Question How to convert fan speed into fps?

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sxk1277

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Look at this video for instance:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSllkFWVhJI


Once a fan is spinning fast enough, it becomes all black blurry. And though you may still be able to tell a fan is spinning even faster than that by inspecting the different forms of blurriness, it wouldn't really serve you well practically in a first person shooter game. So, what I'm trying to figure out, is how to measure at what revolutions/second do fans become blurry and how to convert that into fps? (I hope there is no correlation with # of blades and blade size but even if there is, we can find an appropriate analogy to gaming or look for a better way to convert our practical limits on fps to gaming)

This method of measuring our practical limit is much better as each person may have unique limit on fps. If you guys have any other way of input of trying to figure out beyond what point, would fps won't matter, let me know.

Thanks
 

hang-the-9

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Record the fans with a high speed camera so you can slow down the blades and calculate how long it takes them to rotate once around the diameter.

I am curious why this fan speed would matter in an FPS game? I really can't make out what you are saying here at all. FPS is just how many frames a second something shows you on the screen, what it has to do with how fast fans are spinning I have no idea where to even start to link the two.
 

JeckeL

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what I'm trying to figure out, is how to measure at what revolutions/second do fans become blurry and how to convert that into fps?
I'm not really sure what you're trying to test, but lets start with "measure what RPM fans become blurry"... "becomes blurry" is a bit of a generic variable. Do you mean blurry to the human eye, filmed with a camera that has a super low shutter speed, or a high speed camera that captures 10,000 fps? I'd imagine it's all relative to the medium, with many different factors... I dunno, it's a bit hard to construe without testing
 

USAFRet

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I have a Fuji camera that will take a short video at 1,000 frames per second (badly).
60/120/480 no problem.

It would be trivial to extrapolate one of those into revolutions per second or minute.

But what the human eye sees directly is completely different than what is presented on a monitor.
 

sxk1277

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Of course blurry to the eye, not the monitor. I'm trying to gauge peak of eye's capability on fps in practical terms. This would allow me to find out how many fps in a game is enough. A fan seemed like the easiest thing. But how would I convert revolutions per second into frames per second?

The fan should become completely blurry though, if there are some patterns in the blurriness, the patterns can be used to still guess where the fan might be. Unless the pattern starts appearing at a very small scale, at that point, the pattern becomes useless. For instance, we used to play this game we would try to catch the moving fan and we could do it judging by the pattern!
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNbrTNxUOB4
 
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hang-the-9

Titan
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Of course blurry to the eye, not the monitor. I'm trying to gauge peak of eye's capability on fps in practical terms. This would allow me to find out how many fps in a game is enough. A fan seemed like the easiest thing. But how would I convert revolutions per second into frames per second?

The fan should become completely blurry though, if there are some patterns in the blurriness, the patterns can be used to still guess where the fan might be. Unless the pattern starts appearing at a very small scale, at that point, the pattern becomes useless. For instance, we used to play this game we would try to catch the moving fan and we could do it judging by the pattern!
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNbrTNxUOB4
Enough FPS in games has already been worked out and estimated years ago, it's about 60 for smoothness in a first person shooter, something slower moving like an RPG, games like WOW, are good at 40 fps to not see much if any lag. I guess you can re-do all your own research again for your benefit but all this is already known.
 
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