Question How to deal with failed Linux Mint install

Mar 18, 2019
94
4
45
2
Given:

Dell Precision M6400
2x Seagate 500G HDD's
8G Ram

The first HDD has a Windows OS on it, and the 2nd HDD was being used for data and backup storage. Recently, I wanted to add Linux Mint 19.1 to this system. I already had the Linux Mint 19.1 Cinnamon x64 ISO on a flash drive which I had used for install on a different machine.

It had been a while since I installed Linux, so I didn't remember if the setup program would create an extended partition while saving data already on a drive. I decided to basically split the 2nd HDD in half through Windows which did save all my data on that drive and left me with about 230G of unused space.

Then I booted with the Linux flash drive and proceeded with the install. As stated above, it had been a while since I ran this, and I initially chose the "Setup Linux along side Windows" (or something like this). Eventually I was presented with a box asking me to "write changes to disk and proceed", but I had not seen any choices pertaining to install location or partition/swap area size.... so I cancelled out of this, got back to the first screen and this time chose "Something else".

Now I was able to specify the unused space on the 2nd HDD, and created the ext4 and Swap partitions. After setup ran for quite a while it stopped at a dialog box saying something like "Bootloader creation failed". I eventually opted for "Continue without creating Bootloader" just to get past this.

I immediately tried running the setup again, this time going straight to "Something Else" option, and Linux reported that my 1st HDD was all Free Space. I continued with the install which once again failed to create a bootloader. (probably because the 1st HDD was left raw). Linux had wiped my 1st HDD clean!!!

At this point of course, the machine would not boot to any OS. I used Macrium Reflect to restore a recent disk image so now I at least had my Windows OS back, and the bootloader for it. I then had to boot with a 3rd party "Boot Repair" utility, which did create a grub dual boot menu.

When I now boot into Linux however, things aren't working well. There are many symptoms to list, but suffice it to say that I don't believe the install completed correctly. So I want to try again, but I'm not sure how to proceed given all of the above.

Do I need to delete or format the existing Linux partitions? Can I leave them be and will the next install attempt erase/replace that OS? And what of the Bootloader now on disk?

Any advive is appreciated.

Thanks,
Wolf
 
Mar 18, 2019
94
4
45
2
So you recovered the whole system from your Macrium backup image?

Then just try that Linux install again.
Yes, I was recently introduced to some free imaging software called Macrium Reflect 7. You install it in Windows. Then you use the installed program to create a bootable ISO for rescue purposes as I just needed. (and really saved my butt!!) The software allows for entire disk imaging, cloning, and both incremental and differential backup scheduling.

I had tested Macrium against 3 other popular imaging programs, and Macrium won out as fastest and most user friendly. I was able to restore my entire Windows install disk byte for byte in about 24 minutes.

But back to the Q at hand.... don't you agree I should at least format if not remove the Linux partitions I created b4 trying to setup again?

Thanks,
Wolf
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
115,578
2,294
145,090
18,836
Yes, I am QUITE familiar with Macrium.
I use it daily.

Was the Image you recovered was from before the Linux install?
If so, then you should be able to start over.

If that Image also contained the now-failed Linux install, then yes...try to delete only those partitions.
 
Mar 18, 2019
94
4
45
2
Yes, I am QUITE familiar with Macrium.
I use it daily.
The Macrium restore I completed only restored the 1st HDD..... the 1st drive BIOS looks for...... the drive that had Windows installed on it.

I had tried to install Linux on a different drive completely. A drive I had already partitioned off for Linux.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
115,578
2,294
145,090
18,836
The Macrium restore I completed only restored the 1st HDD..... the 1st drive BIOS looks for...... the drive that had Windows installed on it.

I had tried to install Linux on a different drive completely. A drive I had already partitioned off for Linux.
Recovering only the one drive is not recovering the whole system.

From out here, it's pretty much impossible to tell what you have now, or how to "fix" it.

Withonly the 'windows drive', does the system boot up and run Windows?
 
Mar 18, 2019
94
4
45
2
I booted back into Windows, deleted the 2 Linux partitions and ran the Mint install program again. This time it setup without any issues.

Solved
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS