Question how to find CPU base voltage??

Dec 3, 2019
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so i have a ryzen 7 2700 (non-x) and i would like to overclock it, but my mobo uses an voltage offset and idk how much voltage to add because idk my base voltage. how would i find it? or if you know could you directly tell me it? please and thank you!
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
your bios should tell you what voltage the CPU is running at.
but it probably changes based the on the load.

all you can do is just start bumping up the multiplier and running stress tests until it crashes, then bump up the voltage in small/medium amounts until it's stable again then continue raising the multiplier until you reach one of the following barriers:

1) You reach a voltage offset that if you go any further would be considered unsafe.

2) You start raising voltage multiplier quite a bit with no change in stability therefore you must dial back the multiplier and voltage offset to the previous stable options.

3) Temperatures are at a point that you shouldn't try going any further.

4) Any combination of the above three.

Once you've found your max stable overclock/temps, start dialing back the voltage offset in the smallest increments possible until unstable then revert back up by one of those small increments so that you are running your overclock stable at as little voltage as possible.

This is basically the short and sweet version of how to overclock.
As for any other little options you can mess with, that will be down to what board and BIOS you are using and looking into any guides for that specific hardware on places like https://overclock.net and https://TweakTown.com


As for seeing your voltage on the CPU, as I said, it will most likely adapt and change based on the load, so it'll be lower when idle, and higher when boosting (called turbo boost on Intel) due to a heavy load.

You can use CPU-Z to see these things or HWMonitor while loaded into Windows.
 
Last edited:
Dec 3, 2019
8
0
10
0
your bios should tell you what voltage the CPU is running at.
but it probably changes based the on the load.

all you can do is just start bumping up the multiplier and running stress tests until it crashes, then bump up the voltage in small/medium amounts until it's stable again then continue raising the multiplier until you reach one of the following barriers:

1) You reach a voltage offset that if you go any further would be considered unsafe.

2) You start raising voltage multiplier quite a bit with no change in stability therefore you must dial back the multiplier and voltage offset to the previous stable options.

3) Temperatures are at a point that you shouldn't try going any further.

4) Any combination of the above three.

Once you've found your max stable overclock/temps, start dialing back the voltage offset in the smallest increments possible until unstable then revert back up by one of those small increments so that you are running your overclock stable at as little voltage as possible.

This is basically the short and sweet version of how to overclock.
As for any other little options you can mess with, that will be down to what board and BIOS you are using and looking into any guides for that specific hardware on places like overclockers.net


As for seeing your voltage on the CPU, as I said, it will most likely adapt and change based on the load, so it'll be lower when idle, and higher when boosting (called turbo boost on Intel) due to a heavy load.

You can use CPU-Z to see these things or HWMonitor while loaded into Windows.

cool and thanks for your reply, however just notcied that in ryzebn master i could get 3.8 stable with 1.175v but in bios i need it to be 1.325v in order to achieve stability. y is this the case?

i also noticed that when bumping up the voltage in bios, the voltage reading in hwinfo dosen't show correct voltages, never going above 1v. i verified this with some other softwares as well like CPUID. why is this the case?

note that i have the latest bios, drivers, os etc.
 
Dec 3, 2019
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you should use Ryzen master if your motherboard BIOS doesn't quite have the full set of overclocking features needed for a more fine tuned overclock.
ok will try it out..tho i prefer the old school bios tweaking....XD...it was a fool of me to buy a gigabyte motherboard...
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
ok will try it out..tho i prefer the old school bios tweaking....XD...it was a fool of me to buy a gigabyte motherboard...
Gigabyte is not different than any other board. what makes a difference is the tier it's in.
a cheap board will have cheap BIOS configuration and options because it has lesser and less components built onto the board for things like overclocking.

Plain and simple.

But yeah, I always have been a fan of ASUS, even on the budget end when it comes to sheer BIOS features.

Cheap boards will have less in the way of nitty gritty controls for overclocking and higher end more expensive boards will have more options.

And it's especially more the case with the 400 series boards for the 2000 series chips.
To get full blown features like you may be used to on some budget and more mid range boards from the Z series for Intel, you'll have to go into the high end for that generation of AMD.

But with the new Zen2 stuff with the 500 series boards, manufacturers are taking things more seriously now and making banger boards even on the low end for 3000 series chips.
 
Dec 3, 2019
8
0
10
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Gigabyte is not different than any other board. what makes a difference is the tier it's in.
a cheap board will have cheap BIOS configuration and options because it has lesser and less components built onto the board for things like overclocking.

Plain and simple.

But yeah, I always have been a fan of ASUS, even on the budget end when it comes to sheer BIOS features.

Cheap boards will have less in the way of nitty gritty controls for overclocking and higher end more expensive boards will have more options.

And it's especially more the case with the 400 series boards for the 2000 series chips.
To get full blown features like you may be used to on some budget and more mid range boards from the Z series for Intel, you'll have to go into the high end for that generation of AMD.

But with the new Zen2 stuff with the 500 series boards, manufacturers are taking things more seriously now and making banger boards even on the low end for 3000 series chips.
i was looking for a good board for my r7 2700 and i came across the b450 aorus pro wifi and man did it look nice! but after awhile did start reveling to me that it got soooo many problems. im saying little bios options, horrible sensors, and one of the worst vrm temps..! and i do agree with you, my previous intel build used an asus board and never ever did i encounter any problems. gigabyte really gotta do those people who didn't do research with the nice rgb and design.
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
i was looking for a good board for my r7 2700 and i came across the b450 aorus pro wifi and man did it look nice! but after awhile did start reveling to me that it got soooo many problems. im saying little bios options, horrible sensors, and one of the worst vrm temps..! and i do agree with you, my previous intel build used an asus board and never ever did i encounter any problems. gigabyte really gotta do those people who didn't do research with the nice rgb and design.
Yeah, but it's not cuz Gigabyte is bad like I said, it's just that most boards were not all that great unless getting the top tier when it came to the second gen Ryzen.

Things are much better now with the third generation boards.
which you could totally upgrade to if you felt like it since it's backwards compatible with previous generation CPU's. So you could easily just pick out a nice X570 if you have the money and want to try and squeeze out as much as you can from your 2700 until you feel like upgrading to a newer generation CPU like the 3000 or 4000 series (4000 when it releases).
Also could end up upgrading to 3000 series when 4000 releases cuz it'll be cheaper at that point LOL.
 
Dec 3, 2019
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Yeah, but it's not cuz Gigabyte is bad like I said, it's just that most boards were not all that great unless getting the top tier when it came to the second gen Ryzen.

Things are much better now with the third generation boards.
which you could totally upgrade to if you felt like it since it's backwards compatible with previous generation CPU's. So you could easily just pick out a nice X570 if you have the money and want to try and squeeze out as much as you can from your 2700 until you feel like upgrading to a newer generation CPU like the 3000 or 4000 series (4000 when it releases).
Also could end up upgrading to 3000 series when 4000 releases cuz it'll be cheaper at that point LOL.
tbh...it's not like im losing on a ton of performance right now, i can game, video edit and Photoshop just fine. would probably upgrade maybe in a couple years, tho ill remember to research my shit. i agree, would prob just buy a premium ryzen 4000 and see how far i could get with that.

also i really appreciate your thoughts on this, thanks!
 

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