Question How to get rid of error during startup "BIOS date time not set and keyboard not found"

Jul 29, 2020
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I am getting this message the second time even after replacing the battery. Previously, I was getting this message on my windows 7 and I had to change the date and time everytime after starting the windows in order to work on the internet. Almost 3 weeks ago I replace the CMOS battery and everything was working fine untill 2 weeks after replacing. However, from the last week I am getting the same message again during startup. Can anybody tell what is the actual issue?
 

Darkbreeze

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Where did you buy the replacement battery?

Do you have access to a volt meter, to test the battery?

I've bought more than one CMOS battery that had moderately less than 3v because it had been sitting on the store shelf for so long and I didn't bother to check the date code on the packaging before I bought it. I don't do that anymore.

If the battery is actually fully charged and it clearly isn't the problem based on the results of testing it with a volt meter, then it's probable that you have a failing BIOS ROM or just a failing motherboard in general.

How old is this system/motherboard?

What are the full hardware specs?

The fact that you are getting keyboard errors indicates to me that it's possible, maybe even probable, that the problem extends beyond simply being a battery problem, but the two problems (date/time AND keyboard) taken together MIGHT be a good indicator of a hardware level issue with the motherboard itself.
 
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Karadjgne

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Or could be a keyboard issue. I've seen more than 1 usb keyboard with a failing/broken/pinched wire create backfeed enough to do everything and anything you describe to forcing windows issues, instant pc shutdowns, motherboard protective circuitry (mostly asus) tripping, psu instant shutdowns etc.

Also seen multiple issues with add on USB hardware, some USB hdds, cameras, joysticks etc that are not exactly fully usb regulation compliant and cause multiple bios issues.

Same with root kit virus and malware.
 

Karadjgne

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It's a power drain/leak thing, I'm betting the battery is probably about dead, new or not. Usb can cause that since the 5v stays active for keyboards, mouses, timers etc. All that is going through the mobo. If there's a feedback issue, it basically can get to the point where the mobo doesn't shut off the cmos battery when the pc is in use switching the bios to psu power, allowing it to stay on constantly and draining dead after a few days.

Best way I can describe it is the pc doesn't get a full and complete shutdown, so doesn't get a full and complete startup, there's always something left behind.
 
Jul 29, 2020
5
0
10
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Where did you buy the replacement battery?

Do you have access to a volt meter, to test the battery?

I've bought more than one CMOS battery that had moderately less than 3v because it had been sitting on the store shelf for so long and I didn't bother to check the date code on the packaging before I bought it. I don't do that anymore.

If the battery is actually fully charged and it clearly isn't the problem based on the results of testing it with a volt meter, then it's probable that you have a failing BIOS ROM or just a failing motherboard in general.

How old is this system/motherboard?

What are the full hardware specs?

The fact that you are getting keyboard errors indicates to me that it's possible, maybe even probable, that the problem extends beyond simply being a battery problem, but the two problems (date/time AND keyboard) taken together MIGHT be a good indicator of a hardware level issue with the motherboard itself.
Yes, It may be the case of low voltage battery because I bought it from a local hardware shop and the battery is not a brand new battery. The shopkeeper also had it on its shelf. Unfortunately , I have no access of volt meter.

Actaully first time I got this error when I replaced my old casing 1 year ago. So obviously, the new casing also has a new motherboard. So i bear this message for almost 1 year. I don't know how old is motherboard. Can i check its model?

Here are my device specs.

View: https://imgur.com/a/8jGIHT4
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If you have an i3-2100 then you have a system that is about 9 years old. Exactly at the age where it becomes common for motherboard failures. Right now we are in the midst of seeing a lot of Sandy bridge (YOUR CPU generation) and Ivy bridge (The generation after yours) motherboard failures as they are all about 8-9 years old and for daily driver systems that is a pretty good stretch if the system has seen a lot of use.

But, I'd try getting a FOR SURE good battery first, before I did anything else.
 
Jul 29, 2020
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It's a power drain/leak thing, I'm betting the battery is probably about dead, new or not. Usb can cause that since the 5v stays active for keyboards, mouses, timers etc. All that is going through the mobo. If there's a feedback issue, it basically can get to the point where the mobo doesn't shut off the cmos battery when the pc is in use switching the bios to psu power, allowing it to stay on constantly and draining dead after a few days.

Best way I can describe it is the pc doesn't get a full and complete shutdown, so doesn't get a full and complete startup, there's always something left behind.
I don't think it is a keyword issue because I have just bought the new one as well. However, your complete shutdown point is possible becasue sometimes I see an error (with some complex hexa code) for just a few seconds just before the shutdown process. One more thing is quite interesting is that when I don't switch off the button from the wall socket, I don't see this message at all.
 
Jul 29, 2020
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If you have an i3-2100 then you have a system that is about 9 years old. Exactly at the age where it becomes common for motherboard failures. Right now we are in the midst of seeing a lot of Sandy bridge (YOUR CPU generation) and Ivy bridge (The generation after yours) motherboard failures as they are all about 8-9 years old and for daily driver systems that is a pretty good stretch if the system has seen a lot of use.

But, I'd try getting a FOR SURE good battery first, before I did anything else.
So what will you suggest? Can i still use the system for some years with this system error. And what if you purchase a new cmos battery online and install it by own. Then what should be the good options for batteries?
 
Jul 29, 2020
5
0
10
0
If you have an i3-2100 then you have a system that is about 9 years old. Exactly at the age where it becomes common for motherboard failures. Right now we are in the midst of seeing a lot of Sandy bridge (YOUR CPU generation) and Ivy bridge (The generation after yours) motherboard failures as they are all about 8-9 years old and for daily driver systems that is a pretty good stretch if the system has seen a lot of use.

But, I'd try getting a FOR SURE good battery first, before I did anything else.
So darkbreeze, what you will suggest? Should I replace the motherboard altogether? Or, I can work with it for a few more years.
 

Karadjgne

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One more thing is quite interesting is that when I don't switch off the button from the wall socket, I don't see this message at all.
Meaning when you turn off the plug at the wall socket and the pc has 0 power for any length of time, when you reapply power you get that message.

There's only 1 function of that tiny battery, that's to supply trickle power to the cmos chip which holds the variable bios information and settings. When you put power to the mother, pthe motherboard is supposed to disconnect the battery and takes over power regulation of the cmos. Like in a car, once it's started the alternator runs things, not the battery.

So I see one of 3 possible issues. You got given an old and mostly dead battery from that shelf. The motherboard is failing to switch over to pc power leaving the battery running full time or you have a power leak allowing the battery to drain when the plug is turned off.

I have a 3rd gen pc. It's almost 8 years old and contains the original battery that came with the motherboard. That's how little power the cmos actually requires.

I'd start with a new battery. They are cheap. It's a watch battery, you can get them anywhere, most drug stores have them, hardware stores, anybody who sells batteries usually has them. They are not specific to motherboards and if that shopkeeper sold you a used one off the shelf, that was pretty dirty business.

But I'd start with that and see how things go, because any further repair is pointless at this age, a newer motherboard platform will cost almost as much as trying to find an acceptable motherboard to fit your pc now. And will still be 8-9 years old and used. Very large gamble on capacitor lifespan.
 

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