[SOLVED] How to configure 2nd router to setup a separate network using same Internet source

Apr 10, 2020
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I have a two story house. The router is on second floor, the cable modem is on main floor. Both of these were provided by Spectrum. The internet Ethernet connection from the cable modem goes to a switch first, then multiple ethernet cables flow to various rooms from the switch. Now I want to setup a second wifi network on the main floor since the signal is not very good and I have many devices like Firesticks, TV, and phones connected on main floor. The reason the main router is on the 2nd floor is I need dedicated LAN access to two computers that are used for working from home office. So in essence I want to create a second network using the internet Ethernet cable outlet I have on the main floor. But I don't want the 2.4 GHz and 5 Ghz signals to interfere as well as I think IP of 2nd router will need to change. I don't want to setup a wifi repeater or extender, rather a separate network. Is this possible?
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
While I think I understand why you have it this way (speed) it isn't really helping you. Although I only have a rough idea of your network setup, it sounds like you are not using your current setup to its full potential. So try this, keeping in mind that I only have a rough idea of your setup:
  1. Bring the router (wireless, I hope) downstairs and plug it into the modem
  2. Use the router to control devices downstairs.
  3. If you need more than 3 ports, use the forth for an inexpensive switch.
  4. Run the 4th port on the router (or port from the switch) to run to your switch upstairs.
  5. If you need wireless upstarts, just buy another wireless router, and turn off the router function, so that is it only a wireless switch to extend your range (and not lose speed).
 
Something is not correct or I completely misunderstand.

The cables must go modem---router---switch--devices. You only get a single IP address from the modem. The purpose of the router is to share this ip address. If you connect a switch to the modem only 1 devices will get a IP address.

If what you call a modem is a modem/router then you can connect a switch to it but then I don't understand how your other router fits into the picture.

In any case you do not want to run a seperate network really. It makes sharing of files and printers etc extremely hard. You want to run the new router as a AP. You will always get some interference from the wifi radios unless you set the channel widths to 20mhz. You would then set the channels to not overlap. Setting it to 20mhz though will cut the maximum speeds significantly so you maybe better off leaving them interfere. On the 5g band you still can set the channels to not interfere unless of course you have wifi6 which uses all the channels.
 
Apr 10, 2020
3
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10
0
Something is not correct or I completely misunderstand.

The cables must go modem---router---switch--devices. You only get a single IP address from the modem. The purpose of the router is to share this ip address. If you connect a switch to the modem only 1 devices will get a IP address.

If what you call a modem is a modem/router then you can connect a switch to it but then I don't understand how your other router fits into the picture.

In any case you do not want to run a seperate network really. It makes sharing of files and printers etc extremely hard. You want to run the new router as a AP. You will always get some interference from the wifi radios unless you set the channel widths to 20mhz. You would then set the channels to not overlap. Setting it to 20mhz though will cut the maximum speeds significantly so you maybe better off leaving them interfere. On the 5g band you still can set the channels to not interfere unless of course you have wifi6 which uses all the channels.
The comm box which has the switch was originally set up for AT&T DSL modem/router so it distributed the internet via Ethernet cables to all the rooms. So I had a second router in the 2nd floor and it was fine. After I switched to Spectrum, they gave me a cable modem and a separate router. So I had them install this router on the 2nd floor since that’s where I work. I thought I could install another network using the 2nd router which is 1750 AC configuration, giving me higher speed if I connect it as a separate network instead of using it as an AP. To connect it as a separate network, then I will either replace the cable modem with a one with the built in router or find a place near the current modem to install the 2nd router before it goes to the switch. Any other suggestions?
 
That is pretty much the problem.

If you have 2 cable between where the modem and switch are and the router you could run 1 cable from the modem to the router wan port and then run a second cable back from the router lan port to the switch.

You can also use vlans to simulate 2 cables but you would need small smart/managed switches that have that ability on both ends. It might be slightly cheaper than buying another router but it will takes some reading so you know how to configure the switches to accomplish this.
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
While I think I understand why you have it this way (speed) it isn't really helping you. Although I only have a rough idea of your network setup, it sounds like you are not using your current setup to its full potential. So try this, keeping in mind that I only have a rough idea of your setup:
  1. Bring the router (wireless, I hope) downstairs and plug it into the modem
  2. Use the router to control devices downstairs.
  3. If you need more than 3 ports, use the forth for an inexpensive switch.
  4. Run the 4th port on the router (or port from the switch) to run to your switch upstairs.
  5. If you need wireless upstarts, just buy another wireless router, and turn off the router function, so that is it only a wireless switch to extend your range (and not lose speed).
 
Apr 10, 2020
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10
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Thanks guys! While I decide on these options, I have one more question.
I have a HD video streaming box connected to Wifi signal downstairs. Since it is near an Ethernet outlet, I would like to connect it with to the Internet via the Ethernet cable that came from the switch (modem-->Internet Ethernet-->Switch-->Wifi Router (2nd floor). The streaming box has setting for a static IP, Default gateway setting. So the question is what will be the IP? Is it same as the default IP provided by my ISP e.g. 192.168.1.1?
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
It it doesn't allow dynamic IP, you can set it to a static IP, just make sure to tell the router that the IP address you are using is reserved (so another device doesn't try to use it and lose it's connection). You would be selecting an IP address available from the router. As billl001g mentioned above, the ISP only gives you one IP address coming from your modem.
 

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