Question How to check the correct current rating for a power cord?

Jun 21, 2022
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So I recently purchased a laptop from US and it came with a 10A 125V power cord as expected. I actually live in India so I purchased a power cord which could support the Indian wall socket(240V) as compared to the 110V in US. I bought the power cord off a local hardware store but, the issue is that on the connector end of the cord, it is mentioned that the cord supports 10A 250V while on the plug end which attaches to the supply, it is written 6A 250V. Now, since I bought the cable offf from my local hardware shop, it came with a simple packing with not too many details. How do I correctly determine what is the actual ampere rating of the power cord?
 
I bought the power cord off a local hardware store but, the issue is that on the connector end of the cord, it is mentioned that the cord supports 10A 250V while on the plug end which attaches to the supply, it is written 6A 250V. Now, since I bought the cable offf from my local hardware shop, it came with a simple packing with not too many details. How do I correctly determine what is the actual ampere rating of the power cord?
It's OK to use the cord you bought from your local shop.

6A * 250V equals 1.500W, no way your laptop would consume that amount of electrical power. You can see the details at the bottom of your laptop's AC adapter, normally you should see something like 19V, 3.4A, 65W....
 
Jun 21, 2022
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It's OK to use the cord you bought from your local shop.

6A * 250V equals 1.500W, no way your laptop would consume that amount of electrical power. You can see the details at the bottom of your laptop's AC adapter, normally you should see something like 19V, 3.4A, 65W....
The AC adapter or famously known as power brick is rated to take input from wall supply as follows:
Voltage: 100-240V
Current: ~4.5 A
Power: 300W
The power cord I got was a 10A 125V
I was only concerned became 4.5 A is quite close to 6A and heating might become an issue.
The hardware store guy gave me a cord on which the connector end it is written 10A 250v but on the wall socket plug it is written 6A 250V which got me confused as to is the power cord rated for 6 Amperage or 10 Amperage. The store guy just gave me the cord no box nothing.
 
Mar 29, 2022
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There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the correct way to check the current rating for a power cord will vary depending on the type of power cord being checked and the type of electricity being used. However, some tips that may be helpful include:

1. Check the power cord's label - Most power cords come with labels that list the cord's current rating and other important information.

2. Try a power cord tester - Some power cords come with built-in testers that allow you to check the cord's current rating.

3. Use an online tool - Many online tools allow you to check the current rating of a power cord. Simply enter the cord's name and current rating into the tool, and you will be able to get an accurate result.

4. Use a voltmeter to measure voltage - If you're unable to find any information about a power cord on its label or in online tools, you can try measuring its voltage using a voltmeter. This will help you determine the cord's current rating.

Hopefully, these tips will help you check the correct current rating for a power cord.
 
Jun 21, 2022
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when you rise voltage, amperage will drop
6A on 110V is same as 3A on 220V
So if I'm not wrong then is a laptop charger only concerned about the amount of power it takes and not about the voltage and current ratings individually. To give an example if I charge my laptop in US(110V) will the AC adapter demand more current out of the power cord as compared to if I charge my laptop in India (220V)? Please correct me if I'm wrong or let me know if you did not understand the question?
 
So if I'm not wrong then is a laptop charger only concerned about the amount of power it takes and not about the voltage and current ratings individually. To give an example if I charge my laptop in US(110V) will the AC adapter demand more current out of the power cord as compared to if I charge my laptop in India (220V)? Please correct me if I'm wrong or let me know if you did not understand the question?
Yes you lower the voltage the amperes go up to get the same power to the charger. Watt = ampere x volts
 
Jun 21, 2022
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Hello guys sorry to bother you again but actually I have a universal socket at my home which I was not even aware of. The power cord which came with the laptop can easily be inserted into that socket. My only concern is that on the power cord the ratings are written as 10 A 125V while the power supply at my house is 230V. So, will the power cord be able to handle the 230V. Some people told me that companies selling laptops do keep in mind the different power supplies and the capacity of that wire is actually 300V but, on the cord they write the voltage for the power supply from where it was purchased (110V for US). After checking on the cord it is written 300V insulation. To conclude, can I go on with the US power cord or should I use a power cord especially for Indian supply?
 
Jun 21, 2022
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voltage doesnt matter, ampers do, more ampers there, bigger cord needed
lower voltage = larger wire gauge needed
The cord can support 10A which is more than enough for what the power brick requires for charging (4.5A). I was just concerned that the power cord has a rating written of 125V then will it be able to handle 230V of wall power supply
 
The cord can support 10A which is more than enough for what the power brick requires for charging (4.5A). I was just concerned that the power cord has a rating written of 125V then will it be able to handle 230V of wall power supply
well if cable is rated for 10A at 115V, then at 230V that cable can handle 5A which is same wattage...well technically at 230V amperage (power draw) will be slightly lower as copper wont heat that much (lower amperage) thus lower power loss
 
Hello guys sorry to bother you again but actually I have a universal socket at my home which I was not even aware of. The power cord which came with the laptop can easily be inserted into that socket. My only concern is that on the power cord the ratings are written as 10 A 125V while the power supply at my house is 230V. So, will the power cord be able to handle the 230V. Some people told me that companies selling laptops do keep in mind the different power supplies and the capacity of that wire is actually 300V but, on the cord they write the voltage for the power supply from where it was purchased (110V for US). After checking on the cord it is written 300V insulation. To conclude, can I go on with the US power cord or should I use a power cord especially for Indian supply?
US cord is fine. I travel world wide for work and always have a laptop with me using my power cord on all Continents
 

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