Question How to know when GPU cooler or CPU cooler dies

Aug 2, 2019
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Hello, I'm Steve, new to the forum.
I'm relatively new to owning a desktop PC. I built my first one 2 years ago and have had 0 hardware issues. This is my build: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/dz9c92/saved/
I was just wondering when would I know when my GPU cooler or CPU cooler dies. I know it may seem obvious to most but I wear a headset constantly so I wouldnt hear any problems.
  • Does the computer or components itself have a failsafe? I assume they do but just want to know what to expect.
  • I dont expect these stock AIO coolers to last more than a couple years. If one fails, is that component toast and is it wise to replace a otherwise good working AIO cooler after a couple years just to be safe? Or is there way to measure the life of the cooler/pump itself?
  • If my GPU cooler dies, is there replacements for it even though its a hybrid card or would I have to get a generic AIO cooler for it?
Thank you for your replies!
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

Does the computer or components itself have a failsafe?
Virtually always yes, components will throttle themselves or shut themselves off when they overheat. You can also encoutner shut downs, BSOD, and temperature errors. Not always, but you'll always encounter one of them. A component will shut down before it causes damage in most cases.

If one fails, is that component toast and is it wise to replace a otherwise good working AIO cooler after a couple years just to be safe?
Yes best to just replace in most cases. If you're referring to the pump in an AIO, they tend to fail first. AIO will be more prone to those failues. So you don't necessarily have to get a water cooler, as air coolers are just as effective in most cases, just depends on your needs/wants.

You can also usually monitor fan and pump in HW monitoring software (such as HWInfo). Also you can generally monitor temperatures, if a CPU pump fails, the temperatue will sky rocket in seconds, not minutes or hours.

As for your GPU cooler, you can usually get replacements, but you have to contact the card manufacturer.
 
Aug 2, 2019
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Thank you sir! Yes I've used HWinfo for monitoring temps lately. I haven't had any issues I just feel like I'm playing a dangerous game going 2+ years on AIO coolers. As you have suggested; going forward I intend on considering air cooled components much more. I see a lot of people run them just fine. Even when I'm driving my computer at its hardest for extended periods of time, the GPU never goes over 55C and the CPU even lower than that. From what I know, 80-90C on chips is when its time to start worrying about better cooling, right?
 
Aug 1, 2019
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Still having a single component in +80 degrees will pretty much put your case in burning mode, usually nowadays all chipsets just turn off and voltage cuts when the temperature is way too high, we don't fry chips anymore but yeah they go off or give you a huge pick of bad performance during the heat, anything on +80c will be felt from the outside.
 

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