How to do a Windows 7 OEM Transfer to a new computer? It is possible, but how do I do it?

SteatlhCp

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The OEM transfer will be done from one desktop motherboard to another, however the same hard drive will be used. This is not illegal in any way, when I bought the computer I also bought everything that came along with it. It can be done as long as there is only one computer with the activated OS. Because OEM operating systems are configured to the specifications of the motherboard, it can't be done without resetting to factory defaults, or, reformatting the hard drive. This particular operating system was preloaded, but it wasn't preinstalled. It could be configured to any motherboard. However... I'm not entirely sure if this will work, or how to go about doing it.

Do I install the motherboard then the operating system like normal using the key on the sticker on my computer case? Or, will this become like the other forums I have seen on this subject, and the people who answer will feel the best decision will be to make me feel bad about myself by saying its illegal and not possible, then continue to argue about it in the comments section? I don't have a disc to install the operating system, the hard drive was already loaded with it. All the files from reformatting/resetting are being stored on an external hard drive, except for about 2300 batch files that said they were "still running" when I copied all the files. however I think I could probably just use some file recovery software anyway, since reformatting doesn't mean overwriting. With that in mind, should I reformat or reset the hard drive? Or is there a better way without throwing away $60 for a new Win7 OS? Any answers are much appreciated, thank you very much!

EDIT: I should have originally included this, but here is an explanation to why this is legal

---When I buy a new house, I could be expected to move the furniture from my old house without the Homeowner Association hounding me over it, saying furniture came with the house to make it cheaper. Transferring the OS to a new computer? This is not thievery, I am not encouraging or participating in software distribution, this is no fraudulent act. When I purchased the computer, I purchased the rights to use it and modify it as I see fit, and just as long as I don't use it to infringe upon the rights of others, I will continue doing so. Whose rights are in any way being violated by me transferring the operating system to a new computer? The operating system can't even be intact on two different systems, so "transferring" is just that: Transferring. It is not copying and distributing. Yes, it is against the licensing agreement, and Microsoft could very well terminate the operating system as they please. That is a risk I will take, Microsoft is legally allowed to do this just as I am legally allowed to transfer one piece of equipment to a new computer.---

I don't think my motherboard model names will help at all for this particular case, but here they are anyway:

CURRENT: Dell 0c2kjt, translated to English, uncommon cheap generic model recycled from an earlier version which has only ever been sold with this specific model PC which, guess what, is an uncommon cheap generic model recycled from an earlier version.
NEW: Gigabyte Z87-D3HP, translated to English, mid-mid-high (between mid-high and mid-mid) end affordable 2011-ish motherboard.
 

thenewnumber2

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I checked the licensing FAQ on Microsoft's web site: they are of the opinion that what you'd like to do is not permitted. here is what I read:

Q. My customer bought a new PC and wants to move the OEM software from the old PC to the new one. Can't users do whatever they want with their software?

A. No, the OEM software is licensed with the computer system on which it was originally installed and is tied to that original machine. OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more than one computer system, even if the original machine is no longer in use. The End User Software License Terms, which the end user must accept before using the software, state that the license may not be shared, transferred to, or used concurrently on different computers. System builders must provide end-user support for the Windows license on computers they build, but cannot support licenses on computers they didn’t build. This is a fundamental reason why OEM System Builder licenses can't be transferred.

Sorry, we can't help you here.
 

Deuce65

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Not going to start an argument with you, but first off, something isn't "legal" just because you say it is. Software licensing agreements have been generally held, at least in the USA, to be legally binding; the OEM license of Windows 7 specifically states that it cannot be transferred to another computer, and defines a different motherboard as a different computer, ergo, by definition, what you are doing is illegal.
Personally, any thievery that goes on is not my business, that's between you and Microsoft and I won't judge. But I don't think anyone here is going to tell you how to do it.
 

thenewnumber2

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I checked the licensing FAQ on Microsoft's web site: they are of the opinion that what you'd like to do is not permitted. here is what I read:

Q. My customer bought a new PC and wants to move the OEM software from the old PC to the new one. Can't users do whatever they want with their software?

A. No, the OEM software is licensed with the computer system on which it was originally installed and is tied to that original machine. OEM licenses are single-use licenses that cannot be installed on more than one computer system, even if the original machine is no longer in use. The End User Software License Terms, which the end user must accept before using the software, state that the license may not be shared, transferred to, or used concurrently on different computers. System builders must provide end-user support for the Windows license on computers they build, but cannot support licenses on computers they didn’t build. This is a fundamental reason why OEM System Builder licenses can't be transferred.

Sorry, we can't help you here.
 

SteatlhCp

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When I buy a new house, I could be expected to move the furniture from my old house without the Homeowner Association hounding me over it, saying furniture came with the house to make it cheaper. Transferring the OS to a new computer? This is not thievery, I am not encouraging or participating in software distribution, this is no fraudulent act. When I purchased the computer, I purchased the rights to use it and modify it as I see fit, and just as long as I don't use it to infringe upon the rights of others, I will continue doing so. Whose rights are in any way being violated by me transferring the operating system to a new computer? The operating system can't even be intact on two different systems, so "transferring" is just that: Transferring. It is not copying and distributing. Yes, it is against the licensing agreement, and Microsoft could very well terminate the operating system as they please. That is a risk I will take, Microsoft is legally allowed to do this just as I am legally allowed to transfer one piece of equipment to a new computer. If you still don't want to help since it is against Microsoft's Terms and Conditions, that is fine, but I won't sit by while someone accuses me of participating in or encouraging illegal acts. Just as you (almost) said yourself, something isn't "illegal" just because you say it is.
 

SteatlhCp

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That's a shame. Cheers anyway, good man.
 

Deuce65

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I'll say once again that you are simple wrong and the US courts have consistently ruled that you are wrong, and that if you wish to do this you will have to do it on your own.
To use your analogy, yes, if you bought a house you would be allowed to bring your old furniture with you, UNLESS you signed a contract with the homeowners associatiation that you bought the house from stating you would get a discount on the house for using their furniture. That is what you did when you purchased the OEM version of the software, you agreed you use it on *one* computer\motherboard and in return received a substantial discount.
You said that you didn't want to argue and yet you posted in such a way that you knew an argument would ensue, In any case, good luck and enjoy :)
 

SteatlhCp

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I never said I didn't want to argue, that was your own phrase. But if I'm accused of doing something illegal, I am perfectly happy with arguing. Minus the first statement (source?) your argument, as far as I'm concerned, is just as valid as mine. At the same time, however, when I purchased the computer, I knew nothing of "OEM" licenses. If I knew what I know now, I would have bought the operating system separate, or just used a free OS. I barely knew anything about software, nevermind software agreements. I wasn't even at the legal age to accept a binding agreement. You are right, if I signed such a contract with the Homeowner Association, I most definitely would be expected to uphold it. Such a contract would be explicitly written, not at all like these OEM contracts, which aren't even handled when the new computer is set up. I'm sure it's in that gigantic mess of an agreement somewhere in the Windows 7 End User Terms and Conditions, which no sane person should be expected to read, those conditions are designed just for that.
 

juliansol

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I know this is an old post but i just wanted to share you my experience. I bought a professional and wanted to transfer my old home premium to my older computer. So what i did was call windows to transfer it and had told them that i am a builder myself and need to transfer it and it worked. Heck one of my neighbors even told them that their motherboard and hard drive got corrupted. So im just saying.
 

Josh_1983

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I just spoke with an online agent via instant message and he told me I couldn't transfer windows 7 to another PC even if I uninstalled it off the original PC because it was an OEM. Please give me insight on how you managed to get them to let you transfer it. Thanks
 

thenewnumber2

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Apparently, the MS service agents ARE able to permit an OEM license to be transferred, but they aren't "supposed to". I guess you have to catch them when they're in a good mood!

 

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