[SOLVED] How to install windows 10 on new SSD

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Hi all!

So for all of the systems I have had I have always used an HDD drive but I want to upgrade to an SSD, but I haven't done anything like this before . So I was planning to keep my HDD drive as a secondary drive to store pictures, videos, and other files on it and have the SSD as the boot drive and so forth. So from what I have gathered online this is what I should do; I would first put windows 10 on a USB stick using the mediacreationtool from Microsoft. Than I would shutdown my PC. After it is powered off I would than unplug my HDD and plug in my new SSD. After the SSD is plugged in I would than plug in the flash drive to the computer and turn on the PC, following the instructions. So than after I have loaded up windows, to the extent where I have access to the desktop, I would than turn off my PC once again, plugging in my old HDD, turning on my PC, than instead of loading up the desktop I would go into the BIOS find and select the option to boot from the SSD. After that, continue to the desktop, open up the HDD and delete the old os from the HDD.

Don't know if that is the correct way of doing it. Also this was the SSD I was going to get https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIADGE8TY8331&ignorebbr=1 and just to make sure is this compatible with my mobo/system?

My system:
CPU: Intel Core i7-8700 @ 3.20GHz
RAM: 16.0GB Dual-channel https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820232242
MOBO: Gigabyte B360 Arous gaming 3 https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813145061
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB
CPU Cooler: CORSAIR HYDRO SERIES H75 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler

Also, I have a vertical drive bay at the bottom of my computer, which can hold three drives. Should I get one of these https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817997037&ignorebbr=1 so the SSD can fit in the bay? here is my case and some images of the bay https://www.evetech.co.za/PC-Hardware/thermaltake-core-x31-rgb-edition-gaming-pc-case-2027.aspx

Any suggestions, tips, and information would be great!

Thanks.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that's exactly what you would do.
Some things to note:
  1. When prompted for a license key (assuming you're already activated), just skip. You';ll reactivate when back online & can communicate with the MS servers.
  2. When ensuring the SSD is set to boot priorty #1, you may see the option for "windows boot manager" in addition to the SSD name - in that instance, you want the boot manager selected. I'd suggest setting your boot order accurately (boot manager/SSD to #1) BEFORE reconnecting the HDD as that can confuse matters if there's an OS already installed.
That's a great SSD, and totally compatible.

You can secure an SSD however you want - it doesn't necessarily have to be in a bay. As there are no moving parts, it's not even necessary to secure it in place - although it is a good idea if you tend to move your system.


As a side note, I would suggest backing up the data from the HDD and formatting it (once you're up and running on the SSD). Having two drives with OS's on them can occassionally be problematic & a nightmare to troubleshoot.
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Yes, that's exactly what you would do.
Some things to note:
  1. When prompted for a license key (assuming you're already activated), just skip. You';ll reactivate when back online & can communicate with the MS servers.
  2. When ensuring the SSD is set to boot priorty #1, you may see the option for "windows boot manager" in addition to the SSD name - in that instance, you want the boot manager selected. I'd suggest setting your boot order accurately (boot manager/SSD to #1) BEFORE reconnecting the HDD as that can confuse matters if there's an OS already installed.
That's a great SSD, and totally compatible.

You can secure an SSD however you want - it doesn't necessarily have to be in a bay. As there are no moving parts, it's not even necessary to secure it in place - although it is a good idea if you tend to move your system.


As a side note, I would suggest backing up the data from the HDD and formatting it (once you're up and running on the SSD). Having two drives with OS's on them can occassionally be problematic & a nightmare to troubleshoot.
Would it make that much of a difference if I just didn't reuse the HDD, and just had the SSD? Because I mean I wouldn't care to much if I didn't use it, I mainly suggested that because I have read and talked to others and they said I should reuse it. And I mean I don't have a lot of data on my computer, like I don't have a bunch of pictures and stuff like that.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Not at all - if a 1TB SSD is sufficient for your needs, there's no 'need' to keep the HDD around.

Most people have found a small(ish) SSD + larger HDD to be the best 'value' in the past - but SSD prices have come way down. If 1TB Storage is all you need, then it may aswell be all-SSD! Just be mindful that you don't want to fill an SSD up to near capacity.
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Not at all - if a 1TB SSD is sufficient for your needs, there's no 'need' to keep the HDD around.

Most people have found a small(ish) SSD + larger HDD to be the best 'value' in the past - but SSD prices have come way down. If 1TB Storage is all you need, then it may aswell be all-SSD! Just be mindful that you don't want to fill an SSD up to near capacity.
Yeah, I mean I don't have a lot of programs/big programs, and I have survived over the years with a 1 TB hard-drive and I don't think I have reached close to the max. Also, what would count for near capacity for 1 TB? And I am a little nervous about doing this just because I don't want to mess something up, is there anything that could go catastrophically wrong?

Regarding a mount, would this https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817994162&ignorebbr=1 work? So all I would do is put the SSD in this, slide it into my driver bay and that's it?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
70% / 700GB range would probably be the comfortable upper-end.
Take a look at your HDD now, how much space have you used on it?

No, there's nothing that can go catastrophically wrong provided you use common sense. It's fairly foolproof and, provided you have your HDD disconnected at the time, your data is safe too (I mean, don't go throwing the HDD around the room or taking the drive for a swim or anything :lol:)

As for mounting the drive, looks like the drive bays themselves already support 3.5" AND 2.5" drives - so you don't need any additional brackets.
There's also mounts behind the MB tray, so you could natively support 6 2.5" SSDs without any adapters... Potentially 8, but I don't know what a "power cover" is... maybe a case addon?
https://www.thermaltake.com/products-model_Specification.aspx?id=C_00002786
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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70% / 700GB range would probably be the comfortable upper-end.
Take a look at your HDD now, how much space have you used on it?

No, there's nothing that can go catastrophically wrong provided you use common sense. It's fairly foolproof and, provided you have your HDD disconnected at the time, your data is safe too (I mean, don't go throwing the HDD around the room or taking the drive for a swim or anything :lol:)

As for mounting the drive, looks like the drive bays themselves already support 3.5" AND 2.5" drives - so you don't need any additional brackets.
There's also mounts behind the MB tray, so you could natively support 6 2.5" SSDs without any adapters... Potentially 8, but I don't know what a "power cover" is... maybe a case addon?
https://www.thermaltake.com/products-model_Specification.aspx?id=C_00002786
My drive right now is 302 GB out of a possible 930 GB. But since I would have to re-download programs, there are bound to be a few of them that I don't need, which will free up some extra space.

Oh, yeah I guess my case does support 2.5" drivers. I assuming, as you were saying, that the SSD wouldn't be held in the driver bay, but more situated in side one of the trays without much support.
 

I Josh I

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No, they'll be secured in the bays. They'll screw to the tray from the underside, most likely.

Oh yeah, if you're using 300gb/1tb you'll have no issues with a 1tb SSD
Oh, ok, I see on the sides of the trays where screws would hold the SSD in. Ok so I feel like I have much more incite on what I am doing and just to make sure this is what I am going to do;

Step 1: I am going to back up my documents on a separate hard-drive

Step 2: I am going to install windows 10 on a USB stick using the MediaCreationTool from Microsoft.

Step 3: Shut down my computer (unless it automatically shuts down after I put windows 10 on the USB stick)

Step 4: After my computer has completely shut down I will remove my old HDD and plug in the new SSD

Question: After I have plugged my SSD in and started up my computer do I need to enter the bios and select the USB as the start drive so it can install windows? Or will it automatically choose that?

Step 5: I will boot up my computer and install windows, disregarding the license key part (since I already have a key)

Step 6: Done!

Notes; Do I need to go into the bios afterword and change the boot drive to the SSD? Or if the windows boot manager pops up can I just make sure that the SDD is number #1?

If you see any thing wrong in my process let me know.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Personally, I would add a step 0 to the equation.

Step 0: Download drivers for your motherboard (chipset, USB etc) and GPU. Place them on an external drive for use later.
Step 1: Good idea.
Step 2: Correct. Note you may have to disable anti-virus software to fully complete the creation. Shouldn't be necessary, but I have seen it happen once or twice.
Step 3: The tool will not shut down your system, you will have to perform that action.
Step 4: Flip the power switch on the PSU and drain any residual power (hold down the case power button for a couple of seconds) to be 100% safe. Hard to damage anything, but better safe....

Response: I wouldn't change the boot order, but there is a one-time "boot override" functionality in most BIOS's. F8 is common. That'll allow you to boot from the SSD for that time only. You'll see two options
[UEFI]NameOfUSB
NameOfUSB
You'll want to select the [UEFI] option.

Step 5: correct. I would not connect to the internet at this stage though, personally*. Do not provide a wifi password during install, or remove your ethernet cable.
Once you're online, you'll reactivate provided you're reinstalling the same version of Windows (Home/Pro, etc). You'll be given the options to install when you first boot from the USB.

Step 6: Install drivers downloaded in step #0.
Step 7: Once drivers are installed, connect to the internet & ensure you activate (Settings>Update&Security>Activation), you may need to refresh.
Step 8: Run Windows Update

Notes: It's a good idea to head to the BIOS and ensure the SSD or boot manager is set to priority #1. If it's the only drive connected that's bootable, you should be fine.... but it certainly won't hurt.


*The only reason I don't go online immediately, is Windows has a tendency to try to 'help' find drivers, and usually ends up installing older or basic drivers which you then should update anyway, duplicating the work.
If you have the latest appropriate drivers onhand (ie step #0), then installing those will ensure you're up to speed and Windows won't install anything on top of those.
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Personally, I would add a step 0 to the equation.

Step 0: Download drivers for your motherboard (chipset, USB etc) and GPU. Place them on an external drive for use later.
Step 1: Good idea.
Step 2: Correct. Note you may have to disable anti-virus software to fully complete the creation. Shouldn't be necessary, but I have seen it happen once or twice.
Step 3: The tool will not shut down your system, you will have to perform that action.
Step 4: Flip the power switch on the PSU and drain any residual power (hold down the case power button for a couple of seconds) to be 100% safe. Hard to damage anything, but better safe....

Response: I wouldn't change the boot order, but there is a one-time "boot override" functionality in most BIOS's. F8 is common. That'll allow you to boot from the SSD for that time only. You'll see two options
[UEFI]NameOfUSB
NameOfUSB
You'll want to select the [UEFI] option.

Step 5: correct. I would not connect to the internet at this stage though, personally*. Do not provide a wifi password during install, or remove your ethernet cable.
Once you're online, you'll reactivate provided you're reinstalling the same version of Windows (Home/Pro, etc). You'll be given the options to install when you first boot from the USB.

Step 6: Install drivers downloaded in step #0.
Step 7: Once drivers are installed, connect to the internet & ensure you activate (Settings>Update&Security>Activation), you may need to refresh.
Step 8: Run Windows Update

Notes: It's a good idea to head to the BIOS and ensure the SSD or boot manager is set to priority #1. If it's the only drive connected that's bootable, you should be fine.... but it certainly won't hurt.


*The only reason I don't go online immediately, is Windows has a tendency to try to 'help' find drivers, and usually ends up installing older or basic drivers which you then should update anyway, duplicating the work.
If you have the latest appropriate drivers onhand (ie step #0), then installing those will ensure you're up to speed and Windows won't install anything on top of those.
For your 'response', when I boot up my computer with the SSD installed and the USB stick in, I need to enter the bios and select the [UEFI]USB stick, correct? I need to do that because I need to install windows, which is on the USB stick, than after I have installed windows (and have installed all of the drives and windows updates) I can remove the USB and double check in the bios that the SSD is priority #1. Hopefully I got it. Also for the internet thing, that makes sense. I have an external hard drive which I can download drivers for my mobo/GPU. I also have a laptop so if I am missing any drivers I can just download it on there than transfer it to my desktop.

Side note; Do you know when I can actually remove the USB stick? Like once I have access to the desktop can I remove it than?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Maybe. Some boats allow a boot override without entering the BIOS - much like you you'd press "DEL" on boot to enter the BIOS, you'd press F8 for a one-time boot override.
Not all boards do, and I believe Gigabyte's BIOS you go to save & exit tab, where there's a one-time boot override option.

When you're selecting what to boot from, select the [UEFI] variant, yes.

Beyond that, you've got it.


As for removing the USB drive.... You can safely do so after these screens, during the reboot (had to go find a YT vid to grab some screenshots).



During that reboot, you can remove it. However, if you're only using a one-time override, it doesn't matter - you'll boot from the SSD after that reboot & the install will continue.
If you happen to boot back to the USB drive and start from the beginning, just force a restart & remove the USB - it'll then continue with the SSD (and would indicate the SSD is not priority #1)
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Maybe. Some boats allow a boot override without entering the BIOS - much like you you'd press "DEL" on boot to enter the BIOS, you'd press F8 for a one-time boot override.
Not all boards do, and I believe Gigabyte's BIOS you go to save & exit tab, where there's a one-time boot override option.

When you're selecting what to boot from, select the [UEFI] variant, yes.

Beyond that, you've got it.


As for removing the USB drive.... You can safely do so after these screens, during the reboot (had to go find a YT vid to grab some screenshots).



During that reboot, you can remove it. However, if you're only using a one-time override, it doesn't matter - you'll boot from the SSD after that reboot & the install will continue.
If you happen to boot back to the USB drive and start from the beginning, just force a restart & remove the USB - it'll then continue with the SSD (and would indicate the SSD is not priority #1)
So the boot override option is like a one time thing. We just want to boot with the USB stick, than afterwords the computer will discard it (as a main drive). So when I install my SSD I would enter the bios, under the override tab (or wherever it is) I would select the [UEFI] USB and than save exit/continue?

Ok, so after it installs windows the system will want to reboot, and when that happens I can remove the USB stick. And so if I use the boot override option (after I have installed my SSD not when the computer is restarting for the installation process) it will automatically choose the SSD, and continue to the desktop. Correct?

Edit: I found the boot override option. So after I have installed my SSD, I would go into the bios, and under the boot override option, the usb stick would be there, and I would than select the [UEFI] USB. What would I do next? Do I click the save & exit setup?

Here is a picture: https://ibb.co/N95VQXb
 
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Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Yes, it's a one time thing. Correct, the override will allow it to boot from the USB a single time.

Correct, save & exit. Also correct, the system should boot from the SSD once the USB is removed (or even with it still installed post reboot).
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Yes, it's a one time thing. Correct, the override will allow it to boot from the USB a single time.

Correct, save & exit. Also correct, the system should boot from the SSD once the USB is removed (or even with it still installed post reboot).
Excellent! Well, I think now I can remove my HDD and install my SDD without any problems. :) Also, the SSD I was looking at, it didn't seem to say if it came with any cables. I am assuming it come with screws, but not cables. And by my knowledge you need two cables for an SSD, one for power, and the other for data. For data I was going to get this guy https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812119270&ignorebbr=1 and for power I was going to get this https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA7RD3YF7012&Description=sata power cable&cm_re=sata_power_cable--12-200-468--Product
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Your power supply should have at least 4 SATA power connectors..... Probably even 2 cables with 3-4 SATA connectors on them.

You shouldn't need to purchase anything additional.

Which power supply do you have? I don't see it mentioned...
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Hmmm, are you already using that PSU?
Not a great unit, but also not going to be a firehazard. As an FYI, I'd probably budget for a PSU upgrade sooner than later.

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=100-W1-0500-KR
That unit has 2x SATA runs, with 3 on each (spaced accordingly, as per the specs in the link).

You could power 6 drives from that PSU, assuming spacing lined up. With only two drives to power, you could even have dedicated cables for each (although not likely to be required unless you HDD and SSD are spaced a good distance apart).
 

I Josh I

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Feb 12, 2019
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Hmmm, are you already using that PSU?
Not a great unit, but also not going to be a firehazard. As an FYI, I'd probably budget for a PSU upgrade sooner than later.

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=100-W1-0500-KR
That unit has 2x SATA runs, with 3 on each (spaced accordingly, as per the specs in the link).

You could power 6 drives from that PSU, assuming spacing lined up. With only two drives to power, you could even have dedicated cables for each (although not likely to be required unless you HDD and SSD are spaced a good distance apart).
Here is a picture of the back of my current HDD. The cable I have circled, is that an SSD power cable? https://ibb.co/PmVZD10

Yeah, probably should look into getting a new one. I have upgraded basically everything in my PC expect for the power supply. Should I get a new PSU as soon as possible or just in the near future the next time I am ordering something? Any that you would suggest?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Yup, it's a SATA power cable. That's what you're looking for.

How old is that PSU? Personally, I'd replace it. But, you could probably wait for a sale or something, unless your hand is forced if you start experiencing instability.

We get pretty screwed in Canada on PSUs specifically. Right now, you could have the CX450M from Corsair for ~$50 after a rebate, which is more than sufficient for that build
https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/FQ648d/corsair-power-supply-cp9020101na

However, I did see top tier units like a 550W G3 from EVGA go on sale over the holidays for $75 or something (MemoryExpress). That would be a unit I'd have confidence in for numerous rounds of upgrades & for the full warranty period (10 years).
The CX450 is a good unit, but still aimed for users on a budget. In the US you can pick them up for $20 after rebates pretty commonly, and they're backed by a 5year warranty.
 

I Josh I

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Yup, it's a SATA power cable. That's what you're looking for.

How old is that PSU? Personally, I'd replace it. But, you could probably wait for a sale or something, unless your hand is forced if you start experiencing instability.

We get pretty screwed in Canada on PSUs specifically. Right now, you could have the CX450M from Corsair for ~$50 after a rebate, which is more than sufficient for that build
https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/FQ648d/corsair-power-supply-cp9020101na

However, I did see top tier units like a 550W G3 from EVGA go on sale over the holidays for $75 or something (MemoryExpress). That would be a unit I'd have confidence in for numerous rounds of upgrades & for the full warranty period (10 years).
The CX450 is a good unit, but still aimed for users on a budget. In the US you can pick them up for $20 after rebates pretty commonly, and they're backed by a 5year warranty.
So Basically when I install the SSD all I need to do is unplug the cords from the HDD, secure the SDD into the bay, take the SATA cable, plug it into the SSD than plug the other end into the spot on the motherboard where the HHD cord was plugged in. Than just connect the power cable that is in the picture to the SSD and I am done.

For my power supply, I have had it for 3~ years, maybe even a little less. I haven't had any problems had at all. I mean I don't know really what I would be experiencing if the power supply was unstable, but I mean overall, my PC setup has been great. Should I look at getting a PSU asap, or can it wait a bit (say a month or two). So you would recommend this guy for my setup https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438095&ignorebbr=1
 
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