Question How to overclock my IBM ThinkPad x40

Sep 12, 2021
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what about overclocking IBM ThinkPad X40? I tried using clockgen but whenever i press Read Clocks, my system entirely freezes. I tried setfsb, but i can't find my pll in it. Also i know about systool but same problem as clockgen - freezes my system.
OS:WinXP
Hardware:stock, as from factory
Bios:as from factory
 
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Sep 12, 2021
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Overclocking a nearly 20-year-old laptop is just begging for trouble. And it's such low performance that I can't imagine that a safe overclock on hardware not intended for overclocking would be any more useful than a racing stripe on a stagecoach.
i recently overclocked IBM ThinkPad R51 using SetFSB on CY28346ZI pll and got it from 1.60 ghz to 1.80 ghz. I didn't felt much performance gain because windows 7 loads disk too much, but i saw better results in cpu benchmark
 

ex_bubblehead

Champion
Moderator
i recently overclocked IBM ThinkPad R51 using SetFSB on CY28346ZI pll and got it from 1.60 ghz to 1.80 ghz. I didn't felt much performance gain because windows 7 loads disk too much, but i saw better results in cpu benchmark
And a benchmark is NOT real world performance. You only raised the clock 200MHz. This will not be noticeable by a user in the real world, but will cause other issues such as overheating.
 
Your most effective performance booster for an old laptop is to convert to a ssd.
The results will be very noticeable.

It has been done.
Here is one link to the process:
 
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Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Laptops, notebooks, MacBooks or any of those tiny form factor, slim, poor excuses for a mobile desktop rely entirely on 2 things. The battery and the cooling solution.

When you bump the power factor by overclocking, you take an already taxed heatpipe and add wattage it wasn't designed for. That adds an exponential amount of heat, and thereby problems later. Sure, you'll get a benchmark a little better, but once the laptop heats up with continuous usage, you'll find it's pushing thermal limits if not throttling already. Taking a stable performance, adding instability (OC Always add a small amount of instability at a minimum) and ending up with the same, if not worse, fps after an hour of gaming.

It's a laptop, not a desktop. The low power 25w TDP cpu will not take to higher clockspeeds and the unintended higher power draw, well and the very minimal gains are not worth the added aggravation.
 
Sep 12, 2021
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And a benchmark is NOT real world performance. You only raised the clock 200MHz. This will not be noticeable by a user in the real world, but will cause other issues such as overheating.
I want to overclock those just because i want. I know i will not raise noticeable enough to feel more performance but i want to do this to like run cpu stress test and check what is max heat. There is no videos on youtube where they overclock these exact models i have so if i post on youtube how i overclock these thinkpads it will be something exclusive that only my channel has. Also i can use TPFan control where i can manually choose fan speed. I can set it to max speed and it will help alot.
 
Sep 12, 2021
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Your most effective performance booster for an old laptop is to convert to a ssd.
The results will be very noticeable.

It has been done.
Here is one link to the process:
SSD upgrade will be not so noticeable in windows xp. More noticeable will be cpu overclocking (that im trying to figure out how) and ram upgrade.
 
Sep 12, 2021
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10
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Laptops, notebooks, MacBooks or any of those tiny form factor, slim, poor excuses for a mobile desktop rely entirely on 2 things. The battery and the cooling solution.

When you bump the power factor by overclocking, you take an already taxed heatpipe and add wattage it wasn't designed for. That adds an exponential amount of heat, and thereby problems later. Sure, you'll get a benchmark a little better, but once the laptop heats up with continuous usage, you'll find it's pushing thermal limits if not throttling already. Taking a stable performance, adding instability (OC Always add a small amount of instability at a minimum) and ending up with the same, if not worse, fps after an hour of gaming.

It's a laptop, not a desktop. The low power 25w TDP cpu will not take to higher clockspeeds and the unintended higher power draw, well and the very minimal gains are not worth the added aggravation.
I know everyone is against me overclocking IBM ThinkPad x40, r51 and r60e, but i do it just for experimental purposes.
  1. Only one i overclocked already is ThinkPad r51 and with overclocking active and cpu load with prime 95 it doesn't heat up even highter than 80 degrees. That is even with original bios fan controller. If i run TPFan control and set it to max values, it doesn't ho highter than 70 degrees.
  2. Film exclusive video on youtube about how to overclock IBM ThinkPad x40 and another 2 models i have. Noone filmed it yet so i might be first and everyone who is searching for old thinkpad overclocking with a really big chance finds exactly my videos.
  3. I really like overclocking all computers that i can. I overclocked core i5-3470 non k one and igpu for it too. GeForce GT 730 was overclocked untill artifacts started to appear. Then i stress test them and decide to let the overclocking on or lower it.
 

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