How to move Recycle Bin to another drive? [Win 10]

Astralv

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May 6, 2013
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I want to move Recycle Bin to another drive to avoid using space on C drive that may or may bot restore when Recycle Bin is emptied. I am moving large files in and out of computer. Any points against moving it? If not- how do I move it? Thank you.
 
Basically the recycle bin is a gui for the old undelete. On drives data isnt delete just the pointer to the data. IE the data is on which ever drive you deleted it from.

Now you can change the max per disk the recycle binkeeps track of. Right click recycle bin the properties. Default is 10% but you can set it to what ever you want. Mine is set to 500MB's for example.
 

N3rdR4ge

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In short, you cannot change the recycle location.

Instead, just move the files you wish to store in the recycle bin to another drive in a folder you name RECYCLE until they are ready to be moved or deleted.
 

Astralv

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Thank you for your reply. Are you sure it can not be moved? I remember reading about moving it some time, but I can be wrong.

I don't need to store files, I need them to be gone, but I noted in the past that when you install something on SSD and then delete, often it does not release all space. Like if you installed 50Gb folder and your drive went from 200 to 150Gb, then you delete this 50Gb folder but it does not go to 200, it goes to 190Gb for some reason. So I want to avoid losing space by deleting files. Because if my files on D drive but recycle bin on C drive, it is the same as moving 50Gb from D to C. Or am I wrong? Thank you.
 

N3rdR4ge

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When you uninstall a program, it does not always remove all traces of that program. Your concern has nothing do with the recycle bin. For example, you remove the game fallout 4. The saved game files will still reside on your drive so you don't lose your progress if you install the game again. What you need is cleaning programs like CCleaner and SpaceSniffer to clean up space. It takes research and practice to understand how windows manages files. SpaceSniffer will at least tell you what folders are taking up excess space. It will be your discretion weather or not it is necessary to delete what you find. For future uninstalls, there's a program called Revo Uninstaller that will help you automatically remove leftover traces of programs.

ccleaner
http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download/standard

spacesniffer
http://download.cnet.com/SpaceSniffer/3001-18512_4-10913555.html

revouninstaller
https://www.revouninstaller.com/start_freeware_download.html
 
There's a recycle bin on every nonremovable drive! The one that holds your deleted files is the one on the drive the file was originally on.

Have you tried the simplest thing first? Try Windows' own Disk Cleanup with the clean up system files option
 

Astralv

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Thank you for your replies. I don't need disk clean up because I am not talking about programs, I am talking about files- mostly samples (audio). I do not understand this well, but SSDs have Trim, which decides how space is allocated. There is something about how cells get filled. For example, if the cell was used but not completely filled, SSD will start writing new files on new cell and leave unfinished cell unfilled. As I say- I do not know how it works, but it leaves some space in every cell, and then if you delete small part of data, it does not go back and move all other files to fill that space. Trim is not always works correctly, so it is better to avoid recycle been at all.
 

USAFRet

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An SSD and TRIM has nothing to do with the Windows Recycle bin.
Nothing at all.
 

Since Vista, System Restore monitors more than just programs and system files so you'd have to delete the restore points as well. This is also why dual-booting XP with System Restore enabled can be problematic--its System Restore deletes these other file types on all the other disks.


TRIM is the way the OS tells the SSD if something is really deleted. TRIM goes and occasionally marks all really deleted files as such, so the SSD's garbage collection knows it is free space and can zero out all the cells they occupy. Because flash erase is so slow, doing this in advance keeps write performance up as writing to empty cells is much faster than having to erase them then when the space is needed.
 

Astralv

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If I delete 2Gb of data on D drive, it does not write it to C in RECYCLE BIN?
 

USAFRet

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"deleting" does not 'write'.

A deletion simply marks that space...blocks and file pointer...as available to be overwritten eventually.
The Recycle Bin is simply something the OS shows to you, the human, as what you 'deleted' (but not really deleted).

It is not a specific space where files go to die.

There is nothing to worry about.
 
your recycle bin's properties will reflect a recycle bin for each drive, of which you can adjust space allocated to each independently. If worried about wasted space, there is an option to 'instant delete', effectively skipping the 'in the trash, not really deleted yet' function of the recycle bin....

As others already alluded to, deleting something on D does not write it to C....
 

Astralv

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Ha ha. I thought it was like concentration camp for the files. So the files actually not getting moved anywhere, they stay where they are, just marked as deleted on their own drives... Ok. thank you!
 
Basically the recycle bin is a gui for the old undelete. On drives data isnt delete just the pointer to the data. IE the data is on which ever drive you deleted it from.

Now you can change the max per disk the recycle binkeeps track of. Right click recycle bin the properties. Default is 10% but you can set it to what ever you want. Mine is set to 500MB's for example.
 
Yes, only the very first byte of the file is erased when "deleted." That's why when you use recovery software the first letter of the filename isn't there and has to be replaced. It's also why TRIM is needed--there's no way otherwise for the SSD to know if files are in the recycle bin waiting to be restored or truly should be zeroed out.
 
Feb 27, 2018
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Actually WIN 10 does have a bin for each drive (you can't see it on the disk file column, but if you go to see the properties of Recycle Bin by Right click on Desk Top the list of drives is displayed (all of the hard drives) with some options as to max size, etc,).

So it's all setup by Redmond. They have been getting their act together recently (bye, bye Steve), although set-up and updating/upgrading are still a PIA compared to OSX !!!!

Try testing by deleting of two different drives, opening the Recycle Bin icon, and hey 'Voila'.

 

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