Question How to make Intel i7-8750H run at full speed?

gggplaya

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Sounds like the same HP omen laptop I have, purchased from microcenter??

It won't run at full speed with the power cable unplugged.

Also, update the BIOS, they made some changes to help fix gaming performance on that laptop.

Make sure you have a laptop cooler underneath it to help keep the temps down.

Download a program called "Throttle Stop" and run the multiplier at max. That should help keep the clock speeds up while gaming. It'll still have a temperature override though, so it's important to keep the temperatures down.
 

Phazoner

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That makes no sense. You may think it would improve the performance, but it wont. If the CPU usage isn't going higher, is because the programs running on it aren't using (and won't use) more of it. If a program doesn't load faster is because of the program files quantity or size, the storage speed or the RAM speed. If a game doesn't run faster is because the GPU is at full speed and isn't able to deliver more frames, so the CPU isn't needing to calculate more frames as the GPU won't draw them and the CPU would be hotter for no reasonable reason.
 

gggplaya

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That makes no sense. You may think it would improve the performance, but it wont. If the CPU usage isn't going higher, is because the programs running on it aren't using (and won't use) more of it. If a program doesn't load faster is because of the program files quantity or size, the storage speed or the RAM speed. If a game doesn't run faster is because the GPU is at full speed and isn't able to deliver more frames, so the CPU isn't needing to calculate more frames as the GPU won't draw them and the CPU would be hotter for no reasonable reason.
It makes perfect sense. Having clock speeds stay high helps with microstutters. When the cpu throttles down, it take a few clock cycles to get back up to speed when demand comes, this leads to some frame drops. The cpu throttling on certain laptops is overly aggressive and pre-emptively throttles down before it even close to hot. It's safe, thermal throttling limits are still in place, and will throttle down due to high thermals as necessary.

I've been using throttle stop for years, it solved my problems on my Lenovo and now my HP omen laptop. It works, the proof is in the pudding.
 
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Phazoner

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It makes perfect sense. Having clock speeds stay high helps with microstutters. When the cpu throttles down, it take a few clock cycles to get back up to speed when demand comes, this leads to some frame drops. The cpu throttling on certain laptops is overly aggressive and pre-emptively throttles down before it even close to hot. It's safe, thermal throttling limits are still in place, and will throttle down due to high thermals as necessary.

I've been using throttle stop for years, it solved my problems on my Lenovo and now my HP omen laptop. It works, the proof is in the pudding.
First time in my life I've heard something like that. You'll never go to bed without learning something new! Thanks :)

Edit: Maybe there's an easier workaround for him if the problem isn't throttling but just clock speed variances: He can set the minimum CPU usage in Windows' energy configuration.
 

gggplaya

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First time in my life I've heard something like that. You'll never go to bed without learning something new! Thanks :)

Edit: Maybe there's an easier workaround for him if the problem isn't throttling but just clock speed variances: He can set the minimum CPU usage in Windows' energy configuration.
The problem with using windows power management is that the base clocks on laptops are so low. The 8750H for instance has a base clock of 2.2ghz and boost of 4.1ghz. So when you set windows power management to maintain 100% cpu speed when plugged in, it only stays at 2.2ghz base clock, which is still super low, which is why you get stutters because it has to make such wide swings in clock speed. Throttle stop will keep you at full 4.1ghz boost until thermals bring you down. Using a laptop pad will keep thermals low, and therefore keep you at full boost clock. If temperatures are problem and still throttling you, you can set your multiplier to something like 36 which will give you 3.6ghz and play with the multiplier until you find a sweet boost speed which will all you to play at a constant speed and not throttle.

Many people are undervolting the processor a little with the 8750H, this will help drop temps about 8-10 degrees.

I only discovered throttle stop after doing a bit of research on my Lenovo Y520 laptop. I tried exhausting every avenue like windows power managment.
 
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InvalidError

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Unless your laptop's BIOS has overclocking options you can use to bypass speedboost's dynamic clocks, your options are pretty much limited to setting your Windows power profile to Performance instead of Balanced.

Boost clocks shouldn't be causing meaningful stutter on modern CPUs: starting from Haswell, Intel's power spec requires that the PSU be able to handle the CPU going from sleep to ~100W state in 10us (IIRC the spec is 8A/10us), likewise the other way around. If you have to go through roundabout ways of bypassing speedstep to solve stutter issues on newer CPUs, has to be something wrong elsewhere (possibly compounded by variable clocks) that is costing you orders of magnitude more than the ~10us it takes to wake up the whole CPU.
 
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