max of 100c. you likely throttled.

Sometimes in the bios, you get an option to "load optimized defaults"
That may actually be overclocking your processor inadvertently.
Hi there.
It never reached 100c. The closest to that was during a Battlefield V session that it reached 95c
I tried the load optimized defaults, but the results were the same in temps.
Maybe a failing motherboard?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Yup, what you're up against here is just physics. You've done well to pay attention to what's going on with your temperatures and you've made every effort to reduce temperatures by simple means. But it just comes down to the fact that this is a very hot, very aggressively configured CPU in a very hot environment, and you're coming into contact with the science of cooling. Maxing out a similar CPU in my home office, I'd expect it to be somewhere in the low 70s, but my basement is fairly chilly year-round (obviously in the winter and the A/C inevitably dumps a lot of heat down here no matter how many registers I close) at about 17-18 degrees C. But I'm starting with a 15 degree "head start" on you, so your numbers make sense.

We usually tell people to worry about low 90s not because low 90s is inherently dangerous, but that 99 times out of 100, it's because someone has screwed up or is doing something wrong. You're that hundreth person; you've done just about what you can do without going to a custom loop. Which is cool and fun if you're into that, but also a royal pain (and certainly not free). So you have to decide whether to live with the temperatures, go custom, or underclock your CPU somewhat. I think you're at your limit at how much pushing more air at it will help; you might chop off a few more degrees with higher pressure static fans on the radiator in push pull, but it's going to be a lot of work for a small benefit. As long as you're careful to make sure those temperatures in the 90s don't become throttling temperatures, "watchful waiting" is likely your best bet here.
 
Reactions: Alex J.
Sep 4, 2021
5
0
10
0
Yup, what you're up against here is just physics. You've done well to pay attention to what's going on with your temperatures and you've made every effort to reduce temperatures by simple means. But it just comes down to the fact that this is a very hot, very aggressively configured CPU in a very hot environment, and you're coming into contact with the science of cooling. Maxing out a similar CPU in my home office, I'd expect it to be somewhere in the low 70s, but my basement is fairly chilly year-round (obviously in the winter and the A/C inevitably dumps a lot of heat down here no matter how many registers I close) at about 17-18 degrees C. But I'm starting with a 15 degree "head start" on you, so your numbers make sense.

We usually tell people to worry about low 90s not because low 90s is inherently dangerous, but that 99 times out of 100, it's because someone has screwed up or is doing something wrong. You're that hundreth person; you've done just about what you can do without going to a custom loop. Which is cool and fun if you're into that, but also a royal pain (and certainly not free). So you have to decide whether to live with the temperatures, go custom, or underclock your CPU somewhat. I think you're at your limit at how much pushing more air at it will help; you might chop off a few more degrees with higher pressure static fans on the radiator in push pull, but it's going to be a lot of work for a small benefit. As long as you're careful to make sure those temperatures in the 90s don't become throttling temperatures, "watchful waiting" is likely your best bet here.
Hello, thx for your attention.
I really would like to know how I could undervolt this cpu, but I humbly say that I don't know what to do such thing. Tried do search for videos and stuff, and I only find videos about OC.
Indeed where I live, Manaus, Amazon, Brazil is really hot almost the entire year. And this is such a factor to consider too. I agree with that.
I am planning to upgrade to AMD next year. Maybe i can get better results with a Ryzen.
 
In windows power management, try capping the maximum cpu usage to 95%.
See what happens; I doubt you would notice any performance impact.

Next year, there will be new processors from both intel and amd.
They will likely have improved performance and efficiencies.
 
Reactions: Alex J.

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